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I recently picked up a 02 620 dark for a reasonable price. I would like to take it down to the frame and get the frame repainted to just give some updated style to it. I know it's not a sought after bike and the frames current condition is not horrible. I would like to go red, white or something other than black. Seems like a good amount of work, and I'm not worried about getting my money back out of it. My only reservation is that the tank is charcoal color and the forks are blacked out. Not sure if the forks were decorated or swapped out. That said I believe more than the frame will need to be recoated. Comments, thoughts??


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I'd go red or gold. Classic and tasteful, but that is just me.
 

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I recently picked up a 02 620 dark for a reasonable price. I would like to take it down to the frame and get the frame repainted to just give some updated style to it. I know it's not a sought after bike and the frames current condition is not horrible. I would like to go red, white or something other than black. Seems like a good amount of work, and I'm not worried about getting my money back out of it. My only reservation is that the tank is charcoal color and the forks are blacked out. Not sure if the forks were decorated or swapped out. That said I believe more than the frame will need to be recoated. Comments, thoughts??
Just a thought but if this is your first bike or close to it I would just ride it instead of taking the time out to do a frame restoration. I say this because there is a good chance after riding for a couple seasons you might want another bike, maybe next model up type of thing and can look more for the frame colors combo then. If it is a bike that you plan on having for the proverbial "forever" then disregard the above advice.
 

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Hello

I've stripped-down and powdercoated all three of my current Duc's (four if I count the one I gifted to #2 son) and they never seem to go back together as easily as they got blown apart.
That being said, I'm a huge advocate of bike owners "making it theirs" by truly customizing it (not "oooh, look, rizoma mirrors!")
It's easy to get caught up in the "while I'm here" syndrome, that is one of the main factors for taking much longer than you may have planned.
You also learn a great deal about your motorbike.

JMHO.....
 

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Hello

I've stripped-down and powdercoated all three of my current Duc's (four if I count the one I gifted to #2 son) and they never seem to go back together as easily as they got blown apart.
That being said, I'm a huge advocate of bike owners "making it theirs" by truly customizing it (not "oooh, look, rizoma mirrors!")
It's easy to get caught up in the "while I'm here" syndrome, that is one of the main factors for taking much longer than you may have planned.
You also learn a great deal about your motorbike.

JMHO.....
Oh yeah I am very much a victim of the "while I am here" right now...
 

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Paint is way down my list of things to spend time on when I put money in a bike. I'm doing my SS now but it was really rough. I spend my money on 1) making the bike fit me and feel right 2) tires 3) tune and maintenance 4) suspension set up for me 5) pipes and intake upgrade I may take a bike apart over the winter and paint the frame etc, but only while I was going to do a full maintenance anyway. My SS is a case of it being pulled apart anyway so might as well go the extra mile and paint it. I'm rattle canning the frame , engine, and wheels. The bike is apart for a fork rebuild, swing arm replacement, cylinder stud replacement, fuel tank replacement, flywheel replacement, starter replacement, crank plug replacement, belt replacement, steering brg. replacement, chain replacement, clutch rebuild, valve adjustment and probably something I forgot. That's where my money went.
 

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If you value your time and you spend it on a bike you are already commenting on as not being sought after, will you be happy after you have spent a hundred hours on it?

I think the answer lies in what you know and what you like and how much you value the experience and knowledge gained. Wisdom always quotes the journey over the results. Some projects are stepping stones because no matter what you read or how much you can pay other people to outsource the project, you can't achieve the feeling of making something you are proud of without getting your hands dirty.

We don't respect things that are easy. We respect things because they are hard as they strip us down to our souls and find out what we are made of. "Can I see a project through when a lot of the time I am taking two steps backward for every step forward." "Will I do things over, even when it means throwing out parts I have damaged? "Will I start to take shortcuts when the going gets rough?" "When other people disagree with my art, will I change to please them or put more of myself into it?"

If you contemplate these questions, you will experience feelings that will answer your question. One last note: Everything is a compromise, there are few moments of perfection in a project. Only you can decide how much you are wiling to compromise and if you let anybody else decide that for you, I guarantee you will not be happy with your project when it is done. That said, I suggest you set yourself a time table because nothing is more important than time in our lives. There are just too many things to do and when you think you won't be challenged by things pulling for your time, that is when you will get a wake up call. Get your bike done in your time table or you may never complete it. When I first started painting cars when I was a kid, I was seriously disappointed. No matter how hard I tried, I could only see the imperfections. but.....almost nobody else did, and after a few years I grew to love the cars I had painted and I didn't see their flaws any more. When somebody says, "That's beautiful bike", do not iterate the slight imperfections in your mind. Respect what they have told you because their perspective is better than yours. They got a feeling when they say your bike is beautiful and it made them feel good to express it, so don't take that away from them.

Now, I always get too long winded but I think it's a nice model. There is something very pleasant about a bike that can be made to run correctly that doesn't go to warp speed in a few seconds. You get to work the gears more, you get to perfect the corners to keep up. I highly respect the guys around here on their cafe racer builds. Underestimating them is a mistake. They hit the apex on a corner you miss and it makes their day.
 

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Hello

"It's always funner to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slowly...."
-Anonymous
 
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