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Ducati Designs
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I had one on my Gran Canyon with Hot Grips ERGO1 grips. Worked fine. I put an oring on the shaft under the knob to keep out moisture.

Ciao!

pg
 

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Mr_Squidward said:
Any comments on it’s durability or if it’s worth the install?
I can't comment on the durability of that particular unit but I did have a variable controller on my HotGrips and eventually I went back to a three position switch which works just fine. I am never wanting for an in-between temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mike said:
eventually I went back to a three position switch which works just fine.
Mike, why did you go back to the switch?

BTW, I’m using the installation write-up on your site as my guide and just wanted to take this opportunity to say thanks for that very helpful info.
 

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I looked at the options when I installed mine a few months ago. What I read is that a low, high and off switch is all that is needed (by most opinions) as a heat trolly or other adjustments are almost too incremental and not necessary. I went with a marine grade high, off, low switch and am very happy with the results. My 2 cents!
 

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Mr_Squidward said:
Mike, why did you go back to the switch?
I modified a HeatTroller unit so it would fit in my instrument cluster. About a year later it started acting flakey and eventually failed. I'm not sure if it was due to my mods or not. The HeatTroller guy was very helpful and offered to inspect it and replace it free if it was defective or I would pay $10 for a replacement control board if it was my fault but I really didn't want to be without grip heat while I shipped it back because I use grip heat nearly year round.

Originally I opted for the variable solid-state controller thinking it would consume less electricity than a resistor/3-way switch setup when on low. But because our bikes voltage regulator dumps any unused current to the frame anyway, I don't think this was a valid reason.

So I spent $12 on a high quality marine grade switch and used the resistor that was originally supplied with the HotGrips kit

The 3-position switch has the advantage of simplicity and it is a little less fussy to change settings or turn it off. The HeatTroller requires a big rotation of the wrist to go from High to Off while the switch is just a flick. With gloves on I could never tell how far I had rotated the knob but the 3-way toggle switch is very tactile and easy to operate. Since I have installed the 3-way switch I've found I run with the grips off about 1/3 of the time, on low 1/3 and on high the remaining 1/3. I never wish I had a setting in between (I wouldn't use it even it were there).

Either control method works well but I think the 3-way switch has the edge in terms of functionality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The efficiency of the solid state unit is what attracted me to it in the first place. The thought of wasting all that power to heat through the big resister just rubs my cheap posterior the wrong way. If, however, it’s true that my sexy new Italian is flushing all her spare volts down the tubes anyway, I guess I’ll just go with a switch and see how it works out for me.

Thanks to all who responded, glad I found this place,

Scott
 

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I disagree with the theory that the RR is dumping excess, unused wattage into the frame/whatever. If this were true, then the RR would be hottest at light loads (like running on low beam) and cooler when running a whole bunch of electrics. I just haven't been convinced that our RR's are running like the ancient zener regulator on the front of an old British bike. I have not felt my RR be any warmer with light loading or under heavy loading. Some day I'll rig up a thermocouple to verify for sure...
 

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That said, I have hotgrips w/ the 3 position switch and resistor pack. Haven't had any issues in over 3 years of use.
 

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Stick said:
I disagree with the theory that the RR is dumping excess, unused wattage into the frame/whatever. If this were true, then the RR would be hottest at light loads (like running on low beam) and cooler when running a whole bunch of electrics.
I'm not an electrical engineer but I've heard more than one make this claim. I have a little scepticism myself but until I see that claim refuted in a convincing manner, I think it's probably true. You are correct the heat would have to go somewhere, maybe it's dissipated in the alternator itself which is bathed in oil?

Anyone?
 

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Well, its true, and you are right, Mike. Excess voltage from the generator is shunted through a resistance (or dead-short sometimes) in the RR and is dissipated as heat, both inside the coils of the stator and through the RR housing. Hence the big heat sinks and the propensity to burn up. Generally, it's only a few hundred watts, the bike consumes the rest. Good thermal conductivity between the RR and the surrounding frame as well as good airflow can help keep them alive longer.

Light loads and high RPMs generate the most heat, but that condition also generally equates to a lot of cooling capacity in the motor and airflow across the RR. Probably not a good idea to sit and rev the bike without moving or a big fan (like on a dyno). Also a (minor) strike against synthetic oils with oil-cooled generators, since these have a lower specific heat than dinosaur oils. Bikes with really big charging systems (BMW, Kawasaki ZZR-1200, etc) use air-cooled alternators because they are more efficient at dumping the heat.

Ciao!

pg
 

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I just used a 3 position switch with my Dual Star heated grips. I had a heat troller on one of my snowmobiles and after one season I had nothing but problems with it. I also spent the extra money and got a weather proof switch from WestMarine. This way I don't have to worry about it getting wet at all. Also, when I installed my grips I tried to make EVERYTHING weather proof but that is just because I am a bit anal.
 

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Once clarification; Mr. Squidward was originally asking about the Hot Grips variable controller, NOT the Heat Troller made by another manufacturer. The Hot Grips variable controller is a small, rheostat-like device thats all contained within a die-cast housing, very neat and clean, just three wires. The Heat Troller is a much more complex electronic module, soetimes with a remote circuit board, LED, etc.

I have used both. I had a Heat Troller on my ST2; it failed in a short time and never quite worked right; The duty cycle seemed to change with engine load.

I used the Hot Grips controller on my Gran Canyon, and it worked very well and was worth the money.

pg
 

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pgeller said:
The Hot Grips variable controller is a small, rheostat-like device thats all contained within a die-cast housing, very neat and clean, just three wires. The Heat Troller is a much more complex electronic module, soetimes with a remote circuit board, LED, etc.
Paul, does that mean the Hot Grips variable controller gets hot just like the resistor that comes with HotGrips? I haven't found this to be an issue (with the resistor) but was wondering if the variable resistor is capable of providing more Ohms (lower grip temperature). If so, wouldn't it get even hotter than the fixed resistor when it was turned all the way down?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I’m not an EE, but from the description on the Hot Grips site it looks like a FET based device. If so it would switch the power on and off very rapidly, as opposed to creating a resistance like a rheostat. The longer the on duration the warmer the grips should become. Although there is a bit of overhead involved in the switching, this should be a more efficient method, thereby creating less heat. (In the controller that is, not the grips)

Then again I could be completely wrong :)
 

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Oh, sorry, that's not what I meant by "rheostat-like", Mike. I just meant that the form factor is like that of a rheostat or big pot. Internally, its a solid-state, switching regulator and is not resistive. It doesn't get hot. I found that it was able to vary the grip temperature from just a trickle to fully smokin'. It is infinitely variable, no steps or detents.

Gotta watch every word!

pg
 
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