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Discussion Starter #1
It's time for my second tire change.

The first one was done at Ducati Seattle about 5000 miles ago. I want to do this one myself, but i cannot get the wheel off.

So far I have:

- Purchased a rear wheel stand (T-Rex), and have the bike up on the stand.

- Removed the muffler (Full Termi)

- Removed the axel nut clip



But I cannot get the axel nut to budge!!
I am using an 18" breaker bar, with a 2' extension on it.
The bike is in gear, and I am also using the wheel stop accessory on the rear stand. The wheel just turned until one of the wheel spokes was stopped by the wheel stop on the rear stand. Continual pressure caused the bike stand to flip out from under the bike and I almost dropped it.

I can stand on the breaker bar with the extension, and cannot get the axel nut to budge!

recommendations?
(besides avoiding dealerships in the future)
 

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It's time for my second tire change.

The first one was done at Ducati Seattle about 5000 miles ago. I want to do this one myself, but i cannot get the wheel off.

So far I have:

- Purchased a rear wheel stand (T-Rex), and have the bike up on the stand.

- Removed the muffler (Full Termi)

- Removed the axel nut clip



But I cannot get the axel nut to budge!!
I am using an 18" breaker bar, with a 2' extension on it.
The bike is in gear, and I am also using the wheel stop accessory on the rear stand. The wheel just turned until one of the wheel spokes was stopped by the wheel stop on the rear stand. Continual pressure caused the bike stand to flip out from under the bike and I almost dropped it.

I can stand on the breaker bar with the extension, and cannot get the axel nut to budge!

recommendations?
(besides avoiding dealerships in the future)
I stand on the rear brake lever - that is enough to hold the wheel from turning.

I also have a piece of 1" wooden dowel that fits between the brake pedal and the frame slider - either way works.

Then I use a 12" breaker bar aided by a 4 foot piece of 1/2" steel pipe.

Another way is to use a rattle gun.

With both methods I leave the trans in neutral to prevent transmission damage - especially with the rattle gun method.

The torque value is 180 foot pounds so it does take a bit of force to turn. I expect the guys at Ducati Seattle (excellent dudes) actually did the job properly which is why it is tight.

I have several Ducatis and I note that if you keep the nut, washer and cone clean and greased (as per the manual) it is easier to remove and reinstall.
 

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I've had the same issue Bill, I had my son in law help with a 1/2" breaker bar and 4' pipe ext., but it took a 2x4 through the wheel against the swing arm to stop the wheel from turning. Trying it with the rear brake didn't work. I also tried a 1/2" air gun that is rated for about 400 foot pounds of torque and that wouldn't bust it loose either. Like oleary said it's important to keep the washer and cone greased.
 

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Try putting some penetrating oil on the castle nut. I had troubles getting mine broken loose also. I hit the nut with some WD40 and came back 5 minutes later. If that doesn't help, obtain one of your larger friends...
 

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+1 on the WD40 and the advice re keeping the castle nut/axle threads clean and greased.

It'll help to have the bike on the ground initially with a mate sat on it holding the brakes whilst you loosen the axle nut a little....then up on the stand to finish.
Same again for final tightening....230NM (170lbf-ft)

Rattle guns.....can be dodgy with alloy wheel nut tools ;-)
 

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I bent the wheel stop accessory from the Ducati rear stand!

When applying the initial pressure downward on the at least 3 foot to 4 foot plus lever , use lots of force , Hands flat sos if it does break loose you don't bust knuckles or your nose ifin it does break free...

At work we jump on the long levers with our feet to free up nuts, of course we don't care if THEIR equiptment suffers damage.

I use never seize and grease for lube , You can never use too much never seize on a nut!!!
I'm a fan of never seize been using it fo 40 years and it has never done domage to anything YET?...
 

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Yeh...it can be a bitch. 230Nm is a lot.

I finally gave up and use an air impact gun (rattle wrench) and it's a breeze now.
 

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Mine also wouldn't come loose without the air impact wrench. Used my alloy rear wheel nut tool with no problems (but if I did it over again I'd go for one in steel just to be safe).

