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This is a how-to guide for performing a "Desmo" service including an oil change, valve check, and timing belt swap. This can apply to pretty much any Desmodue engine. In addition to my how-to, I recommend the use of the LT Snyder book.

Note that I am building this how-to as I go through the work. This is my secondary bike, so it will take me a little bit of time. Additionally, this is my first time through the Hyper, so it may become apparent at some point that the order of something doesn't make sense. I will try my best to make note of these.

Let's get started.
Drain oil. For the Hypermotard EVO, this is a 6mm allen.


Remove oil filter. For K&N style filters, use a 17mm socket.


Replace oil plug including a new crush washer. Install a new oil filter. Rub a dab of oil on the gasket of the new oil filter prior to installation. DO NOT FILL WITH OIL.

Now begins the removal of the tank. Start by removing the seat. This is a 4mm allen.


Remove the two bolts holding the center plastic tank cover. These are 3mm allen.


Remove the gas cap. This will reveal two more bolts that need to be removed. These are 3mm allens.


Remove the center tank cover. Lift the front up first and work your way to the back as the back portion wraps around the tank.


There are 3 bolts holding each side tank cover. These are 4mm allen. Two are visible here. Note the lone bolt screwed into the tank not attached to anything does not have to be removed. This bolt is what holds the seat in place.


And the other here.
 

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Tonight we will continue and remove the fuel tank.

Remove the 4 bolts holding on the bracket. These are 4mm.


Remove the battery.


Remove this bracket which holds various electrical components. This is a 3mm bolt.


You will find several of these metal retainers. They are flexible. Pull the retainer off of the various cables. You do not have to unbolt these.


Disconnect the various electrical connectors that are easily disconnected. This will allow ease of movement of the fuel tank as you pull it out of the bike. The second picture depicts the connectors for the turn signals and license plate light. These all have the same connector style. To prevent troubleshooting when reinstalling, mark them somehow prior to disconnecting.



Remove the two bolts holding the tank in place. These are 4mm.


There is a friction fit at the rear of the tank where my finger points to. Grab underneath the tank towards the rear and lift up to undo the friction fit. This will require some force.
 

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Now the tank is free to move around, but not completely free of the bike.

Lift up the left side of the tank. There are two small clamps that are bolted into the bottom of the gas tank. The clamps are holding fuel lines. Remove the bolts. These are 3mm. Sorry, but my picture of this step didn't turn out. The mentioned bolts and clamps will be evident when you lift the left side of the tank.

Remove the 3 nuts holding the fuel pump cover. These are 8mm. These nuts have a tendency to get crudded up. Sometimes unbolting them results in the stud coming out of the tank instead of the nut coming off of the stud. No worries.


Remove the fuel lines from the fuel pump. Squeeze the outer ring and pull the connection away from the fuel pump. These connections are underneath the cover you just removed. The fuel tank and lines will spill some gas as it empties the fuel pump and lines. I put a rag underneath them as I remove the connections. Once again, my picture didn't turn out.

You will have to snip a wire tie or two to get the fuel pump power cable free. Once you have done this, the tank is completely free and can be removed from the bike.


Now you can begin removing the air box.

Loosen the crankcase breather hose clamp and remove the hose.


Unplug the coil plug that is on mounted to the rear of the air box.


Unplug the spark plug wire associated with the coil mounted on the rear of the air box.


Loosen the hose clamps on the two connections between the air box and the throttle bodies.


Remove the two bolts holding the rear of the air box to the frame. These are 4mm. The right side is easy. The left will require some effort on your part as many things are in the way. I use a 4mm allen on a ratchet wrench with a wobble extension.
 

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Mexican Ducatista
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Hi t-bills,

I am getting to know my recently bought 2008 1100s HM.
Just wanted to let you know that your thread motivates me to roll up the sleeves with a DIY attitude.

Thanks for taking your time to do this.
I can't wait to see it completed.
 

