Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Folks,
I have a 2006 Ducati Sportclassic 1000. I am unhappy with how easily the bike drops into a turn...when compared with my VFr1200f which is probably 80kg heavier, the Sportclassic turns with much more difficulty.

What can I do to improvemthis ? Is there an adjustment to the forks or suspension that can improve this ?
Thanks in advance


Sent from my Motorcycle iPad app
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
The slow heavy steering is a trait of every Ducati I've ever ridden and you just get used to it, in contrast I now find some other bikes to be nervous and unstable.

If your really unhappy you could consider dropping the yokes down the forks slightly but you need to be fairly cautious when doing this as you may end up with something that doesn't handle as well as it should.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,436 Posts
For years it was the way of Ducati, slower steering but higher stability, much out of necessity because of the layout of the front cylinder.
On the sport 1000, new rims and tires with a different profile make a world of difference, pilot pures on mine. Turns in much easier than the stock phantoms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
There are two areas that will change your handling as you would like. One is to raise the rear and the other is to lower the front. Actually three I guess as a combination of the two is an alternative. I prefer to start in the rear because it does not compromise ground clearance. It may not be possible with out buying a new shock so lowering the front is the easiest and cheapest just watch out you do not go too far too fast for it will both increase the twitchiness and reduce ground clearance.

I would recommend marking your fork tubes with something like a Sharpie. Then doing only one side at a time loosen the upper triple clamp, the lower triple clamp and the clip ons. Move the fork up higher in the triple clamps by 5 mm and lock down all three pieces. Repeat on the other side and go for a ride. Ride a familiar road and do not push it at first. Get a feel for what you have done and see if it is moving in the direction you want.

The process I like to employ is 5 mm increments until I go too far and then back up about half and see if that is what I like. I also find that after I make a modification like this the bike seem twitchy for several rides and then all of a sudden it feel right or even sluggish and I make another change. It is all about personal feel so work on it until you are happy.

Ultimately you may need to get a shock that has ride height adjustment is you run out of ground clearance.

Jim
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,088 Posts
Better tires and tubeless wheels will help this dramatically. The forged 999r wheels I recently added are night and day.
 

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,133 Posts
Before you drop the fork in the TC be sure you understand the ramifications of doing so. Doing that lessens the effective rake and trail. Under braking compression it will decrease yet more. Too much and the front end can tuck.

Adjusting geometry is not wrong, but it is not something to be done casually.

Better, IMO, is keeping the stock geometry which is twitchy as is. (some claim unstable) and using tire profile to get what you are lookin for.

Ducatis are not designed by amateurs, the steering geometry was carefully chosen.

Lighter wheels by nature create less stabilizing force. The suggestion of getting lighter ones may make sense for you. :)

-don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
I swapped the OEM wheels on my GT1000 (actually it had the SC1000 alloy rims fitted when I bought the bike) for 5-spoke Marchesinis in order to run tubeless tyres. After doing this the bike did appear to have slightly quicker turn-in, perhaps due to the weight reduction - as others have said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I agree with both il Capo and DUCeditor to a degree. I recently raised my forks 10mm (which was recommed as the max amount). I noticed a slight but noticable change in the bike's willingness to turn into a corner. DUCeditor makes a good point in that the Sport 1000 is a little on the "twitchy" side - I also run with a WASP TMSD to reduce this pucker factor. Personally, I like this set-up. Give it a shot and see if the change meets your needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Folks,

This is all great advice.

Now that I remember, I think I did make the front fork and shock adjustments to a KTM 950 SM sometime back and it had made a significant difference. Let me try those and see how that goes.

Just a curiosity question, if one were to consider either a brand new fork or a shock, which would most choose to switch with this effect ? And to what ?

The bike is almost brand new, less than 800 miles on it, so perhaps a bit too early to change tyres... I guess I would get around to doing that too once a new tyre is due.

Many thanks once more for all the advice.

