Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
DISCLAIMER I am not responsible for your results, positive or negative, nor any damages resulting from your negligence or repairs. This has been posted in hopes of helping those who wish to service their own forks.

So, I performed a rudimentary search of the forum for DIY on 2009 hypermotard 1100 S fork service/oil change etc and yielded negative results. (Ymmv)

So here goes nothing...
I’ve been mostly working from home lately and have taken on a plethora of projects from a basement remodel to Moto-related items both car and bikes.
Ok; shut it and get to the point.

Track 848 has a great how-to video but our hypers have several steps which are different. I’ve highlighted and attempted to document what I could with the accompanying pictures.

First, prep your area, workspace, tools and materials.

I chose and prepared the following:

  • Motul synthetic 7.5wt fork oil (2 liters).
  • 3/8” torque wrench
  • Digital calipers for fork height measurement
  • Ratcheting open end wrenches 8mm
  • Hex/Allen sizes #4; 6 & 8
  • 30mm socket for fork caps
  • 28mm socket for wheel nut
  • 3/8” and 1/2” ratchets and extensions
  • Bungees for holding brake calipers
  • Brushes for cleaning
  • Painters/masking tape
  • Shop rags
  • Wheel grease of your choice
  • Measuring cup/apparatus

Some form of front and rear stands; I have pitbull ssa and front triple stands to work with. You will need to lift the front end without loading the suspension components in order to perform this service.

Once prepped and ready, the first actual working step is to remove the beak/front fairing stay. These are held in place by 6 - #4 hex bolts with 4 located on the back side of the housing and two on each lower sides of the beak.

992444


I have a puig windscreen installed which came in to play so I removed the handlebars using hex/Allen #8 to clear the screen and gain access to the fork caps for later.

I also marked my bars for reinstallation with tape.

992445


992446



992451


This will allow access to speedo and headlight housing removal in order to get to the top pinch bolts.

992449


You may be able to gain access without this step but I could not.

First remove the 3 - 8mm nuts holding the speedo cluster. There’s one right up front just above the headlight and two hidden nuts toward the rear:

992452


992453
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Continued due to attachment limits...

Once these are removed, you can carefully move the speedo cluster to one side at a time to gain access to two #4 headlight housing retaining bolts.

992454


Once removed, you may manipulate the housing in order to access the top pinch bolts #6 hex/Allen

NOTE Before completely loosening any of the pinch bolts, loosen the fork caps 2-3 rotations using the 30mm socket. Just enough to allow hand loosening later once the fork is removed from the bike.

At this point, I took measurements of fork height using my calipers (amount of fork exposed beyond the top triple) and marking their position in the lower yokes, for alignment later, using more tape.

992455


At this point I removed the brakes, front fender, and wheels (these are well-documented so I won’t list these steps) taking care to note which side the spacer(s) are located.

992456


992457


I removed all the wheel components and reassembled them off of the bike to keep them in the proper order.

I used the bungees hang the brake calipers away from the forks and wheel.

Use care removing the fender; S models are carbon fiber and not cheap to replace.

Now, loosen all the pinch bolts and slide the fork down through the triple and yoke.

992458


992459


Time for fork service; loosen the fork cap taking care to hold both portions from separating and spilling your fork oil all over your work space.

When completely loosened, pour out the fluid in to a measuring cup (whatever you choose) I wanted to measure the amount to replace and note how much was in each fork.

If changing seals, springs or full cartridge, this step will vary

My seals were still fresh so I kept them and opted to simply change fluid.

Tip the fork tube and empty:

992460


992461


My fluid was filthy; but here comes the good stuff.

992462
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
If its not to late, use 2.5W fork oil.
If you have the original cartridges is the S, this will soften the high speed damping and improve handling dramatically.
The clickers will pick up the l;ow speed compression.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Close up the fork by hand tightening the cap until just snug.

Cycle the fork several times by bouncing it up and down with body weight taking care to protect the lower fork legs with shop towels (I used foam flooring and towels)

Repeat the emptying process by tipping the fork tube again. Cycle 3-6 times until there’s little to no fluid dripping out.

Get the good stuff ready. I chose motul synthetic as I have great success with their synthetic motor oils.