Part of the problem is that the safety clip didn't line up at 180 ft-lbs, the nut needed to be tuned about 1/8th turn further before it would line up.

At least I'm not worrying about it backing out on its own!
 

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Mine also wouldn't come loose without the air impact wrench. Used my alloy rear wheel nut tool with no problems (but if I did it over again I'd go for one in steel just to be safe).

Part of the problem is that the safety clip didn't line up at 180 ft-lbs, the nut needed to be tuned about 1/8th turn further before it would line up.

At least I'm not worrying about it backing out on its own!
You'd better check ,me on this but the nut is torqued to 230 Nm and I think that equates to 170 FP, not 180. You may be overtightening it.
 

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Tighten to very near the recommended torque then line up the saftey wire hole. I wouldn't worry about a few '#s either way just check it after the first few miles to see if anything has moved , and check every now and then after...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for the thoughtful and thorough replies!

I gave it a liberal dousing of WD-40 this morning. On my way home from work tonight I am going to buy a 3' long length of pipe and maybe rent an electric impact driver.

I'll take the bike off the stand to get the rear tire on the ground this time. My son said he would straddle the bike and stand on the brake, as I loosen the nut.

Thanks again. I am confident I'll complete the job tonight, and I am not as worried about damaging anything now.
 

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You'd better check ,me on this but the nut is torqued to 230 Nm and I think that equates to 170 FP, not 180. You may be overtightening it.
170 ft-lb plus or minus 10 percent, so you are still in spec at 187 ft-lb. In my experience, anything less than 170 allowed the nut to rotate enough to put pressure on the safety clip. So I shoot for 170 ft-lb and then add whatever is required to get the holes to line up for the safety clip.
 

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It's time for my second tire change.

The first one was done at Ducati Seattle about 5000 miles ago. I want to do this one myself, but i cannot get the wheel off.

So far I have:

- Purchased a rear wheel stand (T-Rex), and have the bike up on the stand.

- Removed the muffler (Full Termi)

- Removed the axel nut clip



But I cannot get the axel nut to budge!!
I am using an 18" breaker bar, with a 2' extension on it.
The bike is in gear, and I am also using the wheel stop accessory on the rear stand. The wheel just turned until one of the wheel spokes was stopped by the wheel stop on the rear stand. Continual pressure caused the bike stand to flip out from under the bike and I almost dropped it.

I can stand on the breaker bar with the extension, and cannot get the axel nut to budge!

recommendations?
(besides avoiding dealerships in the future)
Yep, air impact gun and you don't need any of that other crap. Well you do need a 55mm socket
 

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170 ft-lb plus or minus 10 percent, so you are still in spec at 187 ft-lb. In my experience, anything less than 170 allowed the nut to rotate enough to put pressure on the safety clip. So I shoot for 170 ft-lb and then add whatever is required to get the holes to line up for the safety clip.
Exactly- at 170 it wouldn't line up. When it did it was at 180 or so...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
*** U P D A T E ***


I drenched the entire area in WD-40 before i went to bed Wed night, and let it sit all day. My 20something yr old son Graham and I decided to give it one more try before trying to find a place that would rent an impact gun.

Besides, I had an idea:
What if we turn the wrench 180 degrees so you have to lift up on the handle, and use my truck's hydraulic jack to do the lifting?
So we took the bike off the stand and set it on the floor to loosen the nut. I straddled the bike and Graham pumped the jack.
We lifted the bike (with me on it) OFF THE GROUND by the breaker bar!
I bounced on the seat a few times...nothing!

Then we used my regular ratchet, and pounded the handle into a long piece of tubing we had in the garage, making a 3' handle. While I straddled the bike, graham stood on the wrench handle extension. The wrench BROKE! -- sheering off the socket head. Thankfully, we were using a 1 1/2 inch socket extension, and the head got stuck in that, and not in my $75 axel socket.

I have a small Makita electric impact wrench that I got for free once with the purchase of a miter saw. I never use it, so the battery was dead initially Wed night. We charged the battery over night and decided to give that a go next...nothing.

