Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know this has been asked across a few threads somewhere before. I just got my termi's and they are being installed this next Tues. I have wanted to do header wrap since I got the bike...and nows the time.

Questions - who has done it - what is your experience - what did you use - where didja get it - any tricks to doing it right - white or black?

I know there were a few of us kicking this idea around...Nimi did you ever get yours done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
I did mine with 2" black tape from summitracing.com. I was not able to use the nice thin stainless steel ties that they sold. I could not get them to be as tight as i wanted. I ended up using some clamps from the hardware store. I also painted the wrap with the silicon paint that they sold. It's less messy if you spray it into a container and use a brush to apply. Also, wetting the tape as you go will make it easier with the wrapping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
I did my Thuxton . Got mine from www.1tail.com . IT wasn't hard and by looking at the Sportclassics shouldn't be hard either .
All the myths about wrapping are ...Well... Mostly myths. It will weaken the integrity of your pipes . Over 30-40 years. Just like ceramic would .
As for performance I ddin't feel a significant gain but you can feel the wrap disspate the heat from the pipes . Maybe a 1-2 hp gain if any .
You shouldn't really beat around the bush on it though. Just try it . 70$ + 15$ for the good stainless ties. And you can do it yourself . Takes a while to get the hang of it but it is no ways hard . And if you don't like it cut it off.
I checked under mine on the chrome and it did aid to blueing some but who cares . Personally I think the GTs would look trick with wrapped pipes . :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
RoxyNoDuc said:
I did my Thuxton . Got mine from www.1tail.com . IT wasn't hard and by looking at the Sportclassics shouldn't be hard either .
All the myths about wrapping are ...Well... Mostly myths. It will weaken the integrity of your pipes . Over 30-40 years. Just like ceramic would .
As for performance I ddin't feel a significant gain but you can feel the wrap disspate the heat from the pipes . Maybe a 1-2 hp gain if any .
You shouldn't really beat around the bush on it though. Just try it . 70$ + 15$ for the good stainless ties. And you can do it yourself . Takes a while to get the hang of it but it is no ways hard . And if you don't like it cut it off.
I checked under mine on the chrome and it did aid to blueing some but who cares . Personally I think the GTs would look trick with wrapped pipes . :D
Thanks for the link - nice info on the site. Which width and length did you get? I was looking at the 2" 50' size with the 8" SS straps. Which did you use?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,821 Posts
"It will weaken the integrity of your pipes . Over 30-40 years. Just like ceramic would."

Uh, not many motorcycle pipes last 30-40 years WITHOUT wrap - in fact, almost none. Ceramic coating is one thing that possibly COULD make them last 40 years. I think it is extremely likely that the wrap does decrease life, but there's another big factor.

Race bikes (and cars, since that article is mostly about cars) keep their headers much hotter than than street riding normally does. This article is talking about cars, and their headers are not out in free air like ours. Combine wrap, the protected environment of the engine compartment, AND race temperatures, and I can see how header life could be severely compromised.

As far as ceramic coatings, the author was correct that all the reputable coating companies coat inside and out. Wrap holds heat in the metal of the pipe. Inside and out coating does NOT hold heat in the metal - the inside coating insulates the pipe from the exhaust gases and the metal actually doesn't get as hot as an uncoated or a wrapped pipe does. Coating only the outside WOULD hold more heat in the metal itself.

If wrap gives you a little power boost on top, then it's worth it at the track, but it's not worth it to me on the street. As as I mentioned on a very different string, one makes very different compromises on a track bike than on a street bike. Often times the very best choice for either is the worst for the other. In this case, I think it simply does little good on the street. As an aesthetic choice, I find it to be a nice option if your headers are rusty, scratched, or otherwise messed up. It beats having to buy new ones, especially if they are no longer available. It also has the race "look," but if that was my interest, I'd have bought a different model (I have a GT).