992463


I replaced same amount (500ml) in the fork. There’s discussion of 480-490ml or measurement of air gap and distance to top of tube. I opted to simply exchange fluid volume in order to have as direct a comparison to the prior fork performance as I could by keeping it simple.


Slowly pour the oil in to the tube to prevent air bubbles forming. I poured 3/4 and closed up the tube. Cycled it several times and poured the rest of the fluid in before hand tightening the fork cap to just snugged down.

That’s it! The installation is reverse order; simply snug all bolts after properly positioning and aligning the fork back in to the triple and yoke.

Torquing procedures and figures are listed all over the forum

I’ll credit
piarjr for the following:

992466


The process is exactly the same for the other side.

992465


Once everything is reinstalled, snug up each nut and bolt on the forks, brakes and axle.

I cycled the front suspension by grabbing front brake and pushing down hard to settle components.

I torqued bolts to spec, went for a quick ride up and down the block stopping gradually; frequently; then hard braking and doing my best impression of a unicycle ;) before coming back in the garage to re-torque everything once more.

I did note that my fork alignment was slightly off on one side so I went through the whole uninstalling and reinstalling process again and another quick ride to truly settle in the front end.

From just riding up and down the street several times the suspension feels super plush. I’ll likely have to recalibrate my settings but it feels like a completely different bike in a good way!

DISCLAIMER I am not responsible for your results, positive or negative, nor any damages resulting from your negligence or repairs. This has been posted in hopes of helping those who wish to service their own forks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
@GHEZZI

At this point, with everything buttoned up, it is a tad too late this time around.

I had no real qualms with my S suspension other than it would change with temperature or longer and harder riding (twisty and “goaty type” roads for longer than 20-30 miles of technical one lane types). It would get harsh and very bumpy as the ride progressed. These are roads I know very well; have done hundreds of miles on them and the hyper suspension changed character with temperature.

I figured the suspension valving and oil viscosity had broken down to the point performance began to suffer.

If I’m unhappy with this weight viscosity, I’ll try going to 5W and then 2.5 if need be. Right now, it feels silky and I am excited to get her out to my favorite stomping grounds.

What made you decide on 2.5 and what are your details for bike and your weight with riding gear etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
701 Posts
Back in 07 I had an 1100S, handling was woeful. Cartridge kits hadn't been invented. Suspension Guru said my low speed tank slappers were due to high speed compression being too hard!
As the cartridges were sealed units he opted to try lighter oil. From my old faded memory it was 2.5 weight. He set pre-load for rider sag but I cannot remember if fork springs were changed.
Rear Ohlin shock was left unchanged at that point except pre-load for rider sag etc. I am still about 100/105kg dressed for battle.

From there I dialed in the (low speed) compression and rebound one end at a time by riding over the same kilometre of really crap road with a few bends, listing my changes and writing notes on what I was feeling.

Later, I fitted the then new Michelin Pilot Power 2CT, which at the time was leading edge and it really sharpened the steering.
The final adjustment was adding about 8mm rear ride height, measured vertically at the axle.

This bike was an absolute weapon, yet had the suppleness and compliance to ride really fast over the lumpiest roads, you just never had to back off.
Change of direction was insane. No steering damper needed.

Yet, I never arrived at the perfect setting on the Ohlin, I would alternate between two settings with the compression, only 1 click apart.
One setting would feel like there was a little Leprechaun under the seat, going to town with a jack hammer. But ALL big bump handling was exceptional.
The other setting would have the rear perfectly smooth on all the fine corrugations and ripples cruising, but if you hit a depression it would do a half wallow coming out the other side.
These symptoms indicated the rear Ohlin also suffered the same fate of being too hard in the high speed compression damping. But I never got to service the shock.

Three weeks ago I purchased an 08 1100 base model. 5,000 km and not ridden for 6 years. Serviced and registered, rode it for the first time today. Broke down twice.
First time it ran out of fuel, the reserve light does not operate. New thermistor ordered.
Second time the rear brake seized, combination of brand new boots resting on the pedal, not enough free play and it was a bitch to bleed at the service.
Did it all again and cleaned the pistons, it now appears to be working correctly.

