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I just took my bike in for its 600 mile service and after we got home from picking it up my wife said "You're buying a stand and the shop manual. I'm not making the drive again." I guess a 3 hour round trip was too much...maybe we shouldn't have gone during rush hour.

At least I have a couple months until the next service. Any suggestion or hints for performing the bigger services?
 

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At least I have a couple months until the next service. Any suggestion or hints for performing the bigger services?
The next few services aren't that big of a deal. Need to learn to do valve
clearances and timing belt tensioning. I would get the TechnoResearch
VDST diagnostic scan too, as a minimum ($195). A gauge setup for
synchronizing throttle bodies is a good one to have, then the exhaust gas
analyzer for measuring CO percentage in the exhaust (another tuning tool),
but most guys get by without that.

Ducati dealers do belt tension with a frequency meter (the belt vibrates at
a higher frequency as tension is increased), but there are other methods
documented on this forum.

They do sell service manual CDs on EBay for around $15... don't say you
heard it here.
 

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Swodi,
Could you tell me how much your service cost, and what they did?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Swodi,
Could you tell me how much your service cost, and what they did?
Thanks
It came to $258 after tax, and that included all the normal stuff as well as changing out the front sprocket for a 14 tooth. To be honest, I'm not sure what all else they did. I'll have to check the invoice and get back to you. Considering it's a Ducati AND they changed out the front sprocket, I'm pretty happy.
 

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The 600 mile service is nothing other than an oil/filter change and a check of a few other things. It's all in your manual. This is why I do all my own maintenance.... basically, up until you hit the first valve clearance check at 7500 miles, you don't need to do a whole lot other than change the oil, check your chain tension and keep an eye on your tires.

It's really pretty straight forward stuff... although I've been (generally due to lack of $$ when younger) doing all my own maintenance on anything motorized since I was 14. Find someone near you willing to show you the ropes if you're not sure about anything.
 

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I just got my 600 mi service done, it cost $158. All they really did was an oil/filter change and tighten all the bolts throughout the frame/forks, etc.
They had a special tool for removing the oil filter, does anyone have that, or is it really not necessary when I do my next oil change myself?
 

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my wife said "You're buying a stand and the shop manual."
Lucky dog! Looks like you got one of those women that really understands men. I suggest that you take this opportunity to do some serious tool uprgrading. The door is open, my friend!
 

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better start buying specialty tools.
There's nothing special about the tools you need to do routine maintenance on a Duc. Aside from some allen wrenches, which I hardly consider specialty items, you don't need anything other than oil and filters to get an oil change done. There are a million different oil filter wrenches you can get at the local auto parts store that'll fit a Ducati oil filter, and if you switch to K&N filters you won't even need those anymore.

Beyond that, it's just a metric bike. If you've been working on Jap bikes, there's no real difference. When you get into checking valves things get a bit more complicated, but it's a unique engine design, so that's hardly a surprise. And anyone that can't change their own oil shouldn't be going near their engine internals.
 

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You really should buy her a tee shirt at the dealer for driving the car back for you. I'll take her shopping in the big city after dropping off the bike...Stores like Canadian Tire, Princess Auto and a couple other bike shops. Then its off to the Scottish restaurant for some fine dining ,something along the line of a Big Mac. Large fries and a Strawberry shake.
 

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you forgot to feed her didnt you
girls are always grumpy if they are hungry
 

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Dude, you get to buy tools!

She couldn't possibly have any idea of what is actually needed, right! Sieze the Day, I say!

Table lift, huge honkin' 2 stage air compressor... you finish the list.

Lucky Dog!
+1.. sounds like you just got a blank check to buy tools. Do let people tell you the maintanace on a 2v ducati is difficult..... Its not! the only engines in the world that are more simple would be harley's and 2 strokes.
Have fun! I love working on my bikes. Not sure I could lets someone else turn a wrench on her unless it was something really major.
 

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is there a way to turn of the service gauge (little wrench) without the stealership?
Yes, the TechnoResearch VDST will turn off the service wrench. This is a
PC tool, so you need a laptop or a Palm, or even access to a desktop in your
garage. Or, you can learn to ignore the wrench icon (at least it is small
and non-blinking!). :rolleyes: It's good to have friends with Hypers-- then
you can split the cost of things like the VDST and time share it (since it only
gets used at tune-up time).
 

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Maintenance is an area I'm interested in. I own a trials bike and do all my own maintenance - but no valve adjustments on a 2 stroke. A guy at work said he tried doing it on his duc and gave up. Is it that hard? Anyone have a procedure online for me to look at?
Thanks,
Dean
 

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I recommend one of these... wife bought it for my birthday, use it all the time to do maintenance on my bikes, sure beats lying on the garage floor trying to get under a bike to change oil or adjust chain, etc. Side rails can be used for atv's or riding lawn mowers, etc. or just leave them off like I do. It also acts as bike storage to leave more floor space.
 

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