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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.

I picked up a track bike last week from a local Ducatista that works at MotoCorsa in Portland who purchased it from a previous GM, Arun. Apparently they took a number of different insurance totals and put a nice bike together. From the looks of it, it was built around 2010 or so.

It's a 916 chassis with Ohlins forks from a 1098S, Ohlins shock from a 998, Ohlins steering damper. At one point it had the RS magnesium swingarm, it's back to stock now but the steering tube is still adjusted to the steeper angle. All of the accessory electronics have been removed, no lights, no horn, etc. The front and rear subframes have been replaced with aluminum race pieces.

The motor is a 1000DS from a Multi, rebuilt from the crank up by a local certified Ducati Master Mechanic, whom I know and trust. Lightened and polished crank, lightened primaries, 98mm Pistal pistons, Ti rods, DP cams, pod filters, etc. It's running the stock Multistrada ECU/dash with a Power Commander for tuning.

My personal Ducati history is with a 1994 900SS that I've done a good bit of work on resto-modding. My "daily" rider is a 2017 Supersport that I've been having the dealership maintain for warranty reasons. I'm fairly mechanically dispositioned with Ducati motorcycles, but I've never worked on the superbike chassis, nor have I worked with a fuel injected motor. I feel like I'm going to have questions that I almost know the answers to.


My first question is about the fuel loop to the injectors. When I pulled the tank off yesterday to do some cleaning and familiarize myself with what was going on, I found that the external sheathing on the fuel lines was seriously compromised, exposing the internal steel braided interior. Obviously they need to be replaced. In looking at the routing of the lines it seems like it's a simple loop from the pump, serially through the injectors, then back to the tank. I didn't see one externally so I have to assume there's some sort of pressure regulator built into the return line in the tank?

Does the order in which the fuel injectors are fed matter?

How do I remove those crimped on metal fittings on the fuel lines? Can I use normal hose clamps or t-clamps when I reassemble?

Is there any merit in splitting the fuel line to run in parallel to the injectors, or is there enough system pressure that it's not necessary?

Thanks all!
 

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Congrats what should be a fun bike!

I didn't see one externally so I have to assume there's some sort of pressure regulator built into the return line in the tank?
Assuming 916 style tank the regulator is in the fuel pump flange (large aluminum bit on the bottom of the tank.

Does the order in which the fuel injectors are fed matter?
Not at all as the regulator is in the tank the external bits will always be regulated. Think of the regulator as a dam, the dam always has to be after the injectors to hold steady pressure. either hook up on the 916 tank will give the same pressure.

How do I remove those crimped on metal fittings on the fuel lines? Can I use normal hose clamps or t-clamps when I reassemble?
Cut them off with side cutters, I do use oetiker clamps for replacements. smooth lined hose clamps will work if room permits.

Is there any merit in splitting the fuel line to run in parallel to the injectors, or is there enough system pressure that it's not necessary?
That would not be any benefit that I can think of.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I took some photos last week with the fairings and tank removed. Came with 3.5 sets of fairings, all race fairings, one set is new white gel-coat fiberglass, two sets painted and pretty beat up. The half set is carbon fiber with an RS seat and lowers, the upper fairing was crashed and kept as a memento by the previous owner. The "Airbox" is a plastic 748RS part sans the bottom half, which is the perfect application for this project. Came with two tanks, neither pictured - one is the steel tank, the other is a carbon/kevlar piece that wasn't prepped properly before it got painted, so now the paint is peeling off in hard flakes.

Upon taking off the tank I found the fuel lines were rotted down to the inner sheathing, and that doesn't look very healthy either. I'm glad I didn't have a battery in it and try starting it up, I'd hate to see what happened when that line pressurized.

The engine was coated in burned on oil because the STM breather didn't have a gasket and was barely hand tight, the breather tube was the only thing keeping it from backing out of the case. The breather "box" is pretty hilarious - old school K&N filter on the end of the hose inside the MSR bottle, but also effective, there was about 2 ounces of really ugly oil in the bottom of that MSR bottle. The back side of the clutch slave was coated in grime, I'm pretty sure the o-rings on the clutch rod are bad, but I'm not convinced the STM slave isn't also a contributor to the problem. The ECU is installed in the battery box and the battery box is modified to take one of those tiny Shorai batteries (which didn't come with the bike).

My plan is to keep the pod filters and clean that whole side of the bike up by relocating a new Lithium battery inside the "airbox" by the steering head and moving the regulator either under the seat, or up in front of the airbox.

