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2021 Multistrada V4S
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently own a 2013 MTS and had a 2011 MTS prior to that. I put over 30k miles on the 2011 without any issues and it was the best bike I have ever owned. My 2013 gas been more problematic. The clutch had issues when new, the rear brake never works, the dash was replaced at 8k miles because the service indicator would not reset, and I am on my third fuel sensor, which just died. The 2013 has been a fun bike but I am sick of the fuel sensor issues and would like some of the new electronic features that started to be introduced with the 2015 MTS. I also like the idea of having cornering ABS as a safety feature and cruise control for longer rides. The 2013 seemed like a good upgrade from the 2011 because of the sky hook suspension and twin plug cylinder heads. I am now trying to justify the $15k or so it will take to upgrade to a 1260.

I am curious to hear from people who have upgraded from the pre-2015 MTS. Are there enough improvements to warrant an upgrade? What do you like about the 1260 and what do you miss about the 1200, if anything? More to the point did they finally put in a fuel sensor that does not fail every 2-3k miles and does the rear brake actually work?

Thanks!
 

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2019 1250 GS
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Interested in the replies. I think the only they could add that would get me to upgrade is something without a chain. I hate chain maintenance when traveling.
 

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the 1260 is a better bike than the 1200 2015, especially torque wise at 4000 rpm's but i'm holding out until the next model multistrada (expecting a detuned panigale engine) before trading in my 2014 multi.
 

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I see no reason to move honestly. As for Nutjob's statement, the 2015 (and 2016) have a crappy mid-range torque dip because of the horrible airbox they were made with. This is why everyone is moving to the 2016 late-cycle Pikes Peak box that all 2017s also have. Functionally, you can get everything the 2015+ bikes have (minus the nice TFT screen) and more with Tuneboy. I would just hold off until a new one comes out that really is worth upgrading to.
 

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The 1260 engine is a significant upgrade, but one some riders won't like. It probably fits the way most people ride Multistradas better in reality, but loses some of it's sport bike DNA to get there. Contrary to most of the professional reviews, it's my feeling that this sacrifice is 90% engine, the suspension changes have little to do with it. You can't fatten up the torque curve of an engine that much and not change it's character. Like most vehicles with a linear torque curve, it feels slower, but is faster.

TL;DR, the 2018 is mostly an engine upgrade, you won't notice the rest of the new parts over a 2017 bike, excepting the QS. Depending on how you ride, that engine upgrade may be a very good thing, or not.
 

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I would say that if you went out and modified your Multi's because you wanted just a bit more thrust then the 1260 is worth looking at... it stock will likely be pretty close to a modded 1200 (and once tuners get through with it I'm sure it'll give you even more).

Even so, I'd also ride it to get a feel if the changed geometry slows down handling enough to bother you.
 
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Test ride one. I had a 2011 and now have the 1260. If my 2011 hadn't been destroyed, then the upgrade would not have been worth the money to me. I've only got 630 miles on my new bike, but I'm not riding it around thinking that it's so much better than the 1200.
 

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I bought a 2010 Multi, trading in a Guzzi Norge. The 2010 has been rock solid, fast, handles well, does everything I need it to do and has been basically trouble free aside from a tank replacement from ethanol fuel. I have 31,000 miles on it and it still runs like a Swiss watch. Do i use all the electronic goodies on the bike, NO. I run it in touring mode 98% of the time. I have taken the bike on long trips and around town crap and it just keeps running great. The only addition i made was a Termi exhaust system and chip, which solved the low end surging. Do i want to trade up to a new 1260? NO, not at this time. It all sounds wonderful for the new Multi, but in the long run the 2010 i have is plenty satisfying. Why the fuel sensor on your bike has burned out 3 times, points to some other problem, unless the fuel sensors are faulty from the factory, which i believe is in CHINA. A long test ride should answer your questions.
 

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I bought a 2010 Multi, trading in a Guzzi Norge. The 2010 has been rock solid, fast, handles well, does everything I need it to do and has been basically trouble free aside from a tank replacement from ethanol fuel. I have 31,000 miles on it and it still runs like a Swiss watch. Do i use all the electronic goodies on the bike, NO. I run it in touring mode 98% of the time. I have taken the bike on long trips and around town crap and it just keeps running great. The only addition i made was a Termi exhaust system and chip, which solved the low end surging. Do i want to trade up to a new 1260? NO, not at this time. It all sounds wonderful for the new Multi, but in the long run the 2010 i have is plenty satisfying. Why the fuel sensor on your bike has burned out 3 times, points to some other problem, unless the fuel sensors are faulty from the factory, which i believe is in CHINA. A long test ride should answer your questions.
You went from a Guzzi to a Ducati, and I went from a Ducati to a Guzzi. :cool:
 

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I’m going to disagree with you guys and say the DVT Multistradas (1200 and 1260) are worth the upgrade from the older 1200’s.

The electronic suspension has a lot more range now between firm and soft settings, digital cruse works great, the dash is much better, the motor is both stronger and smoother, it is more comfortable to me in a lot of ways, it has better side bags that are less fiddly, gas tank doesn’t swell with ethanol anymore, the passenger accommodations are better (says the wife), the handle bar switches light up at night for ease of use, the factory LED lights are 1000% brighter, I could go on.

I’m not saying the old bikes are bad at all but the new ones are just better IMO.

I bought my 2015 S in early 2016 with the touring, urban options. It now has 6500 miles and other than a few recalls it has been trouble free.
 

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2019 1250 GS
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Even so, I'd also ride it to get a feel if the changed geometry slows down handling enough to bother you.
This is the one thing that I need to determine for myself...how much difference will I feel between the two bikes?

