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Discussion Starter #1
Tools needed:


First, remove canister from mounting bracket.


Identify each hose and where they lead. (note the "tee" in the TB hoses)


Locate the throttle body hoses and their corresponding crimped hose clamps.



Insert small phillips head screwdriver into the crimp and break the crimp. (should pop right open)


Use pliers to pull hoses off the throttle body nipples.

 

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Discussion Starter #2
Cut this hose as close to the canister as possible or break the crimp.


Pull out the throttle body hoses from the left side of the bike and remove the canister assembly.

Reroute the remaining tank hose (the one that you cut) to the ground.


Remove nipples from both throttle bodies with deep 10mm socket.


Remove canister mounting bracket from cylinder head. Keep M6 bolts.


Use existing M6 canister mounting bracket bolts to screw into and plug the nipple holes in both throttle bodies.



Done.

Perhaps, relocate factory horn. (?) (I plan to purchase a Stebel Nautilus air horn to fill the void.)


Good Luck!
 

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"jmoth79" two thumbs way up:) i love it when people do step by step instructions with photos. It takes you twice as long but it helps out the other people that need it.
 

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Awesome writeup. If you're gonna put a Stebel in there, make sure you keep that canister bracket - it can be repurposed quite nicely to mount the horn in that area. I posted some pics of my finished install in another thread.

-Mike
 

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Nice pics.:D I just did this two weeks ago and forgot to take pictures.

Only thing I did different is I pulled the hoses off the throttle body nipples with my hands instead of pliers.

But man, that vertical cylinder is a bitch to get to. :mad:
 

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Awesome write up, just completed this and it didnt take to long, would have been shorter but I dropped a nipple in the V and it took a little bit to get out, thankfully I have a ton of tools.
 

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Yes, again great right up. This explains it between my wife and I, she just doesn't understand what makes us guys tick.

 

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There's no need to cut any of the hoses, they can all be pulled out of engine bay without issue. And you should be applying a gasket sealer to the threads of the bolts when re-inserting back into the motor.
 

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I think California is the only state that requires the canister but ducati makes all bikes 50 state compliant I guess for ease of manufacturing/inventory

You guys must have some serious emission laws in the US, in the land down under we don't have the evap canisters on our SF's.
 

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I had the dealer remove this before I would take delivery. Being from Colorado they said it wouldn't effect the warranty at all, and if Ducati were to ask why it was removed they would simply say I was having issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
From Haynes:

The Evaporative Emissions Control (EVAP) system absorbs fuel vapors and, during engine operation, releases them into the engine intake where they mix with the incoming air-fuel mixture. The EVAP system consists of a charcoal-filled canister and the lines connecting the canister to the fuel tank, ported vacuum and intake manifold vacuum.

When the engine is not operating fuel vapors are transferred from the fuel tank, throttle body and intake manifold to the charcoal canister where they are stored. When the engine is running, the fuel vapors are purged from the canister by the purge control valve. The gasses are consumed in the normal combustion process.
 

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ok, seems like nothing to do with tank expansion...

btw, my bike was built in September 2009 and is still on the original tank. I suspect the tank has expanded due to my forks slightly touch it at full lock but that's it (bo other sign of expansion)...

knock on wood.
 

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I had my canister removed by my dealer at first service. It appears that they did the procedure just as described in this thread. Before canister removal, I would have a significant vacuum when opening my gas filler. After canister removal, I have no vacuum at all when opening my gas filler. Is the loss of vacuum at the gas filler expected when removing the canister? Should I be concerned that the tank is no longer under vacuum?
 

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The whole point of removing the canister is not to prevent tank vacuum. The tank in stock form was never under a vacuum. A gas tank can't operate under vacuum or excessive positive pressure. The reason for removing the canister is to prevent positive pressure from building inside the tank from the fuel trying to vent. Your tank is now vented through the vent tube directly to the air. So now there is no pressure build up or noise when you open the gas cap. This is what you want.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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The whole point of removing the canister is not to prevent tank vacuum. The tank in stock form was never under a vacuum. A gas tank can't operate under vacuum or excessive positive pressure. The reason for removing the canister is to prevent positive pressure from building inside the tank from the fuel trying to vent. Your tank is now vented through the vent tube directly to the air. So now there is no pressure build up or noise when you open the gas cap. This is what you want.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
Well, not exactly. There's a relief valve in the stock fuel cap that opens at a set pressure. There's also a vent valve that admits air as the fuel is used. If you want to take the cap apart, you can disable the relief valve. I installed a DP fuel cap assembly which has no valves rather than messing with the original one.
 
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