Came with BST's for the front and rear. The rear is already on the bike, the front is off the bike because the rotors needed 5mm spacers to convert from the 916 front to the 1098 forks, which I now have. In the mean time it has a forged Marchesini M10R on the front. Exhaust is a hand made pie-cut steel adapter from the heads to meet up with the OE 916 steel exhaust and Termi cans.













 

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Man o man...this used to be my dream bike...a 916 chassis with a big Desmodue in it.

You'll have some fun with that for sure...;)
 

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Cool bike almost did this with my 746/853 but stayed with my air cooled SS.
Your vent setup needs a redo, it needs to vent some how to the atmosphere either back to the air box or a small vent tube off the bottle ! if that bottle is closed your not venting the crankcase and pressure has built up that's why its all over the cases.
I had pods filters on my 748 it lost HP when I did the piston kit to 853 and went back to a single and velocity stacks.
Can you adjust the streeing neck with this bike or did they put inserts in to adjust the rake?
Plus one on cleaning up the air box.
Nice catch with the fuel lines! Stay with the stock ECU and power commander,
looks like all the hard work has been done.
Should bike a killer bike on the track,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Cool bike almost did this with my 746/853 but stayed with my air cooled SS.
Your vent setup needs a redo, it needs to vent some how to the atmosphere either back to the air box or a small vent tube off the bottle ! if that bottle is closed your not venting the crankcase and pressure has built up that's why its all over the cases.
I had pods filters on my 748 it lost HP when I did the piston kit to 853 and went back to a single and velocity stacks.
Can you adjust the streeing neck with this bike or did they put inserts in to adjust the rake?
Plus one on cleaning up the air box.
Nice catch with the fuel lines! Stay with the stock ECU and power commander,
looks like all the hard work has been done.
Should bike a killer bike on the track,
The bottle has the end cut off, so it's getting atmosphere. They weren't stupid, just silly. :) The oil all over the crank case was from the breather valve being installed hand tight with no gasket. I've got to believe that's an issue created sometime after the build.

It has the adjustable steering neck.

The problem with the fuel line was routing too close to the rear exhaust. I'll whip up a heat shield and attach it to the rear valve cover, the hot side will have some of that aerospace gold reflective and fiberglass matt. It'll be about 6" from the header, but will keep the lines cool and out of the way.

I still feel like it could be tidied up more which is what I'll be doing this winter, but yes, all the hard work is done.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've been puttering around, cleaning things up, taking things apart and cleaning them, etc. The aluminum rear subframe is quite attractive without the layer of blow by, tire nugs and chain goop. The exhaust cleaned up nicely with a little soap and water, I think I even have a Termi sticker on the shelf to replace the one peeling off.

The gore on the left side was a combination of engine oil from the breather with no gasket and the clutch rod o-rings being worn flat. All three o-rings replaced, hopefully it starts holding oil again.

Replaced the rashed clutch cover with a Woodcraft cover appropriately aged and faded that matches the patina of the rest of the bike nicely.

The bike also came with a carbon/kevlar tank that had a massive paint peel issue. I spent a few hours today peeling and chipping paint, I'm hopeful it will clean up and be pinhole free, then get it painted. It's significantly lighter than the steel tank.

I'm methodically working my way down to getting the suspension out for servicing and springs to match my weight.

I did notice one of the rivets is popped on the exhaust end can straps. If I'm not mistaken, these are vented and designed specifically for motorcycle exhausts, but I'm not sure where to pick one up.











 

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Coming along nicely!
some race fuels are pretty tough on rubber if your fuel lines were near the pods and the bike was running a boutique race gas that could contribute to the hose cracking. I think I have the same carbon /kevlar tank anyway you might check out efi fuelcel thats who made mine. Great tank and crash tested! very repairable.

I personally would not ever put a lithium battery anywhere i could not quickly and easily remove it. stock location is fine moving into the airbox hole might add more heat to the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Puttering along on this thing slowly. The metal tank sprung a leak at the rear mount, and on closer inspection it's apparent this isn't the first time it's happened. The kevlar tank isn't ready to take fuel yet and rather than risk further issues with makeshift patching I picked up another steel tank on fleabay.

Swapped the pump over and so far it seems to hold fuel just fine and has the superior Ducati logo to boot. I don't have the key to the cap for the "new" tank, so I exchanged it for the Lightech bayonette style filler cap from the old one. It leaks when inverted or sloshed. Is there some way these are supposed to seal to the tank flange like the SS bikes do?

I whipped up a seat mount bracket for the end of the rear subframe. The bike came with a huge hunk of poorly welded steel that broke when I tried cleaning it up. Bent up some aluminum, added a couple of 6mm wellnuts for an old SS fairing, and voila, an extra pound saved.

