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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody,


Not sure where to post this to get the best answer as we aren’t even really sure how to ID the bike. Let me know if there’s somewhere else this belongs. Looking for some help on where to start.

My dad got this bike years ago as payment of a debt.

We are both more car guys than bike guys, but would like to get the thing up and running again as it has basically been a decoration since he got it. Willing to learn obviously. We want to do a full refresh, clean out the fuel tank, new fuel filter, new lines, spark plug etc. Anything else we shouldn’t forget to do on these after sitting for ~10 years? Should I at least open the valve cover up and see how we’re looking gunk-wise before going any further? Again - car guy. Don’t know a ton about bikes.

First step obviously will be figuring out what we have as its tough to order parts without a year or model.

He rode it home from the guy’s house when he got it and it’s been in the living room since for safe keeping. Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the link. Looks like the mark 3 only ran for a few years and had a single engine option? So that’s all we would need to know!
 

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The 250 and 350 Mark 3D ran from'68-'71. The 450 Mark 3D from '69-'71. Assuming it has its original engine it is a 350 model (DM350 stamp on left case). Definitely not the original carburetor.

Hopefully, the title was also provided when 'payment' was made. Awfully nice looking machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I figured that I guess. Lol. More wondering about how we can find the year and what engine it has.
The 250 and 350 Mark 3D ran from'68-'71. The 450 Mark 3D from '69-'71. Assuming it has its original engine it is a 350 model (DM350 stamp on left case). Definitely not the original carburetor.

Hopefully, the title was also provided when 'payment' was made. Awfully nice looking machine.
Yes! I guess I made it sound a bit dodgy, but nothing like that. it was a friend of his who owed him the money so the title came with it happily.

Thanks for the info. will have to dig into it a little bit i suppose. Any tips on how to figure out if the engine itself is an original 350 or something else?
 

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Well, the cases are stamped 'DM350' so, there's the first clue. Beyond that, you'd need to measure the barrel height or count the # of fins. I don't recall the height (or fin count) of the 350 vs the 250. Someone else here will be able to.

I misspoke about the carburetor. In '69, the VHB was fitted as standard. That at least eliminates (mostly) the possibility of yours being a '68.
 

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Bon Vivant
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I'm restoring one of these right now. Its a 69 or 70 Mark 3 Desmo 350. Early bikes had a twin filler tank and mid 1970 switched to different gauges. The carb is original, seat looks to have been reupholstered otherwise the rest of the bike looks very original and yes the numbers are correct for that to be the original engine. It looks to be in exceptional condition. These bikes were usually ridden hard and not cared for much. The Mark 3 Desmo is very collectable and as far as Ducati singles go this is one of the more desirable bikes. You have a real nice bike there! Please dont start modifying it ;)
 

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Bon Vivant
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And just to let you know, the bars were either added by the previous owner or they may have been swapped by the dealer or importer. These bikes came from the factory equipped with clip-on bars. But many were sold in NA with the bars that you have, Dealers installed them because American buyers didnt like the lower "racer" style bars

They were offered as a 250, a 350 or a 450 and you could get both Desmo and spring valve versions. Desmos being much more desirable to collectors today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, the cases are stamped 'DM350' so, there's the first clue. Beyond that, you'd need to measure the barrel height or count the # of fins. I don't recall the height (or fin count) of the 350 vs the 250. Someone else here will be able to.

I misspoke about the carburetor. In '69, the VHB was fitted as standard. That at least eliminates (mostly) the possibility of yours being a '68.
I'm restoring one of these right now. Its a 69 or 70 Mark 3 Desmo 350. Early bikes had a twin filler tank and mid 1970 switched to different gauges. The carb is original, seat looks to have been reupholstered otherwise the rest of the bike looks very original and yes the numbers are correct for that to be the original engine. It looks to be in exceptional condition. These bikes were usually ridden hard and not cared for much. The Mark 3 Desmo is very collectable and as far as Ducati singles go this is one of the more desirable bikes. You have a real nice bike there! Please dont start modifying it ;)
I promise we won’t butcher it! ? on that note: are there good places (online) to find OEM or OEM replica parts for these older Ducatis?
Spent most of today taking things apart and figuring what to replace. there’s a couple of things need replacing so would like to find a good source.

Pulled the battery (pretty cheesy looking) so need a new one of those for sure. Not sure how standard these are. Never really seen a battery with an integrated solid rubber case like this.