But we were hopeful that all of this had made SOME progress to the situation, so back to the breaker bar with an extension...
I straddled the bike again, and my 190 pound son JUMPED up and down on the extension handle. On the sixth or seventh jump, the nut squeaked and moved a tiny bit. We took appropriate time to celebrate, then muscled it off the rest of the way.

We took the wheel and new tire to Cycle Gear to have the tire mounted. Upon arrival, there were no other customers in the store, and they said they had no jobs waiting in back, so it would take about 10 minutes to complete mine.

But the kid helping me could not get the lower bead of the new tire over the rim...he thought it was the wrong size tire. So he needed the manager's help.

The manager was off-and-on the phone, and was running the register because several other customers had entered the store.

Eventually, the manager went back and got the tire onto the wheel, but left it to the initial guy to finish the job.

The problem was that now the initial guy he was off-and-on the phone and had a long line at the register.

Finally he broke free and got the job done, with the obligatory damage to the rim those tire machines leave. It took more than an hour and a half. All the while my sweet wife was waiting in the car.

When I got to the register, the manager informed me that since the shop time took so long, he was going to have to increase my shop charge to $50. The first thing that came out of my mouth was laughter. He laughed, too, and didn't charge me any labor charge!

Putting it all back together was a piece of cake...
 

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here's how I do it

I broke my 1/2 inch drive breaker bar, so I bought a "Titan" 3/4 drive breaker bar, 40" long, and a 3/4 to 1/2 adapter. I leave the bike on the side stand, face the right side of the bike, hold the front brake with right hand, step on rear brake with right foot, and push the bar counterclockwise from the 1 o'clock position with left hand. I am 5'6 and bench press 80 pounds but I can (just barely) do it with this big breaker bar. Also I don't use a torque wrench to re-install, I paint mark the position of the nut before I remove it, then re-align the marks. After a couple of cycles, I moved to the next tighter hole for the lock pin.
 

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I hope you shined everything up and lubed the lube needing parts..
Looking back, a trip to the dealer and let them do it mayhave been less exciting and less labour intensive
Fun HUH?:D
 

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Single Sided Swing Arm Wheel Removal/Replacement 2009 M1100S

Ladies and Gents,

My name is Matt and I am new to this forum. I helped a friend out with a wheel replacement on his 2009 Monster 1100s. Here is a quick video we made if you have never done it before. I get a lot of advice from forums and thought I would give a bit back. Let me know how I did.

Thanks!!!

REMOVAL:

https://youtu.be/u1b1t_-p15E

REPLACEMENT:

https://youtu.be/IFSQEheLcE4
 

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The torque value is 180 foot pounds so it does take a bit of force to turn. I expect the guys at Ducati Seattle (excellent dudes) actually did the job properly which is why it is tight.

Even though this is an old post , here"s my reply -180 ft. lbs of torque is not really that hard to achieve , one of my torque wrenches goes to 300 ft.lbs so 180 is a pc. of cake for that particular wrench . Ducati Seattle probably forgot to lubricate the wheel shaft threaded end and nut as stated in the manual , this is a must for easy removal the next time .
 

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Bill A,

Shops a have a hard time getting tires on because they put the wheel in the machine wrong side up.
This puts the recess in the rim for the tire out of position and the tire has to be stretched to much to get it over the rim.

I watched my wheel spin in the machine as the guy tried to get the tire on. He ripped the bead on the tire, which scraped that brand new tire.
The manager got involved and showed the guy he had the wheel wrong side up in the machine. He flipped the rim over in the machine and the new tire went right on the rim. So strain, No pain.

Above is the story of the second time I let these guys try to change my tire. The story of the first time involved sending my virgin wheel to a paint shop for touch up work. #uckers.

I now go some where else. This guy knows the proper technique, and the machine mounts the tire with no strain at all. He charges me less also, and my rim comes home with no damage. I am going there today after work to mount and balance a new Q3 on the rear.

Thanks Jim, Advanced Cycle Services
 
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