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Long time lurker, first time poster. I've done several searches and am surprised this has not come up (either that or my word search skills are poor!). What's the correct process for changing the chip in a 2000 748? Do you disconnect the battery? Do you need to unplug the computer? Etc. Thanks!
 

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Old Wizard
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The engine control unit (ECU) under the seat has a access hole covered by a removable rubber bung. Note that the Eprom chip has a notch on one end so note its location on the installed chip before removal so that you don’t install the new one backwards. Using a chip-puller (Radio Shack) will make removal easier. Wait at least a minute after shutting off the bike before you pull the chip.

Take care to not bend any of the 28 pins when inserting them. Slightly inserting 14 on one side first, and springing them to insert the other side into their sockets is the way I did it. The clue that you have it right is the fuel pump firing up when you turn on the ignition key.

If you have a idling problem, the best approach is to have your dealer re-adjust the exhaust emissions CO level to compensate for any minor increased airflow. There's a CO trimmer screw adjustment on ECUs that provides for limited changes in fuel mixture at idle (with lesser effects across the RPM range).

The trimmer is a potentiometer located next to the EPROM chip socket inside the ECU. It has a range of about 3/4 turn, so be careful, if you try to turn it more, it'll break off. When you rotate the trimmer screw clockwise, the injector's duration is shortened so the mixture is leaned. Counterclockwise gives a richer fuel mixture. The default position is it's rotation mid-point. The trimmer adds/subtracts a millisecond or so to each fuel pulse over the entire RPM range. So go easy, an eighth-turn on the screw is often all that's usually needed to cure low-speed rideability problems.

Always a good measure of fuel mixture is to check the color of the inside of the tailpipe. After a few hundred miles it should be medium-to-dark gray, not black or sooty.
 

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