Drained and changed oil, changed spark plug and wire. Checked gaskets and RTV’d one that had a bit of damage. Would be good to find new gaskets too, but again not sure where a good source is for quality parts...

It’s clean under the valve covers! Hardly any carbon buildup even.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
And just to let you know, the bars were either added by the previous owner or they may have been swapped by the dealer or importer. These bikes came from the factory equipped with clip-on bars. But many were sold in NA with the bars that you have, Dealers installed them because American buyers didnt like the lower "racer" style bars

They were offered as a 250, a 350 or a 450 and you could get both Desmo and spring valve versions. Desmos being much more desirable to collectors today.
interesting. So could be a dealer option but hard to say I guess. Cool! Thanks for the info
 

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Bon Vivant
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The only place I know for parts in the US is Moto Guzzino In the UK I use Classic Ducati or Lacey Ducati, there are others. I've also purchased from Back to Classics which is in the Netherlands (I think). If you go to motoscrubs you can find a large list of suppliers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The only place I know for parts in the US is Moto Guzzino In the UK I use Classic Ducati or Lacey Ducati, there are others. I've also purchased from Back to Classics which is in the Netherlands (I think). If you go to motoscrubs you can find a large list of suppliers.
Thanks! I’ll check all of these out and see who ships to Canada ??
 

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You can also try:- http://www.oldracingspareparts.com/ which is where most dealers get their parts from. You just have to be patient with them. I am with flynbulldog on keeping the bike original. Here is a photo of a 250 non desmo I restored some years ago. It had the early twin filler tank and the tank sides were painted silver rather than the chrome of the desmo. Cheers, Ian
976970
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You can also try:- http://www.oldracingspareparts.com/ which is where most dealers get their parts from. You just have to be patient with them. I am with flynbulldog on keeping the bike original. Here is a photo of a 250 non desmo I restored some years ago. It had the early twin filler tank and the tank sides were painted silver rather than the chrome of the desmo. Cheers, Ian
View attachment 976970
amazing this is perfect thanks Ian. Looks like they supply just about any part one could want. No excuses not to keep everything original now...

Great looking bike you have there! Super clean.
 

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Please don't put "replica" or "reproduction" parts on it!

Anything that needs work you should find a quality craftsman to repair or refurbish it, but only if it's needed to make it run or stop it falling apart. reproduction parts will devalue that stunning bike just as quick as anodised tat.

That bike is extremely collectible, it's condition and the faults that it may have add to it's desirability, they're only original once, it's taken a long time for that realisation but the days of pristine restorations commanding the most cash are gone.
Most collectible are original bikes in perfect condition.

closely followed by original bikes in very good unmolested condition (yours i'd say)

followed by, and a ways behind i'll add, a perfect restoration with period correct original parts (correct ID numbers, years cast in etc. period correct paint in the standard from the factory for that time (Perfect does not come close to correct!)
then (and often on par with a perfect restoration) is barn find in complete and original condition

Restored or tinkered with bikes with any reproduction parts languish at the bottom and make no mistake, a discerning collector can spot replica stuff a mile away, just as easy as spotting the wrong carb on a bike.

That 350D Mk3 is money in the bank as if if it runs, get it appraised by a knowledgeable auction house that is willing to represent it properly and you will make a tidy sum.
 

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Bon Vivant
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I've been collecting and restoring cars and bikes most of my life and it is true that there are certain buyers that prefer ratty old bikes that have never been altered but I think loony88's assertion is a little too strong and one I dont agree with. I'd Rather reproduction parts than modified bikes - cafe racers, trackers, choppers, bobbers etc are the bikes that loose all of their value and often times it can never be recovered.

But I still know people who prefer to buy bikes that look showroom fresh and do not want "barn fresh" machines. The only thing that has really changed is what we think is representative of a new bike. I personally do not like bikes with patina, And people somehow now believe that Ducatis came new with patina. They didnt. Chrome was bright, engines were shiny foundry fresh with polished covers, and paint looked good - at least for a year or so.

However, certain bikes, very very rare untouched - unmolested bikes, should be left untouched. In my opinion I don't believe your mark 3 with its repaint and reupholstery qualifies as one of those. At this point it has been worked on so it's fine to bring it up to any level of condition that makes you happy, but it makes the most sense to stick with original (or correct reproduction) parts.

A few years ago I found a mach1 in very good original condition. The bike had never been painted nor molested, some parts had been changed but all of the original parts were there in a box next to the bike. I swapped the correct parts back onto the bike and within a month I sold it. I knew this bike should not be restored to the level that I like and I just didnt enjoy it as it was. That is a very rare bike and a very rare scenario and for those bikes I would agree with loony88 but 99.9% of all old Ducatis will not reach that status.

