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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With the (2014 S) on a lift table I want to lift the bike to change it's tires. I'll be removing both wheels. Prefer to not buy a pit-bull type for the rear just for this purpose. Using the center stand is problematic because the front wheel starts off in a vice or chock and the center stand will rock bike rearward out of same.

I'd like to use one of the inexpensive flat topped manual jacks to lift the bike. Like this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/1100-LBS-S...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

The area around the oil change plate appears to be pretty flat. Anyone know of any issues picking the bike up from that point? I can't quite tell if it would sit plumb if the lift was also under the exhaust/left side of the skid plate, it looks fairly level.

And, I don't know if lifting in that engine area is a no-no.

(I'll have the bike secured with straps in this configuration, not just teetering on a jack)

Thanks
 

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I lift my bikes by the engine while one of the wheels is clamped all the time. On the MTS you can use the center stand and clamp the wheel you are not removing. You can add a bunch of weight to the rear rack to elevate the front wheel as well. I would not jack it by the skid plate, it is flimsy and not solidly connected to anything structural.

t_bare
 
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I've always used the centeratand for removing one wheel or the other. If you are changing the rear, having a full tank helps ensure the bike rests on the front wheel. If you are still uneasy about the bike, strap the bars down or put some weight on the front of the bike.

As for using the plates to jack, I wouldn't recommend it. These plates are pretty flimsy. Also, consider how they are attached to the bike. I would anticipate either the plates bending or the attachment points breaking. These plates are much closer to cosmetic than functional.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Bike is on a lift table so it's not easy or very safe to use centerstand in normal way.

What about lifting from the low point of the engine (remove skid plate)?

I'm not strong enough to put the bike on the lift backwards. Anyway, I'm removing both wheels at the same time. A friend has a tire machine, he's an hour away so I a) don't want to bother him twice, and b) don't want to make 2 trips.

Getting the bike to tilt one way or the other is no problem, I've got fore and aft tie down points on the lift table.

Probably the simplest thing is to lift the (folded up) center stand with the jack, near it's pivot points. But that's a little shaky for my tastes.

Also considering jacking up the rear wheel. I can do that with a rod through the hole and a bottle jack (plus some safety hardware so nothing slips apart in use). That will allow it to go high enough that I can lower the centerstand, and then lower rear wheel. That will leave front in vice, rear in air, bike on centerstand. Go from there.
 

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I know exactly what you're trying to do and this is how I've approached this with my 1200S
- put bike on center stand and strap down to table life to prevent falling left or right
- remove front wheel (weight on the back)
- put jack stands under the front forks at a height where the rear wheel is lifted
- remove rear wheel
- use jack stands under the rear wheel.

4 x Jack stands are under $100

Unfortunately I don't have a picture, but hopefully you get the idea.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know exactly what you're trying to do and this is how I've approached this with my 1200S
- put bike on center stand and strap down to table life to prevent falling left or right
- remove front wheel (weight on the back)
- put jack stands under the front forks at a height where the rear wheel is lifted
- remove rear wheel
- use jack stands under the rear wheel.

4 x Jack stands are under $100

Unfortunately I don't have a picture, but hopefully you get the idea.
I understand. Thanks. About what I described as my "Also considering" except I've getting it on the centerstand while in a vice (or chock). And I didn't have jackstands. No sure I have enough room, I assume you have some little ones?

What did you use to stick through the holes for the front jack stands? Or, how did oyu interface the fork to the jackstands in the front?
 

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Front and rear stands. Really. You don't have to spend Pitbull money on these but if you are going to maintain your bike you need the tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Front and rear stands. Really. You don't have to spend Pitbull money on these but if you are going to maintain your bike you need the tools.
Interfere with lift table vice. If I was on the floor, I'd agree with you.
 

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I'm with Chuck. If you are going to be taking both off at the same time, get some stands. Take the bike off the table and just put it on the floor with some stands. While I appreciate the ingenuity, the other ways mentioned are going to eventually result in a bike on its side.
 

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I use that type of lift under a "enduro" type skid plate (with straps) all the time to get both wheels off the ground for replacement or just cleaning. I would not do that with the stock set up. Maybe concider up-grading the skid plate altho they are not cheep.
 

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If you have a center stand you don’t need jacks or lift tables. Get 4 ratcheting tie downs and put one on each side of the handlebars and one on each rear grab handle. Hook them on your rafters and tighten them up until both wheels are equally off the ground. Center stand is still carrying most of the weight and the bike can’t fall over.

Joe
 

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Due to limited space my MTS "lives" on my lift; on the centerstand, as the last 2 ST3's "lived". So over the last 10 years I have had both wheels off the bikes on the centerstand numerous times without issue. I would strap down the rear, remove the front wheel, unstrap, and rest the forks on a milk carton/MX stand. Next, remove the real wheel. On the MTS I would strap the front end down to the milk carton before removing the rear wheel because the front end is much lighter than the ST's. Make damn sure that you loosen all the axle nuts, pinch bolts and caliper bolts before you roll the bike onto the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On the MTS I would strap the front end down to the milk carton before removing the rear wheel because the front end is much lighter than the ST's. Make damn sure that you loosen all the axle nuts, pinch bolts and caliper bolts before you roll the bike onto the stand.
Pretty much my process before the lift. Thanks. Notice you are from Clarksville. Grew up there myself, some family still there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Make damn sure that you loosen all the axle nuts, pinch bolts and caliper bolts before you roll the bike onto the stand.
Figured the stand would make all that easier. Well, with the bike clamped in a vice or in a chock anyway. I use an impact on the rear to loosen, never had any trouble loosening the front.

I assume since you are putting it on the centerstand that you are not putting the front wheel in a vice or chock?, since that's problematic to do since the bike rocks rearward. I could see where that could be precarious when loosening.
 
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