I am a yellow with Zards unbaffled and occasionally do hit Box Hill or the Ace Cafe... hope I bump into some of you there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Folks,

This is all great advice.

Now that I remember, I think I did make the front fork and shock adjustments to a KTM 950 SM sometime back and it had made a significant difference. Let me try those and see how that goes.

Just a curiosity question, if one were to consider either a brand new fork or a shock, which would most choose to switch with this effect ? And to what ?

The bike is almost brand new, less than 800 miles on it, so perhaps a bit too early to change tyres... I guess I would get around to doing that too once a new tyre is due.

Many thanks once more for all the advice.

I am a yellow with Zards unbaffled and occasionally do hit Box Hill or the Ace Cafe... hope I bump into some of you there.
Straight fork swap available from this chap at a decent price, I bought some bits from him a while ago.
SS and ST2 parts for sale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Should bolt straight in, I have a set in my garage that I'll fit whenever it stops raining for more than ten minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
On an IE yes, but your oe brakes will bolt onto these forks as they are the same fitment as many other Ducati models, its only the wire wheels which limit clearance on the standard goldline brembos.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
Beware that stiffer (better?) forks may reduce your turn in.

When I switched from a KTM Superduke to a SuperDuke R - going from 80 - 85nm springs and shims made to stiffen the forks, the bike had much less turn-in on track than before because there was less dive under braking. Changing shims, oil and 80nm springs to allow more dive under breaking restored my track day lines.

Geometry and Tyre choices are the key: New tyres always turn-in better because older tyres have less profile left. So, really pointy track-orientated tyres will give you much more turn in too. (...what tyres are you running and how old are they?)

There is plenty of scope to drop the yokes down the forks (my wife's Biposto has a 25mm drop, and it doesn't appear to bottom-out between fender and bottom yoke), although you may not want to raise the rear on a bike that's quite tall - for some.

So, take 10-15mm out at the front (forks thru yokes), and fit new racy tyres.

Of course lighter wheels will also make a big difference, reducing the gyroscopic force of an unsprung mass, but you'll have to go solid, as even tubeless Alpinas are not much lighter than stock SC alu rims - and it ain't cheap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
....I see you're a Londoner too. You should come by the Landseer pub in N7 once sunny Thursday evening (almost always a crew of cafe racers down there) or hook up at an Italian car & bike day at the Ace.

There are loads of us SC,GT and PS owners in North London between Hoxton & Muswell Hill, and everywhere in between.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Excellent, many thanks, I am going to drop the forks this w/e as a first attempt and will come back with some feedback. The tyres are stock Pirellis and only have 800 miles on them. Once they are run down, they would also be the next thing to change.

See you at the Ace.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
Dude... Those godawful stock Pirelli Phantoms are your main problem. They have a very flat profile and they also wear horribly. Plus they offer no feedback and no grip in the cold and wet.

Change them before you fcuk with the geometry. Please throw them in the bin before you do anything else (or before you crash in the wet on London's slippery roads). Don't wait for them to run down. Please. There are even a few nutters on here who will take them off your hands for that retro look.

See you at the Ace dude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
Excellent, many thanks, I am going to drop the forks this w/e as a first attempt and will come back with some feedback. The tyres are stock Pirellis and only have 800 miles on them. Once they are run down, they would also be the next thing to change.

See you at the Ace.
Your tires are pushing seven years old which is the age some tire manufacturers say is the maximum safe age for a tire. Riding old donuts until "the are run down," is false economy if they fail to hold a corner and you go ass over tea kettle. Your bike will handle better and be safer with new, modern tires.They should be the first thing you change. IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
Swapped the OEM fork springs for Hyperpro progressive springs. Also swapped the worn-out OEM tyres for Dunlop Roadsmarts when the 5-spoke Marchesinis were fitted.

This has worked well for me with the kind of riding I do.

Turn-in is fine for me, stability is good & the ride over bumpy roads is more comfortable. Mind you, I'm no Mike Hailwood.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top