It took me WAY too long to figure out what was going on here. Then I laughed my ass off when I did.
 

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Puttering along on this thing slowly. The metal tank sprung a leak at the rear mount, and on closer inspection it's apparent this isn't the first time it's happened. The kevlar tank isn't ready to take fuel yet and rather than risk further issues with makeshift patching I picked up another steel tank on fleabay.

Swapped the pump over and so far it seems to hold fuel just fine and has the superior Ducati logo to boot. I don't have the key to the cap for the "new" tank, so I exchanged it for the Lightech bayonette style filler cap from the old one. It leaks when inverted or sloshed. Is there some way these are supposed to seal to the tank flange like the SS bikes do?

I whipped up a seat mount bracket for the end of the rear subframe. The bike came with a huge hunk of poorly welded steel that broke when I tried cleaning it up. Bent up some aluminum, added a couple of 6mm wellnuts for an old SS fairing, and voila, an extra pound saved.

It took me WAY too long to figure out what was going on here. Then I laughed my ass off when I did.
Nice Fix on the seat latch,,,, I am at total loss as to what's with up the safety wired thing? Fairing mount maybe? ?
 

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Yes the bike has an imobilizer that is still working so they needed to have the antenna sense the key is there. Remove the immobilizer and that can go away, worth doing.

I also noticed your picture of the leaking tank looks like someone "modified" it as the bottom of the tank should not be bulged out. Almost like the tank was caved in and they tried to push a dent out with air and the bottom expanded.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes the bike has an imobilizer that is still working so they needed to have the antenna sense the key is there. Remove the immobilizer and that can go away, worth doing.

I also noticed your picture of the leaking tank looks like someone "modified" it as the bottom of the tank should not be bulged out. Almost like the tank was caved in and they tried to push a dent out with air and the bottom expanded.
Is the immobilizer built in to the ECU or is it a standalone device? How do I remove it?

The bulge is just a trick of the photograph. I think you're seeing the baggie containing the pump flange, drain, and cap bolts taped to it so I don't lose them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, to make a long story short, she's back together. I replaced the tank with another, purchased locally. It doesn't look any better, but it holds gas like a champ!

I wanted to inspect the swingarm bearings, and by the time I got to them I realized that the only thing keeping me from powder coating the frame was disconnecting the wiring harness. Off it came, and off the frame, swingarm and lower triple went to get some nice color. I tried to match the dark gold of the magnesium covers on the DS motor, but it came out a shade more silver. Still looks nice though, and now it all just wipes clean which is what I really wanted. The frame was done in a silver that came out vaguely pink, but looks nice and bright compared to the dark grey of the 996. Unfortunately I got about 15 of my very slow hours into assembly before I discovered the clearcoat was not adhering to the base coat. I may pull it apart again next winter and get it re-done.

With the rear hub out I took the time to clean it out and repack the wheel bearings, touch up the carrier and scrub the rear caliper. As it went back together it got fresh swingarm bearings, spacers and seals, serviced shock and 1098 forks, matching monoblock brakes, fresh steering head bearings, adjustable ride height linkage, then rotor and axle spacers to fit the 996 BST to the 1098 fork. I might miss the 330mm rotors, but it'll be fine.


The bike came with a pair of no-name rearsets that didn't have (or have a provision for) heel guards and the exhaust had the burn marks to prove it. Those were replaced with a pair from Woodcraft, which look excellent.

I spent the last week wiring the bike with the Multi 1000ds harness that it came with from the donor bike that supplied the motor. The previous build had the stepper/IAC just kind of plugged in, but not plumbed to the throttle bodies. The nipples on the throttlebodies were capped, but the bike didn't idle very well. I whipped up a bracket out of 3mm aluminum to mount it between the TB's similar to how the DS Supersport does it. The other thing I didn't like was how the battery tray just kind of flopped around on the two screws holding it to the frame, so I added a bracket (also 3mm aluminum) off an unused M10 hole on the front head over to the aluminum bracket that carries the RR, and used a rubber well nut between them to help isolate vibrations.

The harness went in with a little bit of finagling, the only issue was making the mistake of running the ECU ground to the battery ground which caused the fuel injector relay to click incessantly. Once that was corrected, she started right up and ran like a champ.

 

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Sorry to not have checked for the reply. Your immobilizer is in your ecu and can be shut off/removed with software. I am not sure if you will be able to run without the dash as you may have a sensor in the dash you need but it would at least allow you to ditch the keys and buy a used dash off ebay if something happens on the track.
 
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