Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

41 - 56 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Changing the oil really helped on my bike. The Mobil 1 10W40 I was running was very grabby and almost impossible to ride when cold. The Motul 7100 10W40 is better. However both are horrid compared to every other bike out there. The only other clutch that comes close to the level of grabby is my CRF450 clutch. Because race bike?
Yeah - mine seems grabbier with the mobil 1 as well. Though before that I used a non motorcycle specific mobil 1 20-50 and things were better. hmmmm.

I wonder if it has to do with the weight, rather than the oil. Would a 20w-xx be smoother than a 10w - xx?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
876 Posts
"Ducati quite often will change part numbers with no apparent measurable or visual change. And often the price will be very different too!"

That's because they out source. Suppliers come and go and costs vary. They used to have all the valve shims outsourced but I believe do them in house now. By using a variation on the part number, they know the cost associated with the part and the failure rate without having to serialize the parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Changing the oil really helped on my bike. The Mobil 1 10W40 I was running was very grabby and almost impossible to ride when cold. The Motul 7100 10W40 is better. However both are horrid compared to every other bike out there. The only other clutch that comes close to the level of grabby is my CRF450 clutch. Because race bike?
I haven't but you might consider trying this:

AMSOIL 10W-50 Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil

Delivers Confidence in Clutch Feel
AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil’s superior friction-durability properties help minimize clutch slippage, fade and chatter, giving riders consistent clutch feel during takeoffs or when maneuvering around obstacles on the trail. In an extreme simulated-start test, AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil continued to deliver consistent clutch feel following 32 simulated race starts, while a leading original equipment manufacturer (OEM)-branded oil demonstrated inconsistent clutch-lever action and poor clutch feel after 16 starts. The clutch plates lubricated with AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil remained clean and in good overall condition, while the plates using the OEM oil revealed discoloration and wear. AMSOIL Synthetic Dirt Bike Oil’s superior performance helps instill in riders the confidence that their bikes will perform consistently in all types of riding conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
What's funny, I've fallen in LOVE with my '13 Hyperstrada's clutch.. I've owned it since new (now at 15,000 km), I rarely beat on the bike (except to shock the occasional sporty on a 0-160 km/hr pull) and it's been on Motul 300V 10W40 since 500 km.. Besides keeping an eye on clutch lever free play (which can change between hot vs cold) has been the best feeling clutch I've felt on a bike.

It slips beautifully, it's very easy to manage in slow stop and go traffic, the slipper function works flawlessly, clutch lever pull is light enough while still providing positive feedback.. It's everything I wish my old school steel framed WR450 motard had..

Maybe I'm crazy, maybe I'm sane.. All I know, is I modify my track motard to achieve what the Hyperstrada came from the factory with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
946 Posts
The page shows the 3 (#5, 12, 9) parts with part # differences. But the only actual change is the clutch pack. The screws are needed to hold the pack compressed against the slipper (#11)springs so you can install #7 nut.
Ducati quite often will change part numbers with no apparent measurable or visual change. And often the price will be very different too!
Did you use a clutch basket holding tool when removing or tightening the nut?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
946 Posts
I'm still am amazed at how much better it is.

Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk
One thing that is interesting... when comparing the 2014 to the 2015 clutch packs. The 2015 is very straightforward - it has the same size plates until the last one. However the 2014 uses different thickness plates, and then a "convex driven plate". Which I'm not sure what it is.

As far as I can tell it doesn't really matter as long as the stackup is the correct thickness and things are in a logical order.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
876 Posts
The convex plate is essentially a large belleville washer, which is a type of spring. It cushions the entry and exit of friction pressure. IMO and only MO, an undesirable feature to make the bike more user friendly. It will prolong shifts slightly since you have to move the lever more, and delay full engagement
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
You're a *god* for posting this guide. Thanks!

The clutch is the one gigantic glaring flaw with a bike that I otherwise completely love. I'll probably wait until my next oil change; but I will be doing this.

That's some good forum, man.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Another early 821 clutch fixed - "just do it"

I originally posted this on the 'strada site last month but since my last two rides continue to impress me on the results, I thought I'd share my thoughts here for you all 2013-2015 821's.

Bought my Hyper 821 just last week, and having the first gen already in the stable and modded out, I couldn't live with the grabby clutch so added the 4 pieces from the eBay anti shudder kit this weekend. I ran into a big problem not discussed in detail on this thread where the spacer between the clutch basket and clutch pack was binding and causing my clutch pack to stick out an extra 1/8-1/4". After I sealed the clutch cover and installed everything back, I noticed that my clutch lever wouldn't disengage the clutch. I had to remove my cover again and it took me a while to figure out why my 32m nut was not sitting at least flush with its bolt. I finally shoved the clutch pack in right after messing around with it and that spacer was the issue. Then when I started the bike after testing that the clutch was engaging - it was super hard to shift, like the clutch plates were jammed or something, and I couldn't move the lever to neutral unless the motor was turned off. Turns out the cable as discussed in this thread needed to be adjusted and that solved the hard shifting and neutral problems. 821 runs like a champ now (fingers crossed) and shifts easier than my old Honda sportbikes. WTF was Ducati thinking and I can't believe the previous owner rode it like this for 11k miles. It nearly threw me off and I almost dumped it on my test ride last week. (I've been riding for 20 years and this is my 4th Duck) Now my first gen has some pretty stiff competition but the hydraulic clutch is still gold in my book. I want to thank the OP and all contributors to solving this issue, now lets see what a new exhaust will do.

*Also, want to add that using clamps to compress the clutch pack worked a lot better for than trying to wrench a 3mm nut.
 
41 - 56 of 56 Posts
Top