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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well after riding shafts for a long time I now need to know how I go about changing my chain and sprokets. At the moment mine still looks pretty decent , I've covered 23,000 klms . what I need to know is :-

Do I have to brake the chain to remove?
Do I replace chain and sprockets at the same time?
Where can I but the sprockets ?
what type of chain is best ?
What is the chain size and type currently on the bike ?

Thanks
 

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1. Yes you will need to break the chain to get it off.

2. You should replace as a set especially in this case where the chain is stretched enough to need replacement…It will make your new chain and sprockets last that much longer.

3. Online, is usually cheapest but you guys from Australia need to factor shipping, taxes??? I’m sure your fellow Aussie’s can give better advice than me. I will say I prefer www.Supersprox.com (think it was originally Krause Racing) They provide lifetime warranties for kits, which can really pay for itself. I like the lightweight 3 piece sprockets and I have had great service from them custom making sprocket kits for other bikes in the past.

4. Personal preference, I’ve always used RK or DID X ring with no problems…My Tusbaki (sure I spelled that wrong) seemed to wear out faster.

5. 530 O ring (not sure about brand).

I’m sure you’ve already seen all the posts about 14 tooth sprockets etc, if not check them out for more info on chain and sprockets
Good Luck!
 

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Mister Bails,

Have a look here at the excellent write up by Andy on chain maintenance here:
Motorcycle Info Pages - 'How to' & FAQs > MTS1200 Chain Adjustment

Andy has made a few batches of a chain adjustment tool. I have one and it works really well and way better than the dinky one on the tool kit.



The details are on his site.

The official ducati workshop manual is on-line here: Home

Look under section 7 - Chassis / 14 - final drive

This shows replacing the sprockets and replacing the chain with a chain breaker and chain pin press. This shows a Ducati version of the tool but you can buy them from bike shops are have a good shop fit the chain for you.

I am not sure I would be happy with a clip style joining link on this bike. If you have a chain failure, it will be the link and the riveted type are stronger and no clip to fatigue or be knocked off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the info, Tim I have the bigger adjuster, although I don't think I purchased from Andy. I was more wanting to know alternatives for chain , sprockets etc , so I can get hold of them for when I need to replace. I know the dealer will do, but if the choice is Ducati chain at dealer prices as oppossed to a better quality chain at similar or cheaper then I would like to be prepared and buy before I need to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just occurred to me . Has anyone had a chain fail on the MTS ? I tour a lot and haven't considered carrying chain mending equipment !
 

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Tim and TiDuc have you well covered there...

Regarding the chain, just look at the top brands like, DID (my preferred choice) and see what length you need (links).
D.I.D Racing Chains and DirtStar® Rims

I bought a chain breaker and stake tool to do my first chain and sprocket replacement (zx-14) a few years back. Just take your time staking the rivets, measure each time you tighten, other than that it's really quite easy.
 

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Back in my dirt bike days I had many chain failures from riding in sand (Stradbroke Island) with the old clip joining link chains. The failure every time was the link clip. I used to routinely carry a spare chain link. This was even up to my first Triumph Tiger 900. SInce then I have had riveted chains and never had one fail.

I am pretty rigorous with chain cleaning, lube and tension. I think that chains will stretch as they wear and chew out the sprockets. Replace them all as a set long before there is a problem. I think that the main problem with this bike would be due to poor maintenance and a very loose chain becoming derailed. I would hate to be riding this bike if that ever happened.

Check posts 21 and 23 of the " Chain failed today at 120" thread linked above. That guy's chain looked like he soaked it in a 50/50 mix of rock salt and battery acid every night. Pure corrosion probably from road salt and 0, nothing, nada maintenance looks like it caused so much rust that the chain sideplate failed.

I understand that the standard MTS chains are Regina brand. I would not replace them with the same chain as the chain sure does rust if uncoated in lube. There is no surface protection on the metal at all.

My maintenance tools for the chain are a rag, small can of lube and chain adjustment tools.

Have you tried chaingang in Brisbane?
Chain Gang Sprockets

They made me a set for one of my old Triumphs and it was pretty good. They will make you a set from your worm ones if they have not seen the bike before but one they have the pattern they make them to order in a few days and supply DID chains. They also have Supersprox brand sprockets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good info on the chain gang site,

"Based on the average feedback, most riders obtain 25,000 kilometres from there OEM Chain and sprockets and 20,000 kilometres from the aftermarket options using the same gearing and chain selection. Chain Gang on Average delivers 50,000 kilometres, more than double the OEM, and in many cases a much higher result was achieved."

They do not have the MTS listed but I'll send an e-mail and get some info.

Thanks
 

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Mr Bails,
They list the 1198. Maybe the sprockets are the same? Anyone know for sure?