Ute loaded for an early start to the Sunshine Coast Hinterland (QLD) tomorrow. No Covid here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Back in 07 I had an 1100S, handling was woeful. Cartridge kits hadn't been invented. Suspension Guru said my low speed tank slappers were due to high speed compression being too hard!
As the cartridges were sealed units he opted to try lighter oil. From my old faded memory it was 2.5 weight. He set pre-load for rider sag but I cannot remember if fork springs were changed.
Rear Ohlin shock was left unchanged at that point except pre-load for rider sag etc. I am still about 100/105kg dressed for battle.

From there I dialed in the (low speed) compression and rebound one end at a time by riding over the same kilometre of really crap road with a few bends, listing my changes and writing notes on what I was feeling.

Later, I fitted the then new Michelin Pilot Power 2CT, which at the time was leading edge and it really sharpened the steering.
The final adjustment was adding about 8mm rear ride height, measured vertically at the axle.

This bike was an absolute weapon, yet had the suppleness and compliance to ride really fast over the lumpiest roads, you just never had to back off.
Change of direction was insane. No steering damper needed.

Yet, I never arrived at the perfect setting on the Ohlin, I would alternate between two settings with the compression, only 1 click apart.
One setting would feel like there was a little Leprechaun under the seat, going to town with a jack hammer. But ALL big bump handling was exceptional.
The other setting would have the rear perfectly smooth on all the fine corrugations and ripples cruising, but if you hit a depression it would do a half wallow coming out the other side.
These symptoms indicated the rear Ohlin also suffered the same fate of being too hard in the high speed compression damping. But I never got to service the shock.

Three weeks ago I purchased an 08 1100 base model. 5,000 km and not ridden for 6 years. Serviced and registered, rode it for the first time today. Broke down twice.
First time it ran out of fuel, the reserve light does not operate. New thermistor ordered.
Second time the rear brake seized, combination of brand new boots resting on the pedal, not enough free play and it was a bitch to bleed at the service.
Did it all again and cleaned the pistons, it now appears to be working correctly.

Ute loaded for an early start to the Sunshine Coast Hinterland (QLD) tomorrow. No Covid here.
This is good info; for me, the stock S model suspension has performed amazingly until the last 3-4K. I started to really notice the harshness was temperature/riding time related hinting that the fluid had started to break down.

I’m fortunate to have a wonderfully technical ride home from work. It allowed me to hone my cornering skills and really pay attention to how my bike behaves at different speeds and road conditions.

Without boring you to death, the first 2/3’s of my route was extremely tight and technical (Calaveras Rd, Milpitas, Ca). Last part (Palomares Rd., Fremont - Castro Valley) being slightly less and I considered it the “cool down” lap.

There’s a section on Palomares that is much bumpier than the rest of that road and if I only road that section, the suspension soaked it up no problem. Meaning I can leave my house and just run end to end of Palomares and not experience the harshness.

However, after romping through the entire route, Calaveras through Palomares then home, the harshness was present. Like the suspension had gotten tired and the viscosity of the fork oil had broken down.

I tweak my suspension occasionally for pillion or not when we have longer trips but have left it alone for the most part.

The Ohlins rear will get some love at some point but I wanted to focus on one end/component at a time to truly grasp the gravity of each change. This is why I want to gradually change viscosity (if needed) after making several runs over the referenced sections.

Sorry to be so long-winded, but I wanted to explain the impetus and my observations.

I appreciate your insight and wish happy riding!

Blu’
 

·
Registered
2008 HyperMotard 1100S
Joined
·
695 Posts
What kind of windshield is that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
What kind of windshield is that?
It’s a Puig windscreen; I actually had it posted for sale in the classifieds but have decided to keep it.
Instead, I have my Fabbri windscreen which is better at wind protection for me but I feel that I prefer the aesthetics of the Puig.
 

·
Registered
2008 HyperMotard 1100S
Joined
·
695 Posts
It’s a Puig windscreen; I actually had it posted for sale in the classifieds but have decided to keep it.
Instead, I have my Fabbri windscreen which is better at wind protection for me but I feel that I prefer the aesthetics of the Puig.
Got it. Thanks for the reply!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Blucati
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top