I love the handling characteristics of my 2014 and how sporty it is, that being said I've hustled some pretty big bikes around corners and the 1260 motor is fun.
 

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This is the one thing that I need to determine for myself...how much difference will I feel between the two bikes?

I love the handling characteristics of my 2014 and how sporty it is, that being said I've hustled some pretty big bikes around corners and the 1260 motor is fun.
Yea it might be a non-issue... but the bike is longer with less rake and a bit heavier so the handling will be different just 'by how much'. All the reasons they gave for changing the geometry were intended to improve touring behavior... I personally didn't think the 1200's touring behavior was a problem.
 
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I personally didn't think the 1200's touring behavior was a problem.
I agree on that and I only had issues with speeds well over 100 MPH when I had it laden with a full top box and additional 30L Kreiga on the backseat. I can't speak to what it'd be like with the GranTurismo side cases on.
 

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I had a 2011 and now have the 1260. If my 2011 hadn't been destroyed, then the upgrade would not have been worth the money to me. I've only got 630 miles on my new bike, but I'm not riding it around thinking that it's so much better than the 1200.
Great answer. I was just sitting on a 1260 the other day, and while it's a beauty, I too would only go for it if my 2012 got nuked.
 

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2021 Multistrada V4S
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Reasons I upgraded to a 2018 MTS 1260 (long)

I picked up a 2018 MTS 1260 Touring on Saturday and put 400 miles on it within the first 24 hours of ownership. I rode down Hwy 1 through Big Sur and also did a bit of freeway riding, to really get a feel for the new bike. Here are my thoughts on why I decided to make the upgrade:

- The added torque from 3,000-6,000 RPM makes the bike much easier to ride in the situations I use the MTS for, commuting and long distance touring. I will not be taking the MTS to the track. Nor will I be tearing up the backroads at insane speeds, so the new motor has more than enough power for me.
- The transmission on the 2018 is less clunky and has better feel than the one on my 2013. I also like having the quick shifter when I am feeling to lazy to use the clutch on long rides, but you do have to be pretty forceful when using it.
- The brakes on the 2018 feel stronger than the 2013. The rear brake also works on the 2018, at least so far. The rear brake on my 2011 never worked and on the 2013 it was barely effective.
- The added rake and trail on the 2018 inspires more confidence in the situations that I tend to ride the MTS. The 2018 feels more stable and does not dart around as much on our crappy California freeways. I assume part of that is due to the improvements made to Skyhook over the past five years.
- The electronics package and control switches are a big improvement over the 2013. The new TFT screen is easy to read even in bright sunlight and works well at night. The UI of the dash is very easy to learn and helps you understand how the changes you are making will impact the bike. I find the new larger switch gear easier to use with gloves than the 2013. I always struggled with the two small switches that changed the odometer and also had problems with the start button that turned on the heated grips on the 2013. It is nice to have a dedicated button for the heated grips now. Having cruise control is also going to be nice, since I ride I-5 up to Oregon a few times per year.
- Ergonomic preference obviously differs from rider to rider, but I find the seat height and distance to both the foot pegs and the ground to fit me better on the 1260. I am 6'2 with a 32 inch inseam and I was never completely flat footed at a stop on the 1200. On the 1260, with the stock seat, my knees are slight bent and I am flat footed at a stop. While riding my knees are higher than on the 2018, which to me feels more comfortable. I will eventually get a custom seat and the kit that raises the seat a bit. According to my dealer the seat raising kit that came with the 2015-2017 MTS is not included with the 2018.
- The new side bags are a big improvement over the multiple clamp bags of the 2013. The seem to seal a lot better. I had some issues with leaking on the 2013 and the 2011, so I am curious to see if the 2018 bags let in any water.
- Of course Ducati offering 0% financing also slightly influenced my decision. :grin2: I was going to pay cash, but being able to invest that money and not have it cost me anything to do so is a nice benefit.

There are a few minor things I will miss about the 2013. Specifically the key holder in the front fairing and the handle near the left rear passenger peg that you can use to put the bike on the side stand. Other than that, I am very happy that I upgraded to the 2018. This is my third MTS and I still find the MTS to be the best all around bike for me.
 

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2019 1250 GS
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I love the brakes, holy cow they are effective! I thought the handling was great as well. I agree with your other comments about the dash. The demo I rode had the low seat installed and it was too low for me. Flat footing was great but it took out too much leg room. I felt like the cruise was so much better having a dedicated button rather than using TuneBoy. The auto blipper was good if used properly. I think the only two niggles I had were the frame plugs hitting around my knees and my shin touching the hose coming off the water pump. I think having the standard height seat would cure both of those items. I am shorter than you but have a 32” inseam.
 

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According to my dealer the seat raising kit that came with the 2015-2017 MTS is not included with the 2018.
Are you talking about the two plastic strips that raise the seat about an inch, plus the little piece that fits on the passenger seat, to cover the gap if the rider seat is in the lower position? Because those pieces absolutely do come with the 2018, mine shipped with the seat in the high position.
 

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I wonder if the QS on the Panigale is smoother. The QS on the 1260 seems to work about as well as Tuneboy; great at full throttle, YMMV otherwise. After owning a Tuneboy bike I was prepared for the very rough mid-throttle shift, could be a bad day for someone who didn't know.
 

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2021 Multistrada V4S
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes, that is what I am talking about. My dealer must be misinformed as they said the strips and passenger seat piece do not come with the bike. I will check back with them.Thanks!
 

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I love everything about my 2011.

But damn, Those new ones are pretty arnt they?
 
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