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There is a bolt holding the front of the air box. It is difficult to to get a picture of with the airbox still on. You will probably have to go ahead and relocate the oil cooler to get to it. Last time I took my air box off, I didn't put this particular bolt back in. There is a picture of the location of the bolt as seen once the airbox has been removed.


Disconnect the front coil Unplug the spark plug wire and the power cable to the coil.



There will be two remaining hoses connected to the air box. One is in the front and can be wiggled off. This one is on the back and requires a bit of force. Hold onto it while lifting the air box up to remove it.


Now the air box can be removed from the bike.

If you didn't already, go ahead and relocate the oil cooler. There are 2 4mm bolts holding it in place. Pull the oil cooler down and out of the way.


Remove the spark plugs. These are 5/8".


Remove the belt covers. There are 5 5mm bolts.


Put the bike in 6th gear and use the wheel to rotate the engine until the yellow highlighted dot on the crank pulley is lined up with the indention in the right side engine cover.
 

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Use a paint pen to mark the belts and pulleys. For the cam pulleys, put a mark on the belt, cam pulley, and engine casing in a line. The marks don't have to coincide with the dots on the cam pulley. I just use them as it is an easy point to start with. For the crank pulley, put a mark on the belts and crank pulley. Put a mark on the horizontal belt and pulley independent of the vertical belt. I mark the vertical belt on the flange between the two belts. These marks will be transferred to the new belts and ease the alignment when installing new belts.


Remove the two bolts from the belt tensioner and remove the tensioner. These are 6mm.


Remove the belt. You will have to walk the belt off of the crank pulley. Repeat for the vertical cylinder.

Remove the 4 bolts in each valve cover. These are 5mm. Afterwards, pry the valve covers off. They have o-ring seals, so can require a little work to get off. There are cutouts on each side to help with prying off the valve cover.


You are now able to access the valves.
 

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Hi t-bills,

I am getting to know my recently bought 2008 1100s HM.
Just wanted to let you know that your thread motivates me to roll up the sleeves with a DIY attitude.

Thanks for taking your time to do this.
I can't wait to see it completed.
Glad to be of help. It really isn't bad at all. Having a guide to all of the things you have to remove on the gas tank makes it much easier. The first time I removed it required a bunch of trial and error. Just to give you an idea of the time it will take, I have about 1.5 hours in so far and that is with me taking my time and photographing the steps.
 

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Glad to be of help. It really isn't bad at all. Having a guide to all of the things you have to remove on the gas tank makes it much easier. The first time I removed it required a bunch of trial and error. Just to give you an idea of the time it will take, I have about 1.5 hours in so far and that is with me taking my time and photographing the steps.

This is great! I've done a few a few valve adjustments with Lt. Snyder's book, but this bike specific tutorial with pictures is a great help for first timers and people like me who would like a quick refresher before diving into a valve adjustment again. Thanks for doing this!
 

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I should finish up the valves today and get it all posted up. Honestly, CA Cycleworks video is about the best thing you can watch for the valve check and adjustment.
I will provide some specifics to the Hyper EVO as there are a couple of little things I would like to demonstrate. My belts should come in tomorrow. Hopefully I will get the belts done and posted up tomorrow and then wrap everything up on Tuesday or Wednesday.
 

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With the valve covers off, it is time to make 2 lists per valve cover:
1) Items removed
2) Items inserted
In my industry, foreign material can be a huge deal. We do FME (foreign material exclusion) lists. Anything that goes in goes on the list to ensure it comes out. In the case of the heads, make a list of all of the things you remove. This will help prevent Getting everything button up and you have spare parts or left something in the head.

For which ever cylinder you choose to start with, place the piston at TDC (top dead center) by moving the rear wheel. The easiest way is to put you finger over the hole. You will feel air blow out. When it stops blowing, you are at TDC. Alternatively, you can use a flashlight and look into the spark plug hole and watch for it. By placing the cylinder at TDC, you prevent dropping the valve into the cylinder once you are changing closer shims.


There is an oil galley in the bottom right of the exhaust side that should be plugged. I use a piece of paper towel twisted up. This prevents dropping half rings or other pieces into the oil galley.