As far as Roxy's comment on the GT, wrapping double wall pipes seems a little silly to me. It does even less to accomplish the intended goal, and the look doesn't fit with the GT to my eye. My guess is the Thruxton is double wall as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
All right what abouth cleaning ,after a raining day with mud and dirt ? I had my header polish, it stay clean all the time .So easy to clean when you wash your bike.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
413 Posts
wrapped pipes [on sport thou] with black tape. wet the tape before wrapping, and used the SS clamps [cranked them down with needle nose pliers]. installed the pipes on the bike and ran it to dry out the tape. it was delightfully loud, ha ha. took the pipes back off the bike after the drying session, and spray painted them with the correct paint [from the same manufacturer as the tape, sorry can't remember the name], and let them dry. reinstalled the pipes and termis. ran the bike, took a few days of running to bake the enamel onto the tape. took the bike out on a quiet freeway [well, it was quiet before we got there, anyway!] and ran 10-20 miles at triple digit speeds. this finished curing the enamel, caused a little of the powder coating on the termis' front pipes to flake off, and caused the lower [rear cylinder] termi sticker to have a charred appearance. it has not changed since then [1500 miles of spirited riding]. it probably does not make much if any more power, but it runs a good 20º cooler than my friend's otherwise identical bike [the motor likes that, si?], and looks tough as all get out. the down side? it was a lot of work, and i'm missing a small amount of paint [so what!] see photo of missing paint. enjoy!
p.s. i reread some of the other posts on this thread. wrapping your pipes will not cause them to dissolve [i have to wonder about the objectivity of a dissertation on pipe wrapping from a manufacturer of pipe coating (??)], but it certainly won't make them last longer. it may make my exhaust valves last longer from scavenging the heat away from the engine, but this [a microcosm of life itself, ha ha] is not for free. also, if you do this job properly [wet tape, apply, dry, paint, cure], you can't [best as i can tell] just yank the tape off if you decide you don't like it. count on removing the exhaust system, removing the tape/clamps, and refinishing the pipes. not "refinishing the tank" grade work, but a good couple four hours of your time. the tape was 1" black, with black enamel. by the way, i haven't had to clean them yet. i'm sure there's some road grime, but nothing obvious.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
bevel-man said:
All right what abouth cleaning ,after a raining day with mud and dirt ?
+1 what do these things look like after a couple thousand miles of grime blast from the front wheel?

my primaries have browned and i converted my cans to the worlds most expensive frame sliders, the wrap would be a nice way to cover the damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for posting all the pics.

My reason to do this is strictly cosmetic. As to how they may contribute to the destruction of the pipes themselves...? I'll be happy if I make it the next 40 years - if my pipes don't make it as long - I'm cool with that. As long as it doesn't blow up my engine somehow or completely f*ck things up...I'm still a go.

This is great info though on all sides...please continue to post if you have done this, or have an opinion either way. Very interested to hear about cleaning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,821 Posts
bevel-man said:
All right what abouth cleaning ,after a raining day with mud and dirt ? I had my header polish, it stay clean all the time .So easy to clean when you wash your bike.

If you do the silicone paint, mentioned by ct_mazi, that would make quite a difference in them cleaning up easy compared to just wrap. What the heck are you doing out in the rain anyway? It seems like everyone on this board has their electrics go belly up if there's a sprinkle. ;)


LA-DUC, if that's what you're looking for, I don't think you'll be disappointed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
v290rider said:
Thanks for the link - nice info on the site. Which width and length did you get? I was looking at the 2" 50' size with the 8" SS straps. Which did you use?

Thanks!
I used the 2" x 50' on mine . They say to do a 1/4 inch overlay but I did 1/2 overlay . It was more than enough. On the Ducs you can go with either 1" or the 2" . The 1" would be better on the intriquite parts but you'll be doing more wrapping obviously . But either or is fine . They say to wet it to help it bend easier but from weaving the wrap through the pipe ( some say to take the pipe off but I was just looking at the pipes on the sportclassics and it can be done on the bike ) while on the bike will loosen the wrap to make it bendable . It's not hard just redundant . Some also say to use gloves because of the fiberglass ( itchy itchy ) but I didn't need to and I didn't itch really. Plus with gloves on it's a pain in the balls. ;)
The 1tail site had the best overall deal when i was looking to buy since it was free shipping . Hope this helps .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
MajorSoftie said:
If you do the silicone paint, mentioned by ct_mazi, that would make quite a difference in them cleaning up easy compared to just wrap. What the heck are you doing out in the rain anyway? It seems like everyone on this board has their electrics go belly up if there's a sprinkle. ;)


LA-DUC, if that's what you're looking for, I don't think you'll be disappointed.
The silicone does help it repel water and gunk but it's mostly to prevent the wrap from fraying .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
RoxyNoDuc and MajorSoftie - thanks for the help. Some thoughts and a few more questions -

I am going to take the headers off to do the wrap. It seems this will just be easier while a matter of just a few bolts.

So this wetting deal - did you dunk the roll in water for a few seconds, or spray with a spray bottle as you applied? And the silicone spray - this is going to be a stoopid question - you just spray the wrapped pipe like you would a piece of furniture - or like you did your name on a wall in junior high with krylon 5 ball?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
413 Posts
LA-DUC said:
RoxyNoDuc and MajorSoftie - thanks for the help. Some thoughts and a few more questions -

I am going to take the headers off to do the wrap. It seems this will just be easier while a matter of just a few bolts.

