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916S - While riding last nite I thought it was raining, then I realized that I live in Phoenix Arizona ( no rain for the past 130 days straight!) When I stopped, I noticed the wiped up fluid on the INSIDE of my windscreen and all over my helmet appeared to be coolant. In the dark I could NOT see were the leak was coming from. This morning there was NO leaks around the bike in the garage. It seems like its a small sepage forward of the gas tank. Anyone else run into this problem?
 

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You've got a small leak in the cooling tank. Pretty typical for the 9x6's.
 

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Go to your dealer (or go through Ducati Seattle) and get a coolant catch tank.

Pop your seat up, remove the rubber piece at the two pins, then remove the two pins that hold your seat on at the pivot point.

Remove the bolt that holds down the back of the fuel tank. Lift the back of the tank up and support with a piece of wood. Detach the quick disconnect fittings and vent line. Detach the electrical connector(s) to the tank.

slide the fuel tank back and remove.

right under the key, you'll see a white polypropylene tank shaped like a codpiece. At the point where the top horizontal section comes back and goes vertical (at that bend) is where you'll see (or not see) a crack. Fill it up and warm up the bike - you'll definitely see it .

again, IIRC, you'll need to unbolt the ignition switch, remove that tank, remove the stuff on that tank and place it all onto the new tank. Then put it all back together. fill the tank and warm up the bike (until the thermostat opens up) you'll see the fluid level drop - put more fluid in - you' want to get all the air out of the system.

Then pop the filler cap back on, put on the fuel tank, hook it up , bolt it down, put the seat back on, wash your hands, get your gear on, and go for a nice ride up to Sedona and back. have a beer for me while you're there.

You might as well learn to do this because, chances are, it will happen again - bit it's a cheap fix.


REDDUC1 said:
916S - While riding last nite I thought it was raining, then I realized that I live in Phoenix Arizona ( no rain for the past 130 days straight!) When I stopped, I noticed the wiped up fluid on the INSIDE of my windscreen and all over my helmet appeared to be coolant. In the dark I could NOT see were the leak was coming from. This morning there was NO leaks around the bike in the garage. It seems like its a small sepage forward of the gas tank. Anyone else run into this problem?
 

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if you're going to run regular coolant or watter wetter in az be prepared to go through this twice every summer and once during the rest of the year for good measure.

however, you can avoid this by running evan's npg-r coolant (make sure it's the "r"...it was developed specifically for the crappy ducati cooling system). it's a low pressure coolant and will keep the expansion tanks from building up enough pressure to leak. i'm in the phoenix area and since switching last summer have yet to have another problem with expansion tank leaks.
 

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Hey Mikey,

Can you use the Evans product at tracks where regular coolant is prohibited?

I've been tempted to try it out but dont' want to flush and fill prior to trackdays.

Thanks.

chiromikey said:
if you're going to run regular coolant or watter wetter in az be prepared to go through this twice every summer and once during the rest of the year for good measure.

however, you can avoid this by running evan's npg-r coolant (make sure it's the "r"...it was developed specifically for the crappy ducati cooling system). it's a low pressure coolant and will keep the expansion tanks from building up enough pressure to leak. i'm in the phoenix area and since switching last summer have yet to have another problem with expansion tank leaks.
 

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Buckelew said:
Hey Mikey,

Can you use the Evans product at tracks where regular coolant is prohibited?

I've been tempted to try it out but dont' want to flush and fill prior to trackdays.

Thanks.
npg-r is the only evan's coolant that DOES contain a ratio of propylene glycol mixed with ethylene glycol so if your track/sanctioning body prohibits any propylene glycol and you don't want to do the flush then npg-r isn't for you. i do know of people that have been able to run regular evan's npg in their ducatis. some report a slightly higher running temp...some don't. even with the higher temps, i have yet to see/hear of an expansion tank blowing with this stuff.

i was informed that clean up for the npg-r is no different than any pure ethylene glycol based coolants but rules are rules...regardless of their efficacy or if they're outdated.

if you don't mind the flush for occassional trackdays or have a street only bike then spend the money on it. the propylene glycol in the "r" coolant not only increases boiling temps to 400* while still maintaining a low pressure system, but more importantly it drastically reduces viscosity compared to npg or npg+. it's the viscosity in the non "r" products that can prevent ducs from cooling properly and the reason for the developement of essentially a ducati specific coolant and a product outside of evan's promoted product line.

i hope that didn't sound too much like a commercial and i have no affiliation with this company. i've been fortunate enough to be able to speak with a few people high up in the r&d department at evan's.
 
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