I used Chaingang sprockets some time ago. At the time they did not have my bike listed either. I had to rip the sprockets of the bike on a Sunday, posted the worn out sprockets (no chain of course) to them and they had the new ones made powdercoated and mailed to be in Sydney by Friday and I was riding on Saturday morning. They use the worn ones to get the shape, mounting holes right and any dishing offset if any. I never replaced these on that bike before I sold it but I surely did more than 50K km on them.

They can also make the new sprockets in any tooth number or chain size you like. Probably for a few more bucks they would make the standard 15 tooth size and a 14 tooth as well so you can try both. Buy a few extra DID joining links and you can pick and choose. People have talked about using 520 chains for weight saving but I think the bike designers specced 530 for a good reason.

And finally, when I bought the chain gang sprockets I chose to have the rear powdercoated in a light blue to match the bike. GAAAGGGG. Looked hideous. Don't do this.
Now they use 2-pack paint so choose colour wisely if you go this way.
 

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Not liking chains...

After my recent trip I have over 20,000 miles on the original chain/sprockets; probably time for replacement soon. What a f*&$%#@ing pain! Not just removal of sprockets (done that)...the whole "chain experience." And yes, I use the "new" DuPont teflon chain lube (the little squirt bottle).

When I threw the chain off my 1969 Honda CB750 (yes, a sand-cast original of which I was first owner) I swore I'd never have another chain.

If the MTS1200S and I part ways over the winter (depends on upcoming trip) the chain final drive will share somewhat of the blame. A chain on a bike with "touring" in the designation? Bad idea.

Not wanting to start a flame war here...just fed up with chains. Never liked 'em on a pushbike either...

--Doc
 

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After my recent trip I have over 20,000 miles on the original chain/sprockets; probably time for replacement soon. What a f*&$%#@ing pain! Not just removal of sprockets (done that)...the whole "chain experience." And yes, I use the "new" DuPont teflon chain lube (the little squirt bottle).

When I threw the chain off my 1969 Honda CB750 (yes, a sand-cast original of which I was first owner) I swore I'd never have another chain.

If the MTS1200S and I part ways over the winter (depends on upcoming trip) the chain final drive will share somewhat of the blame. A chain on a bike with "touring" in the designation? Bad idea.

Not wanting to start a flame war here...just fed up with chains. Never liked 'em on a pushbike either...

--Doc
I personally dont find shaft drive or belt to be real prizes either, they all have drawbacks. I had the top u joint on my old v65 sabre completly lock up on me once. On that bike there was no maint you could do for it, just wait for it to fail. A friend of mine just lost the final drive on his concours last week and its going to be a pricey repair from what he has told me.
 

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OK, ok, I take some of that back...

Just did a check on my chain after 20,557 miles...

1. 16 links of the chain measure a bit over 255 mm. FSM says replace chain if it's longer than 256.5 mm. So I guess my chain isn't quite ready for replacement.

2. Wheel sprocket looks worn very little.

3. Engine "pinion" sprocket (we always called 'em countershaft sprockets) is worn even less!

So I guess after all my ranting, my final drive is in better shape than I thought. Perhaps chain technology has improved somewhat since 1969 :)

--Doc
 

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Dr Greg,
It somewhat depends on your experience.
I have had my bike 2 years and at 26,000KM the chain and sprocket have lots of life left. I lube and clean my chain about once every 2 weeks. I spray lube on, wipe excess off with a rag - thats the clean bit - done. It really helps to have a centre stand to do this.

Quite a few years ago, I have a BMW R100GS that had 14,000KM on the clock that broke the rear paralever uni-joint at speed and locked the rear wheel at speed in the middle of Western Australia. :eek:. I am not a control freak and I know most shafts are fault free and I know chains can break and lock the rear wheel BUT I have some control over chain maintenance and replacement while a broken shaft is BANG...... No control over that. Some German engineer is in control of my skin integrity.

I am not flaming but to me, a chain is easy to maintain, weighs less, adsorbs less engine power and are actually pretty cheap to replace. Not adding 10KG or so to the MTS is a good choice.

And yes, chains have come a long way. When I was a kid I would ride on sand hills that were sand mining tailings that looked like sand off black sand paper and were basically carborundum grit. Want to see chain wear when there were no o-rings or X-rings! I could leave home with a well adjusted chain and come home with chain links literally dragging on the ground and a tinkling noise and the stretched chain chewed out the aluminium rear sprocket and spread silver fairy dust on the ground.

And P.S.
About chains on bikes. Seen this:

Mad string driven bike. Looks complex and heavy but no oil on the chain. If you are interested, Google "stringbike". I seriously like this but it won't fit on my front wheel drive recumbent without serious engineering.
 

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I understand that the standard MTS chains are Regina brand. I would not replace them with the same chain as the chain sure does rust if uncoated in lube. There is no surface protection on the metal at all.
The irony is that the Regina chain supplied on the MTS is made specially in that finish. The same spec chain you or I would buy as general public has the gold finishing (and it's a good chain).

Nice one Ducati :rolleyes:
 
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