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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,
I've just got hold of an rear shock off a IE SS for the slight increase in length. It's been apart and I can't find any rough preload measurements so that I'm in the ballpark when I put it on my 94 900Ss. Does anyone know a good preload measurement to start off with? Once it's installed I'll follow the correct sag procedure etc to tweak it properly for my 70kg weight. Also any recommendations/feedback on the best aftermarket spring if I find it too stiff would be much appreciated.
Also ordered new race tech springs and gold valves for the front....can't wait!
Thanks heaps in advance.
Todd (Tauranga,NZ)
 

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In the manual for the 900SSie year 2001, the preload standard setting specifies a spring lenght of 176mm.

For some reason Ducati specifies a spring lenght of 177mm (+1mm) on the 2002 (last year before the (1000ss). Maybe they used a different spring or something.

If you have the Öhlins rear shock the lenght is 160mm.

In any case a spring lenght of 176-177mm should get you to factory specs if you are using an original spring.

The picture is from the 2001 900SSie owners manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've got the standard (unfortunately non-Ohlins) shock but it's definitely the later model one from an injected bike. ?
 

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2002 is ohlins.
Only on the Supersport, in 2002 they also sold a cheaper spec?ed matte black, non-Öhlins, steel swingarm, non-Brembo Goldline master cylinder version they just called Sport. The 2002 900SSie was spec?ed as the following ds1000ss, including the Öhlins rear shock and fat alu swingarm.
 

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The sachs shock is a good unit only held back by parts availability, they can be freshened and Ohlins springs fit. I would toss the stock dual rate spring and put on an ohlins straight rate for your weight depending on the riders geared up weight, use and preferences you would be between a 7.0 and a 7.5 spring a 7.5 with about 12-15mm preload should give a pretty good ride as well as enhanced handling. A 7.0 will have 15-20mm preload and give more feel/feedback but be harsher over small bumps.

The oem spring being a one size fits all will not be great but setting sag at least sets ride height, same joke about the ie supersports as carbys they were set up for a 100lb rider with his 200lb girlfriend on the back. Setting springs for your weight and circumstance is always worth the money.

My track bike runs a sachs that is sprung for me and it works well enough I have not bothered building buying a "better" shock even though I buy them at cost and often have the used units come up for sale. If you spring the sachs and you later change to a penske or ohlins the same spring you purchaced will move right over, note the oem ohlins still comes with a dual rate spring so even they benefit from a swap.
 

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I have the Öhlins shock on my 2002 900SSie with the standard progressive spring.

I wrote recently to Öhlins and afsked about the specific spring fitted and they replied that it was a progressive spring for a rider weight of between 75-100 kg. I weigh some 90 kg fully geared, so it fits OK.

I have not tried a non-progressive spring, but I feel the rear suspension is working really well. Very plush, but firm at the same time. And I have still not had the suspension set-up for me, but running Öhlins oil in the front forks, standard settings front-rear, I feel the bike really is working well for my weight and street riding. As said, plush, but firm, not harsh and incompliant.
 

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A GP team suspension mechanic from another forum i was a member of, stipulated that you should not add more than 10% pre-load, after that you need a bigger spring rate as teh spring will become too hard.

Support the frame to unload the shock, un-wind the spring completely, measure spring, x length by 0.9 and that figure is you maximum preload length.

Start at +5% (x 0.95) and work up/down from there.
 

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keep in mind that it's ducati ohlins, not ohlins ohlins. they made whatever ducati specified. even if they though it was stupid.
I don't understand this argument. If you go to the Ohlins web product page for motorcycles, all shocks and forks are made for a specific brand and model and the price for the DU235 is on level with any other similar street shock made for other brands and models.

And the product page for the DU235 does not indicate any inferior quality for this shock.

https://www.ohlins.eu/en/products/motorcycle/du-235--4049/

Do you have any facts about the DU235 indicating that it is not made according to normal Ohlins standards used for normal road shocks?

Furthermore, the DU235 is made from the generic Ohlins S46PRCL shock, which is offered for many other brand and models. For Ducati it is named DU235, for Suzuki it is SU606 and so on.

As a street shock, it may not be as sophisticated as a shock made for the track, but sophistication and quality are different matters. A shock can be simple, but made of quality parts. This is what I expect the DU235 to be, relatively simple, but made of standard quality Ohlins parts.
 

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Yes there are oem Ohlins and there are aftermarket Ohlins. Ohlins cannot sell oem Ohlins but are allowed to make aftermarket Ohlins this is a agreement between the companies NOT a change in quality.

Note the DU2350 ( and DU2450 and DU2451) is a carby aftermarket shock and is different from the oem DU102 1000ss shock, quite a number of differences. These differences are more about the era the shock was designed for than the quality of parts, earlier shocks have older designs that often can be updated but unless you need to there will be little gain. Biggest reason I update is the older shafts are no longer made so you simply use a few different parts to get the shock back up and running. At the same time some times the shock length is changed the DU102 has more length available to it (four mm) so if you are trying to get the longest shock these are the oem shocks you want though the DU2350 could be made longer as well it would mean more parts/labor.
 

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I don't understand this argument. If you go to the Ohlins web product page for motorcycles, all shocks and forks are made for a specific brand and model and the price for the DU235 is on level with any other similar street shock made for other brands and models.

And the product page for the DU235 does not indicate any inferior quality for this shock.

https://www.ohlins.eu/en/products/motorcycle/du-235--4049/

Do you have any facts about the DU235 indicating that it is not made according to normal Ohlins standards used for normal road shocks?

Furthermore, the DU235 is made from the generic Ohlins S46PRCL shock, which is offered for many other brand and models. For Ducati it is named DU235, for Suzuki it is SU606 and so on.

As a street shock, it may not be as sophisticated as a shock made for the track, but sophistication and quality are different matters. A shock can be simple, but made of quality parts. This is what I expect the DU235 to be, relatively simple, but made of standard quality Ohlins parts.
misinterpret much?

eric said it better. oem ohlins, where the oem specifies the damping and spring, and ohlins with damping and spring as decided by ohlins.

my ohlins importer has said more than once that the ducati valving is sometimes strange (or something like that, maybe less kind).

ive been told that in the late 80's ducati specified the damping and spring rates for a marzocchi shock, that marzocchi questioned in writing. ducati ignored the recommendation, then a year later tried to sue marzocchi for damage caused (cracking swingarms, etc) by inappropriate damping and spring rates.
 

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Well, so what you “know” is that Ducati specified the valving. Maybe. OK.

Your post, to me, clearly sounded like you implied that the shock was not usual Öhlins quality. If that was not your intention, I’m sorry.
 
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