Grab the cam pulley. There should be about 90 degrees of free play before the valves move. If there is little to no free play, this valve train is in the lull that is 180 degrees out from where you want to be. Grab the cam pulley and spin it so that you have the 90 degrees of free play. Below is a video demonstrating this.


Now you are ready to measure the valves. Start by measuring the opening shim gap. Use feeler gauges to slide between the opening shim and the opening rocker arm. Start with a feeler gauge around 0.002". Go up in sizes until the feeler gauge doesn't fit. The correct feeler gauge will have a little bit of drag, but you do not have to force it in. The correct feeler gauge will be your opening shim gap.


The gap you are aiming for is 0.004" for the opening shim gap.

How to replace an opening shim:
Remove the retaining spring on the opening rocker arm axle. Use a small screwdriver or pick to pry the spring out.


You will now be able to slide the opening rocker arm to the side a slight bit. Rotate the cam pulley within the free play while pushing the opening rocker arm towards the space the retaining spring used to occupy. The rocker arm will slide over when the cam pulley is at the edge of the free play just before that particular opening rocker arm moves.


One thing to note, the CA Cycleworks video shows being able to move both the exhaust and intake opening cams at the same time allowing the cam pulley to spin freely. This is not the case with the Hypermotard EVO motor. When you slide it to the side, it ends up riding on the closing cam preventing the cams to be turned all of the way over.

With the opening rocker arm moved to the side, you can remove the opening shim. My original opening shim on this valve was 2.80mm. My opening shim gap was 0.002". The shims come in 0.05mm increments. 0.05mm is roughly equal to 0.002". By using a 2.75mm shim, the opening gap will become 0.004".

I measure opening shims with the help of the "closer measurement tool". Don't let the name fool you. It is handy for measuring both. Zero out the calipers with the closer measurement tool.


Measure the opening shim that was on the valve. Sometimes the sizes aren't marked or aren't marked properly. This will allow you to determine the size you need to replace it with.
 

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Determine the size replacement shim you need. Measure it as well to ensure it is the size you think it is.


Place the new shim on the valve stem. Slide the opening rocker arm back over. Do not replace the retaining spring at this time. Spin the cam pulley back and forth to exercise the valve you are working on and ensure the opening shim has seated properly. Measure the opening shim gap to ensure you have selected the correct shim.

Now, move on to the closing shim. Use something to take out the lash of the closing rocker arm. I use a rocker arm depressor tool. Some people use screwdrivers. The risk with a screwdriver is that if you slip, you may strike the valve guide and damage it. Press on the closing rocker arm, but not on the closing shim. You just need to put a few pounds of force on it. Do not press it enough to cause the closing rocker arm to compress the return spring (and open the valve). With a few pounds of pressure on the closing rocker arm, measure the gap between the opening rocker arm and the opening shim. Start with 0.001" larger than your opening shim gap.


Subtract this gap from the opening shim gap to determine the closing shim gap. Ideally, you want this to be 0.002".

How to replace the closing shim:
Slide the opening rocker arm back over and remove the opening shim. I highly recommend buying a rocker holding tool for this step. It will keep you from losing a few years of your life. The closer rocker arm has a spring to return it to a closed valve position. Hook the rocker holding tool onto the closer rocker arm as shown below and press down. This will use a different rocker arm as leverage to depress the closing rocker arm.


Slide the closing shim down the valve stem exposing the half rings. Remove the half rings with either a magnet or your fingers. Using a magnet will prevent you from fishing down in the heads for the dropped half rings. With the half rings removed, the closing shim slides off the valve stem.


Zero out the calipers with the closer shim on the closer measurement tool.


My closing shim gap was 0.001". I selected a closing shim one size smaller than the original. Measure to ensure it is the size you desire.