Your bike is very close to that and I personally would not restore it but I think its fine to repair your bike, get it running and ride and enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I've been collecting and restoring cars and bikes most of my life and it is true that there are certain buyers that prefer ratty old bikes that have never been altered but I think loony88's assertion is a little too strong and one I dont agree with. I'd Rather reproduction parts than modified bikes - cafe racers, trackers, choppers, bobbers etc are the bikes that loose all of their value and often times it can never be recovered.

But I still know people who prefer to buy bikes that look showroom fresh and do not want "barn fresh" machines. The only thing that has really changed is what we think is representative of a new bike. I personally do not like bikes with patina, And people somehow now believe that Ducatis came new with patina. They didnt. Chrome was bright, engines were shiny foundry fresh with polished covers, and paint looked good - at least for a year or so.

However, certain bikes, very very rare untouched - unmolested bikes, should be left untouched. In my opinion I don't believe your mark 3 with its repaint and reupholstery qualifies as one of those. At this point it has been worked on so it's fine to bring it up to any level of condition that makes you happy, but it makes the most sense to stick with original (or correct reproduction) parts.

A few years ago I found a mach1 in very good original condition. The bike had never been painted nor molested, some parts had been changed but all of the original parts were there in a box next to the bike. I swapped the correct parts back onto the bike and within a month I sold it. I knew this bike should not be restored to the level that I like and I just didnt enjoy it as it was. That is a very rare bike and a very rare scenario and for those bikes I would agree with loony88 but 99.9% of all old Ducatis will not reach that status.

Your bike is very close to that and I personally would not restore it but I think its fine to repair your bike, get it running and ride and enjoy it.
I really don’t think it is a museum quality piece that should be locked up in a showroom.On top of that, we don’t intend to do much to it aside from bringing it to the point it can be ridden one Sunday a month or so. And even then we would use OEM parts if possible, and keep the removed original parts in a box indoors so that they can be returned to the bike if desired.

As you say, both my dad and I believed it had been repainted, and we know for certain it has been reupholstered as it was the previous owner who had that done. In addition, the previous owner RODE the bike as it was intended. In fact, he rode it fairly often, which makes me think the head gaskets, air cleaner filter etc are likely not the ones from the factory anyways.

Of course, we intend to replace any parts with OEM (IF NEEDED) and to be honest it will not need much. This is why I asked for suppliers for OEM parts, as this is obviously our first choice.

All in all though, I don’t see why it would be a crime to get this bike to the point that it can actually be ridden and enjoyed the odd Sunday. Some parts on there (particularly the battery and one of the gaskets, it’s not like we’re replacing the whole top end here!) need to go for this to be possible


Now, if we are saying this is a museum or high-caliber collectors piece that is one thing, but for some reason I don’t believe it is.

Correct me if I am wrong and I will convince him not to touch the thing!
 

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Bon Vivant
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I really don’t think it is a museum quality piece that should be locked up in a showroom.On top of that, we don’t intend to do much to it aside from bringing it to the point it can be ridden one Sunday a month or so. And even then we would use OEM parts if possible, and keep the removed original parts in a box indoors so that they can be returned to the bike if desired.

As you say, both my dad and I believed it had been repainted, and we know for certain it has been reupholstered as it was the previous owner who had that done. In addition, the previous owner RODE the bike as it was intended. In fact, he rode it fairly often, which makes me think the head gaskets, air cleaner filter etc are likely not the ones from the factory anyways.

Of course, we intend to replace any parts with OEM (IF NEEDED) and to be honest it will not need much. This is why I asked for suppliers for OEM parts, as this is obviously our first choice.

All in all though, I don’t see why it would be a crime to get this bike to the point that it can actually be ridden and enjoyed the odd Sunday. Some parts on there (particularly the battery and one of the gaskets, it’s not like we’re replacing the whole top end here!) need to go for this to be possible


Now, if we are saying this is a museum or high-caliber collectors piece that is one thing, but for some reason I don’t believe it is.

Correct me if I am wrong and I will convince him not to touch the thing!
I think you are spot on. Fix it up and enjoy it! (y)
 

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I would like to add that the reproduction parts from Old Racing Spare Parts are perfect reproductions and are often made by the suppliers that made the originals for the factory, so if you need parts and new old stock is not available, then new parts are the only option.
 
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