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Discussion Starter #1
i've had the heat shield off for a while now and not noticing the difference so now i'm ready to cut the lugs off but i can't decide the best way to approach this and leave no evidence of the lugs at all with least risk of marking the pipes.

i'm intending to buy a bench grinder and put a buffing wheel on for the finishing touches.

these pipes are ti silmotor half system on my 916
 

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i've had the heat shield off for a while now and not noticing the difference so now i'm ready to cut the lugs off but i can't decide the best way to approach this and leave no evidence of the lugs at all with least risk of marking the pipes.

i'm intending to buy a bench grinder and put a buffing wheel on for the finishing touches.

these pipes are ti silmotor half system on my 916
Yep, grinder and finish from there, and I've thought the same thing, but the value of the part effectively becomes zero unless you find someone who doesn't mind, so I've held off...
 

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Depending on what kind of tools you have, If only a bench grinder you’ll need a couple different grit wheels (or start with fine and take lots of time) plus the polishing wheel. If you have a Die Grinder (and a steady hand) along with a cut-off wheel it will make pretty quick work of it removing the bulk of it. A quick change sanding disc (Roloc, Enco, Eastwood or?) with a few different grits, 120, 240, 320 to get the rough scratches out, then smooth the surface with a DeBurring wheel which should remove the rest of the course scratches. Check out use-enco.com or eastwood, or even your local hardware store.

A bit of an investment for a one time thing, but to make it invisible with less work and frustration I think it’s your best approach. It will take a little time for the color to change to match the surrounding metal as you know - (unless the exhaust is polished and you match that with polishing) to become invisible if done well.

Hope this helps….
 

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thanks for the suggestions, i've got no electric tools at the moment but thinking the money i save doing the removal and polishing the whole pipe will cover the cost of the bench grinder and maybe a little toward a dremel or die grinder.

otherwise i was wondering if an oxy might do the trick and just undo the weld so i still had the lugs for reversing might be an option.
 

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thanks for the suggestions, i've got no electric tools at the moment but thinking the money i save doing the removal and polishing the whole pipe will cover the cost of the bench grinder and maybe a little toward a dremel or die grinder.

otherwise i was wondering if an oxy might do the trick and just undo the weld so i still had the lugs for reversing might be an option.
I'm a dremel FREAK, have corded and cordless varieties and if you use some inginuity there isn't a lot you can't do with one. I'm constantly at Canadian Tire looking for new things to add to the kits. A Dremel in my hands at least could get this job done start to finish (save sanding for polish and I'd probably want to buff with something bigger/more consistent than a Dremel)...no bench grinder required:)

edit: I avoid torches like the plague, so I can't help there, sorry:(
 

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thanks for the suggestions, i've got no electric tools at the moment but thinking the money i save doing the removal and polishing the whole pipe will cover the cost of the bench grinder and maybe a little toward a dremel or die grinder.

otherwise i was wondering if an oxy might do the trick and just undo the weld so i still had the lugs for reversing might be an option.
Actually I never really “Think” electric…. “oops”…. since I have air Die grinders (smaller), but that also assumes one has a compressor -- another oops... The attachments you can use and that are available for Die grinders are plenty, same as a Dremal just on a larger scale, and yes the die grinder is more powerful. Great tool and can do a lot with it. If you use a Dremal or Die grinder to just cut the weld off to retain the fitting all the better then just blend the area with mix of sanding attachments.

I’d stay away from the oxy/acetylene as you’ll most likely do more damage then good before the weld even puddles, might even burn through the pipe. They were welded with Tig or Mig which keeps the intense heat concentrated to one small area of the weld while the oxy/acetylene heats everything up in the general area.
 

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:eek: Keep your torch away from those thin wall Ti [email protected][email protected]#!1

You're better off wrapping some tape around one end of a bi-metal hacksaw blade as a handle, and cutting off the tab and as much of the weld bead as you can. Yellow Blur's first response was right on, in my opinion. If you don't have a tool that will spin a cut off disc, then spend the elbow grease doing it with a hack saw.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks guys, good call on the oxy i'll stay away from that, i never even thought of a hacksaw, not really an option, they remove too much material. no i think the electric cutter is the go. although it would be nice to make the leap straight to pnumatic since i have no electric legacy to consider. i've found a good power tool shop locally so i'll have a chat with them.

thanks again
 
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