Slide the new closing shim on the valve stem. Use the rocker holding tool to depress the closing rocker arm. Place the half rings back on the valve stem. This is the most difficult step of the whole procedure. I recommend putting some grease on your finger tip and sticking a half ring to it. Once you get one half ring in place, let go of the closer rocker arm. Take a minute to give your hands a rest as your thumb will be sore from depressing the closer rocker arm and your patience will have been tried by the half ring. Slightly depress the closer rocker arm again and spin the closing shim 180. This will spin the half ring with it allowing you to place the other half ring in the same location. Regrease your finger and put the other half ring on it. This one will end up being more of a challenge. Keep a small flat head screwdriver handy. Once you get the half ring hanging onto the stem, use the screwdriver to move it around into place.

Put the opening shim back on and slide the opening rocker arm back in place. Use the cam pulley to cycle the valve a few times to ensure everything is seated. Measure the opening gap and closing gap to ensure the proper shims have been installed. Once sure you have the proper gaps set, put the retaining spring back on the axle of the opening rocker arm. Move on to the next valve and do it all over again. :D

Once done with them all, put the valve covers back on. Each one has 4 5mm bolts.



For the Desmodue engines, it is typical for the exhaust valves to require shim swaps. It is common for the intake valves to still be in spec. Both of my intakes were within spec. I had to swap opening shims on both exhaust valves and a closing shim on one exhaust valve.
 

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Belts came in so time to finish this thing up.

Transfer the marks from the old belts to the new belts.


Install the belt tensioners.


Move the engine so that the dot on the crank pulley is aligned with the indention in the right case over. This places the horizontal cylinder at TDC.


Slide the vertical belt on. Line up the marks you previously placed on the belt and crank pulley.


The cam pulley will be 90 out of TDC. This means the cams will not be in lulls and the valves will be loaded up. Rotate the cam pulley so that the marks you made on the cam pulley and case are aligned. The cam pulley will try to rotate when you let go of it. Hold it in place while you slide the belt on. Make sure the marks are all aligned.


Put a little bit of tension on the belt and snug up the tensioner.


Put the horizontal belt on the crank pulley aligning your marks.


The horizontal cylinder is at TDC. The cams are at lulls and the valves are not loaded. Move the cam pulley so the marks are aligned and slide the belt on.
 

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On the horizontal cylinder, move the tensioner so that you have it pressed firmly against the belt. Tighten the tensioner bolts. Try running a 5mm allen between the idler pulley and the belt. You want to be able to run a 5mm allen between them (with force), but not be able to run a 6mm allen between them (even with significant force). If you put all of your might behind a 6mm and it goes between the belt and idler, it is fine.


Once you have gotten the tensioner adjusted as described above, tighten the bolts down pretty snug on the tensioner.

Rotate the engine so that the vertical cylinder is at TDC. Hold your thumb over the spark plug hole to feel air leaving to determine with it is at TDC. Repeat the tensioning process on the vertical cylinder belt.

Install the belt covers. There are 5 5mm bolts. Two are longer than the others. These go through both covers where they overlap. Be gentle with these bolts, especially if you have carbon fiber belt covers. It is easy to over-tighten and crack the belt covers.


Apply some anti-seize to the new spark plugs. Install the spark plugs. The spark plugs have built in crush washers.


Put the spark plug wires back on.
 

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Mexican Ducatista
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Questions

Great job t-bills!

How did it run?
Is the difference really noticable?

I am planning to do this myself ordering the belts from ca-cycleworks and the shims from EMS.

Would you recommend any special tool other than the Rocker Arm Depressor Tool and the Rocker Holder Tool??
How many miles or km does your HM have?
How different were in size the shims you took out from the shims you placed in?

Lots of questions...sorry
Thank you for sharing!
 

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Great job t-bills!

How did it run? Ran great. Hitting that starter for the first time after doing this is really satisfying. I took it out and ran through the revs a few times.
Is the difference really noticable? What difference in particular? How it runs? It runs pretty much the same, but my valves didn't have to be adjusted much.

I am planning to do this myself ordering the belts from ca-cycleworks and the shims from EMS. Yep. That's what I did. Go ahead and grab an oil filter and spark plugs from ca cycleworks while at it.

