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Discussion Starter #1
(Top two images) I've not seen this seat/rear fender ensemble before. Anyone know what it is? Among other things the tail light flows into near invisibility ... love how the lines of the back piece flow in with the lines of the rear subframe as well ... the shape on the sides of the rear piece also flow well with the carve-outs on the sides of the stock fuel tank ... really REALLY nice looking 1990s SS, classy for sure! ... clean, no nonsense, well proportioned, straight to the point.

(bottom image) and is that belly pan just another run of the mill unit? Is there one that is ~best~ (better constructed, or perhaps fits better, and so on)? I'm not totally sold on a belly pan just yet ... but it's a maybe. Maybe a maybe ... black? ... color matched? ... dunno ... maybe.

975468
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975470
 

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Really like the first bike, similar to one of mine. Until seeing this pic I would not have realized how much the rear hugger fills up that space. Anyone know if that is an aftermarket seat/tail? I imagine it is a custom.

edit* found it


The last pic has a chin spoiler, not a race approved oil catch pan, and I have seen them in a few places. Universal ones should fit with a little modification, the challenge is the mounting brackets have to be made yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Really like the first bike, similar to one of mine. Until seeing this pic I would not have realized how much the rear hugger fills up that space. Anyone know if that is an aftermarket seat/tail? I imagine it is a custom.
I know, right? !!! I don't believe I've seen that tail before on any other SS. I'm hoping it's not a custom piece. If so, I'll go back to Aerotech and spend more time digging through all of their tailpieces to see if something similar can be retrofitted to my CR. I really like how ~stumpy~ and short it is, while still maintaining nicely flowing lines that work with the SS frame and tank.

The last pic has a chin spoiler, not a race approved oil catch pan, and I have seen them in a few places. Universal ones should fit with a little modification, the challenge is the mounting brackets have to be made yourself.
Yuh, I figured ... I'm not totally sold on the whole chin spoiler/belly pan thing ... just something to consider at present. Now that I've got my shop somewhat operational again and the bike moved in there a lot of inspiration is taking hold. I'm always in a state of keeping my self in check in that regard!

Thanks for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
... I mean .. PM or email the source to me if you don't want everyone and his brother getting one ...

:giggle:
 

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Wow, that's gorgeous on a stripped SS. Helps smooth out the transition from the humped up tank to the rear end.
It might even look O.K. on a bike with a CR fairing on it.

However...the price may be a stumbling block. Or maybe something is lost in the transition. I used Google translate:

COST & PRICE EXAMPLES
It goes without saying that shuttering has its legitimate price in the present complexity
itself. For the production of CAD data for stern & seat are at Vonarburg
around 7500.- to apply. Incl. Mold and seat construction starts with the price
about 14500.-. The ones described here
Parts for the Ducati 900 SS are ready to install and painted from 2900.- to
to have. Contact: www.vonarburg.co
3000 Marks would be a little over $1500.00...o_O
 

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I think I'd rather buy $500.00 worth of supplies and learn to make a mold and lay one up in fiberglass myself!
.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think I'd rather buy $500.00 worth of supplies and learn to make a mold and lay one up in fiberglass myself!
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OUCH! No kidding! Damn .. $1500 ... pffft ... it's pretty, but not THAT pretty!

I learned some of that stuff in the 1990s when I was going to build a Long EZ (an airplane). Using something like a ~lost foam~ method would probably be the simplest way to go about it. You make a foam tailpiece, sanding it and shaping it to suit your tastes, then lay up fiberglass on the foam piece. Once the fiberglass sets up, you use gasoline to dissolve the foam core, leaving the fiberglass ~shell~ intact. If two or more pieces are needed (such as a top and a bottom) you just use the same process to make both halves, then bond them together using any number of processes to do so. If the whole thing turns out crappy ... start over. Using 2 inch thick sheets of foam along with aerosol spray-on insulation foam glued together to make thick blocks is easy as well. Generally contact cement may be used to glue smaller pieces together to make larger chunks, all of which is dissolved with gasoline once the outer fiberglass shell layups are done.

It's really just another skill that isn't any more difficult to learn than welding or painting bodywork, or doing bodywork/repairs. It's kinda like working with really soft wood. Materials aren't exceedingly costly either. Most components can be obtained at boat shops or marine supply vendors on line.
 
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