Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings from a newbie! I am on the verge of buying a 2013 MS Touring S model.....VERY low mileage, used as dealer demo. I have never owned a Ducati, but have ridden the MS and love it. BEFORE I BUY, I am looking for opinions from owners about the downside (if any!) of owning/ riding this bike. My current ride is a Honda ST1300. Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I've got a 2013 Pikes Peak 1200S and love the bike. I moved from an FJR 1300 after about a 4 year break so hard to say what the big differences are. The FJR was more comfortable on long rides but I had alot of creature comforts on the old bike. If I had any complaint about the bike it would be 1st and 2nd gear is kind of choppy. I commute to work 2 - 3 times a week and ride the very few twisty roads that exist in Florida a couple times a month. The MTS handles both jobs great and I'm very happy with my purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
At that age, I would want to see at least one major valve service in the service history, regardless of mileage. The cams in these bikes are belt driven, like any belt they deteriorate due to multiple factors, one of them is simple age. Replacing those belts is part of that service. If a belt fails, you're rebuilding an engine, in most cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
True that the belts are due to be changed after 5 years. Belt change is much quicker (cheaper) than valve adjustment with belt change. If it was me, I'd look at it this way:
If I can get the mileage up to 15K miles in a year or less, then I would put off the service until then. But if I'm going to rack up mileage slower than that, then do belts now, and put off valve adjustment until the new belts get 15K miles on them. The main problem with belts is the stretch due to mileage. This change in valve timing affects how well the engine runs. Amazingly the belts can get really loose without jumping a tooth. You can easily pull one of the pieces of belt cover and see how loose the belt is. Note the belts should be replaced, not tightened.
But like already mentioned, the stakes are high. Peace of mind is worth a lot.
Tires are due to be changed after 5 years too. But people vary in their budget and need for sticky tires.
Beyond that, be ready for regular rear brake bleeding to keep it working right. Be ready for the fuel sensor to fail.
If you are unhappy with the way it runs under 3000 rpm, consider a decat and tune to cure that.
See if the selling dealer will give you a 6 month warranty on the battery since it's old.

Guys will come up and talk to you about the bike at gas stations.
Women will be happier when you tell them you are riding a Ducati instead of a Honda.
You will have more fun than riding any Honda.
 

·
Bon Vivant
Joined
·
11,440 Posts
If you've never owned a ducati be prepared for little things and maybe some bigger things too. Some of these multis have poor fueling with flat spots or twitchy throttle, some guys complain about the rear brake, and others about the electrical things that fail: fuel gauge, electronic suspension problems, and more. There are other problems that pop up as well, but none of these things except a rear brake that doesn't work, are pervasive and they are rare in most cases. I hate to say this but it is a ducati, it is not going to be "Honda" perfect. Oh and BTW, this engine is not designed to be ridden below 3000 RPM - people that do that are lugging the engine and are asking for crank damage. Keep the RPMs above 4K.

What it is going to do is give you performance that is above anything you can imagine. The Multi is IMO the most well rounded bike there is; it is an excellent touring bike, it can hold it's on on a track or in the canyons, it is a commuter, and you can take it on dirt roads with decent results. It is not a heavy super-slab touring bike but as a sport tourer it is hard to beat. I have over 40,000 miles on mine and I'd bet that 38,000 of that has been 2-up.

Ducati are expensive to maintain - valve adjust, service, and belts will run you $1200 - $1500 , valve check and oil is every 7500 miles with belts every 15000. A lot of people change their oil a lot more frequently.

Personally I think nothing can touch the Multistrada as an all-rounder. If you can live with its niggles and quirks it may be the only bike you'll ever need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
It's value will plummet faster than a ships anchor. It's still a demo bike?

As far as operating/riding it, comfortable, fun, overpowered. IMHO. Reliable for the most part, only a couple problems that warranty solved and one it didn't. Unhappy with warranty non-service on that item (exhaust flapper).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
I’m on my second Ducati MS. First one was a ‘08 MS. Currently own a MS ‘15 S. The 08 developed a cold start issue at around 18k. Ran great otherwise. Traded her in at around 22k mi with no other issues.

The multistrada does it all. Adrenaline with comfort. Can’t beat that! ??️
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top