Would you recommend any special tool other than the Rocker Arm Depressor Tool and the Rocker Holder Tool?? Those are the only 2 I got. The depressor is one you could easily skip if you buy the holder tool and are only doing 2V bikes. You will want the depressor for 4V IMO. Some people get engine turning tools. I just use the back wheel with the bike in 6th. Easy enough and at the right price. If you are just going to order shims and not a whole shim kit, order the closer measurement tool. Also, buy the LT Snyder book. It is well worth the money.
How many miles or km does your HM have? ~6000 miles. I did it a little bit early, but this bike doesn't get ridden many miles compared to the Multi.
How different were in size the shims you took out from the shims you placed in? I had to use 1 size smaller (0.05mm) for the two openers and the 1 closer.

Lots of questions...sorry Ask away. I'll be happy to answer anything I can.
Thank you for sharing!
.
 

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So, I'm not going to do a full detail on how to button it back up. Most of it really is just reversing what I posted above. There are a few things I will point out.

First off, make sure that you don't jump the gun on starting the bike. Youe engine still doesn't have oil in it. If you want to do that before assembling stuff, that is fine. Just make sure you don't get the gas tank on, make the connections and think "I'm going to start it up" only to come to the harsh realization you haven't put oil in it.

Putting the air box back on is a PITA. If you come up with a good way of doing this, please let me know. You need to get everything aligned at once. The hose in the middle that attaches to the metal nipple is one of the most difficult parts. I recommend putting a little bit of spit or lube on it to help this slide on.


So, these bolts that hold the air box to the frame... turns out you don't have to remove them to get the air box out. They have rubber grommets that slide into the frame. Go ahead and thread these bolts back in place prior to putting the air box in place. Work the rubber grommets into the frame. I recommend a little spit or lube on these as well. I ended up using a flathead screwdriver to help get the rubber pushed through.


Once you get the air box to set down in the throttle bodies, go ahead and tighten these down.


Next you will put the gas tank back in place. You will want to pay attention to all of the cables to make sure you get the cables on the correct side of the bike. You will have to thread the tank between them. Take note of the pictures below to see which go on which side.



Prior to snapping the back of the tank into place, be sure to install the small clamps on the fuel lines. These thread into the bottom of the tank. It is much easier to do this prior to getting the tank settled all the way into place.


Go ahead and connect up the fuel lines prior to fully seating the gas tank. I find the fuel lines don't like to settle into place. By hooking the lines up at this point, you will ensure you have gotten the lines where they belong prior to fastening the tank. Note that the fuel quick disconnects require some decent force to get them to snap in place. Be mindful that they break easily, especially when cold. Pull on them to ensure they have properly seated. Last thing you want is them to fly off when you charge the fuel pump.


Put the cover back on the fuel pump. Make all of your electrical connections.


Mount the oil cooler. Mount the plastics. Put the seat on. Fill the oil.

When you put the key in and turn to the on position, the fuel pump will sound sick. This is because it is charging the system. It is fine.

You must take your bike for a test ride afterwards. Its the rules.
 

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Thankyou so much for the time and effort you spent to make this. I did mine yesterday ( 2011 EVO Sp), and ( luckily) only one exhaust side opener was out of spec ( mind you I did use the Ducati not Synder specs.....). Luckily the airbox wasnt as bad to deal with as expected: I just pulled the rear fasteners out with the grommet ( the screws were spinning anyway). I was also lazy and didnt remove the belts. If more shims were out of spec, it would be necessary. I even put the inboard 3mm button head fuel line clamp back in! ( very tempted by a cable tie though!).Even did throttle body vacuum test- both equal,phew because the adjuster looks like tank/airbox off to do it ( and therefore a fuel supply would have to be rigged up...)
Bike seemed better quality than the 2008 1100S HM I had in terms of fastener quality.Looks like I got a Monday morning not Friday arvo bike.
Thanks again, brilliant.
Jonathan
 
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