So this wetting deal - did you dunk the roll in water for a few seconds, or spray with a spray bottle as you applied? And the silicone spray - this is going to be a stoopid question - you just spray the wrapped pipe like you would a piece of furniture - or like you did your name on a wall in junior high with krylon 5 ball?
unroll the tape and get it totally wet. apply [tightly]and secure the tape and let totally dry. the paint [not sure what the silicone spray referred to here is-i used spray paint that i bought from the fiberglass tape manufacturer. it cured from heat, and put a hard finish on the fiberglass tape] gets sprayed on, just like you were shooting paint on a gas tank, [without the prep work and wet sanding, et cetera].
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
No one has mentioned that the main reason for wetting the wrap is to prevent dust that can be inhaled and cause silicosis or similar disease depending on the wraps compostion. The dust from these wraps will kill you in a very nasty way if you breathe too much of it and make your life miserable if you just breathe a little of it. I have always dropped the roll of wrap into a bucket of water and let it sit for a good while until it gets pretty saturated. Water will not hurt the tape (at least the old stuff) but it will make it heavy. Once you wrap it, give it several hours to dry, it doesn't need to be completely dry but just damp before you start it for the first time. Running it will dry the rest of the water out the wrap and cook all the oils out of the wrap. (Even if you do not wet it to apply it, run it until it gets hot to cook the wrap as mentioned above.) Once it is dry and has heat cured, you can then paint it. Many of the good paints will require you to apply it to a cold wrap and heat cure it with the exhaust heat once again.

The most important thing for you to remember is to avoid making dust with that wrap that you may breathe during application or stir up later during a clean-up in your shop area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
3-D said:
No one has mentioned that the main reason for wetting the wrap is to prevent dust that can be inhaled and cause silicosis or similar disease depending on the wraps compostion. The dust from these wraps will kill you in a very nasty way if you breathe too much of it and make your life miserable if you just breathe a little of it. I have always dropped the roll of wrap into a bucket of water and let it sit for a good while until it gets pretty saturated. Water will not hurt the tape (at least the old stuff) but it will make it heavy. Once you wrap it, give it several hours to dry, it doesn't need to be completely dry but just damp before you start it for the first time. Running it will dry the rest of the water out the wrap and cook all the oils out of the wrap. (Even if you do not wet it to apply it, run it until it gets hot to cook the wrap as mentioned above.) Once it is dry and has heat cured, you can then paint it. Many of the good paints will require you to apply it to a cold wrap and heat cure it with the exhaust heat once again.

The most important thing for you to remember is to avoid making dust with that wrap that you may breathe during application or stir up later during a clean-up in your shop area.
You must be confusing fiberglass with asbestis . whoever told you that knew nothing about fiberglass or wrap. Fiberglass particles are straight edged so it will free itself from lung tissue . Not saying inhaling fiberglass particles is a great thing to do. Asbestis particles on the other hand are coiled and will imbed itself in lung tissue and continue to scar eventually becoming cancerous therefore.......
WRAPPING A SET OF DUCATI PIPES WILL NOT KILL YOU . :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
ANY small particles in your lung, including wood dust and
grain dust, can lead to really nasty conditions including cancer. My brother is a glass blower and I spend a lot of time in the shop working with similar products, none of it is good for you. Besides, you are making the assumption that you know what the insulation is entirely composed of and also forgetting that particle size makes a huge difference. Just ask for the MSDS on the stuff from the manufacturer if you have any question about its toxicity.
Besides, even if it does free itself from wherever it is initially stuck, it still has to get out without getting stuck again and thus starting the process over.
But in the end, they are your lungs to do with as you please.

A little more e-mailed to me from a doctor friend- When fine particles of dust are deposited in the lungs, macrophages that ingest the dust particles will set off an inflammation response by releasing tumor necrosis factors, interleukin-1, leukotriene B4 and other cytokines. In turn, these stimulate fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen around the particle, thus resulting in fibrosis and the formation of nodular lesions.

And from the MSDS I have-
Containment Procedures: Pick up any large pieces. Use high efficiency
vacuum to clean up spilled material. Use wet sweeping where sweeping is
necessary. Do not use compressed air for clean up.
Clean-Up Procedures: Collect material and place in a suitable container for
disposal as non-hazardous waste.
Engineering Controls: If dust is generated, provide local exhaust ventilation to
control airborne levels below ACGIH TLV-TWA exposure limit for Particulates
Not Otherwise Classified of 10mg/m3 for inhalable particles and 3mg/m3 for
respirable.
Personal Protective Equipment:
Eyes and Face: Wear safety glasses with side shields or goggles when
handling this material.
Skin: Use appropriate workplace clothing and procedures when using this
material
Respiratory: If airborne dust is present, use a NIOSH approved particulate
respirator. (3M 8710)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top