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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am going to try and remove the head studs on my 93 Superlight. I know one trick is to use the two nut (??) method but I would rather try to apply the torque as close to the threads in the cylinder as possible. I found this tool on Amazon which looks like it would allow me to me to get down pretty far on the stud. Thoughts on this tool or others?

 

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93 900ss,2019 Triumph 1200XE, 2017 CRF250L RALLY, 2003 F650GS DAKAR, 1993 KLR250, 1986 HONDA TLR20
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I like these they can still be had but don't buy a Chinese copy. use two wrenches or a T handle you want to have your force more radial then a ratchet or wrench on one side. A long stud will go through the socket so it can be near the base.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I like these they can still be had but don't buy a Chinese copy. use two wrenches or a T handle you want to have your force more radial then a ratchet or wrench on one side. A long stud will go through the socket so it can be near the base. View attachment 1036828


View attachment 1036828
Thank you. Can you pls explain why I would need to use two wrenches? It looks like to me the stud would go through this tool and I would use a wrench on the hex portion of the tool
 

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93 900ss,2019 Triumph 1200XE, 2017 CRF250L RALLY, 2003 F650GS DAKAR, 1993 KLR250, 1986 HONDA TLR20
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In my opinion using two wrenches make it like a T handle so your pushing and pulling radially. One ratchet or wrench will work too but if its real tight it will tend to want to bend.
 

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Are you hoping to reuse the studs? If the answer is no, jam two nuts together, get a torch and heat the case around the stud until it's smoking (literally), and get on with it. Repeat 7 more times.

Even if the answer is yes ....
 

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Those roller type stud pullers work great if your not planning on reusing the stud if you are reusing it you need a threaded collet puller those thread on the stud & you clamp that into a holder that literally grips the threads (all of thrm) so you don't damage your threads.
If the stud is broken use anything you can find to grab ahold of it.
 

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SP3 posted while typing, and i agree with him.

Use two of the head bolts on the same stud. Lock the nuts together, uses a washer in between if you like. The lower nut should be upside down if it is flanged)

Using a wrench on the lower nut, unscrew the stud. (if you are using a box end wrench, slide it on the stud before putting the nuts on)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys. I have no intention of reusing the studs. I'll be replacing them. I understand the 2 nut method but my concern is that the torque is too far away from the threaded portion in the cylinder resulting in too much twisting force that could break the stud. This is why I want to be as close to the cylinder as possible.

I definitely intend to use heat. Do you guys think my heat gun will generate enough heat or do I need to a torch?
 

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Thanks guys. I have no intention of reusing the studs. I'll be replacing them. I understand the 2 nut method but my concern is that the torque is too far away from the threaded portion in the cylinder resulting in too much twisting force that could break the stud. This is why I want to be as close to the cylinder as possible.

I definitely intend to use heat. Do you guys think my heat gun will generate enough heat or do I need to a torch?

Heat gun will work. Put it on high and get it HOT - don't a pu$$y about it. 'torque away from the threads' won't be an issue.
 

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The head studs have a necked down area and the Stahwille type removers won't reliably grip the stud down low. The roller type is probably the way to go for this application. A torch is preferable as a heatgun would take forever due to the aluminum absorbing the heat quickly. Ideally a drop of water should sizzle when it touches the area around the stud. Pull the cylinder and grip the stud as low as you can.
 

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stainless studs? if they're going to come out easily, the two nuts will be enough with some heat.

if they've welded themselves in to the cases, no stud extractor will move them. cut the stud off and weld a nut down near the cases. repeat as many times as required, lots of heat and penetrant.
 

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I hope Ducati is smarter than using stainless fasteners in aluminum or god forbid magnesium you'll never get a busted bolt out of that stuff without a milling machine.

All my years playing with boats the first thing I did after a new purchase was take every single bolt, stud, screw, alien out of whatever...lube it with copper anti seize & put it back before I had to remove it 2 years later & busting the damn things off in a expensive component.

Don't think for a minute marine parts are wet more than bikes there not just look at how many times your hot engine has been in the rain or how many times you've washed it, plus there's that damn electrolysis thing going on also

STAINLESS FASTENERS SUCK
 

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stainless studs? if they're going to come out easily, the two nuts will be enough with some heat.

if they've welded themselves in to the cases, no stud extractor will move them. cut the stud off and weld a nut down near the cases. repeat as many times as required, lots of heat and penetrant.
The operative word here us "IF" there going to cooperate
 

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Hi, I am going to try and remove the head studs on my 93 Superlight. I know one trick is to use the two nut (??) method but I would rather try to apply the torque as close to the threads in the cylinder as possible. I found this tool on Amazon which looks like it would allow me to me to get down pretty far on the stud. Thoughts on this tool or others?

That's what I used years ago when I did my studs. Except the first one I used (one I'd had for years, and worked fine) didn't have enough hardening on the 'grip wheel' the rotates and grips the stud shaft, and left itself on the stud... The next one I bought had a much better hardening job, and worked fine. Just use LOTS of heat, as Ducati have used the thread lock from hell on those studs - and if you're not careful, you'll remove the aluminium thread from your cases at the same time as you remove the stud - it'll still be attached to the stud, leaving a smooth hole in your cases.
Do some searches on case stud removal in this forum, there's lots of info (including pics of my stud removers...).
 

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I had a lot of luck with acetone instead of heat. They all came out easily after putting a drop of it on the base and just working the stud back and forth a bit so it soaks in. Before that I tried heat (not enough) and couldn't get them to budge
 

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I used triple nuts and a lot of heat from a heat gun. Worked them back and forth once they sarted to move , moving it further each time until I could get a full rotation from them. Never had any sieze in place that I could not remove. Broken ones are a different story.
 

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How do you avoid damaging the painted surfaces of the engine with the acetone?
It's only a drop per stud so it doesn't really touch any exposed part of the paint. Either way, it didn't seem to damage the paint it did touch in my case.
 
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