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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm going to buy some paint to repaint the plastics on my 748S. How much base do I need to buy? Color rite sells it in 1/2 pints, pints and quarts.

Thanks,
Dave

edit: Here are some pix of the bike.





 

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Discussion Starter #2
I think a quart will be plenty (it better be at $190 per).

Was just over at my cousin-in-laws welding shop during lunch - he has a paint booth for friends and family and his own personal use. What a great guy!



With his help I plan to make my Duc a red head (my wife is a red head too - coincidence?). So, 80 grit to rough up the black and give the plastic repair stuff something to hold on to. Repair the cracks, looks like about three small ones. Then primer at my house, sand with 180 grit then over to his shop for the color and clear coats. I am going to paint it with him looking over my shoulder. Should be a good learning experience.



Sounds easy - probably take me a month!
 

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You may want to ease up on the rough grit sandpaper, try 220-320 for sanding repairs and 400-600 for sanding primer before basecoat. The 80 grit for gaining grip for repair materials may work okay, but be careful not to gouge too much. For being an inexperienced painter, you should get the quart to make sure you have good coverage and enough left over for touch up should you need it.

Red is a very expensive color, that's just the name of the game.
 

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Good info on the grit. I will start with something finer as you suggest and only go to the grittier if needed to remove scratches and to prep the areas to be repaired.

Looking forward to this project. I usually work on cars but working on motorcycles is so much more pleasant.

You may want to ease up on the rough grit sandpaper, try 220-320 for sanding repairs and 400-600 for sanding primer before basecoat. The 80 grit for gaining grip for repair materials may work okay, but be careful not to gouge too much. For being an inexperienced painter, you should get the quart to make sure you have good coverage and enough left over for touch up should you need it.

Red is a very expensive color, that's just the name of the game.
 

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Ok, I think I have this grit situation straight.

400 grit wet to prep for primer. Only use 180 grit as needed for scratches. Only use 80 grit for areas to be repaired (cracks).

After primer use 400 grit wet again.

Then base/clear. Not sure what happens after the clear goes on. Wet sand again or just buff?
 

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Ok, I think I have this grit situation straight.

400 grit wet to prep for primer. Only use 180 grit as needed for scratches. Use 220 to shape repair material, and follow with 400 to prepare for prime coat Only use 80 grit for areas to be repaired Yup(cracks).

After primer use 400 grit wet again. 400 to smooth major high/rough surfaces followed by 600 to smooth surface for basecoat application

Then base/clear. Not sure what happens after the clear goes on. Wet sand again or just buff?You can wet sand any imperfections with 1500/2000/2500/3000 and then buff, or you can wetsand with 800 and reshoot the clear if it is not as perfect as you planned. Lots of options but the basics are covered.
 

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Ok, I think I have this grit situation straight.

400 grit wet to prep for primer. Only use 180 grit as needed for scratches. Use 220 to shape repair material, and follow with 400 to prepare for prime coat Only use 80 grit for areas to be repaired Yup(cracks).

After primer use 400 grit wet again. 400 to smooth major high/rough surfaces followed by 600 to smooth surface for basecoat application

Then base/clear. Not sure what happens after the clear goes on. Wet sand again or just buff?You can wet sand any imperfections with 1500/2000/2500/3000 and then buff, or you can wetsand with 800 and reshoot the clear if it is not as perfect as you planned. Lots of options but the basics are covered.
I'll second this but say to re-clear go up a bit, maybe 1200, because it can sink if memory serves. I worked for John Connery for a few years, very respected guy in Canada, along with his brother (who actually had the fastest drag bike in Canada back then, legitimately!), but it was a looooong time ago. He's still around doing some killer bikes and cars, has a website.

Try to use catalysed putty if you have to, as well, because that red lacquer crap that air dries is nasty, sinks, does wierd crap, not to mention never dries...blah. Use a putty you can chemically harden. And as noted, 80 is for knocking down and SHAPING a rough surface quickly that's been repaired, and in those spots you almost if not always need to putty a bit...eurythane filling primer is good there:)

Make sure the air is super clean if it's a 'home' boothe (good filters!), especially with the clearcoat(s) AND no oil/crap shooting out of your compressor. Nice ambient temps not too hot or cold. Use a good cleaner, I believe Cleansol was the product we used, but don't quote me...right before you spray. Then brand new tackrag for every clear application (trust me, it's worth it!) and don't touch the cleaned surface with your fingers. And don't move it after you've painted it for as many hours as possible so it doesn't do wierd crap by being moved through the air. I've seen many perfectly applied finished utterly ruined because they were move an hour later when they 'felt' dry...

After primed, if you REALLY want a nice finish...mist on very dry paint, any colour, and keep sanding with 600-1200 until that mist is gone, squeegy the piece and look sideways a bit...if it's like glass at an angle, and no mist ,you can stop sanding and apply basecoat.

If you go to the effort, you'll be rewarded:) And yes, I'm neurotic about this stuff LOL...

Shawn
 

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And yes, I'm neurotic about this stuff LOL...

Shawn
Wow, there is another "me" on this planet! When people think of me as a painter, the first word reported as coming to mind is "anal". But everyone likes to use the word "meticulous" in it's place. True story.

And I definitely agree with using 1200 for smoother finishes in re-clearing.
 

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Wow, there is another "me" on this planet! When people think of me as a painter, the first word reported as coming to mind is "anal". But everyone likes to use the word "meticulous" in it's place. True story.

And I definitely agree with using 1200 for smoother finishes in re-clearing.
Cool. I'm jealous...wish I still had access to a booth and my old Sata. I'd LOVE to do a Dukes of Hazzard paintjob on my 1098...but as suggested by, I think Matt here, more like Ducks of Hazzard...Daffy and Donald...and of course Daisy!

Just a little airbrushing on the carbon-unpainted monoposto top, of the three ducks in the General Lee tearing off, cartoon style, but the rest of the bike a killer red (like a cadmium red light if you know oil paints) and a big 01 on the side fairings.

Basically how my bike looks now with the red/black, scheme wise, but much more 'wow'...

OK I totally took this post off target...very sorry to the original poster:(

Shawn
 

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Reminds me of where I started.

From this:


To this:
 

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Looks awesome man, nice and clean...and good for the original poster to see...:)
 
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