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Discussion Starter #1
THe one broken head stud, broke flush. What do you recommend on doing to remove what is left?
 

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Pray.

You are about to embark on one of the shittiest jobs to need doing on a SS. Speaking from experience.

Read the stuff in the three links in this linked post: http://www.ducati.ms/forums/6063073-post34.html


Pray some more. ;)

Then REREAD the linked posts again - and have a go.

It IS possible to get the broken bit out, you just need to be persistent. As the linked posts show - there are several different methods which have been used, which have worked (I was one of the first - as far as I know - to do the 'weld a nut onto the end of the flush stud' trick). And quite a few which didn't.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have no intention of parting her out. THe internals, so far, have been in great shape. Other than this stud issue, she seems all good.
 

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I have no intention of parting her out. THe internals, so far, have been in great shape. Other than this stud issue, she seems all good.
Often the case with them. Be aware that the studs are hardened to a silly level (why they break), which means that ordinary drilling WILL NOT WORK! Add to that the thread lock Ducati used is from somewhere near hell, as it has to be as hot as before it releases. Anyway - read the posts - it's not really about parting out... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For removal, Chris from CA Cycleworks said that a good set of vice grips and let then right twisting, lube and a lot of patience is what is needed.
 

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I broke an exhaust stud on my multi - took it to a shop with a welder and they welded a nut on - I think the heat helps loosen the damned things too.
 

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I broke one on my '93 SS. I tried drilling it out for three days. I broke all sorts of screw extractors and bolt extractors. Finally, I wised up and took it to a local machine shop that specializes in car stuff - boring cylinders and grinding heads and stuff. They were able to get it out quickly for about $100. I should have taken it there to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK, got the cylinder up (too far, now I need a ring tool, darn it) and confirmed, totally flush, almost perfectly, actually. Looks like weld a nut time. Will it be a mig or a tig job??
 

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For removal, Chris from CA Cycleworks said that a good set of vice grips and let then right twisting, lube and a lot of patience is what is needed.
ROFL. Lube? Vice grips? :D I shredded a proper stud remover trying to get my intact studs out. Heat (LOTS of heat), and a proper stud remover with hardened 'grip' bits (that can grip the stud as close to the base (cases) as possible), and hope that the alloy thread in the case doesn't come out with the stud. If the stud's broken off flush or below the case level, then welding a nut on it (worked for me), or machining it out (if you can get a shop with the right tools to deal with those studs and threadlock) has also worked. Admittedly, I used penetrating oil and twisting the stud back and forth when I got my broken bits out - but that was with a lot of heat (residual from the welding) involved, and nuts welded onto the stud bits to enable gentle twisting.

Do a search on this forum on 'cylinder studs' - you'll get a lot of info.
 

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OK, got the cylinder up (too far, now I need a ring tool, darn it) and confirmed, totally flush, almost perfectly, actually. Looks like weld a nut time. Will it be a mig or a tig job??
READ THOSE POSTS that I linked you to. I'm NOT going to type it all out again :p ;) - there's a detailed description of what I did when I used the weld method on mine (which has been used since by another member), plus added bits that I'd forgotten initially. There are also detailed descriptions of things others tried, which also worked. I used a MIG. And LOTS of anti-spatter spray.
 

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the thing you need to remember here is that they will usually come out "pretty easily". heat and penetrant and they'll wind out within the safety margin. but then you might get that one, and it will have basically chemically welded itself into the cases. and no hand tool known to man will move it without exceeding the strength of the stud and breaking it off. it's good that yours is broken at the case level, because otherwise you can get false hope that what you have left will allow you to remove it easily.

if it is stuck, it's stuck.

the heat from welding something to the end of the stud will help. a few heat/spray/cool cycles will help too.

and the weld will break off, so you just weld it back on and do it enough times that eventually it moves and just winds out like there was nothing holding it in.

if you get very stuck you can edm them out. never got to that point though.
 

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My bike also came with the stock studs. I broke the threadlock with acetone. A couple drops per student is all it took, no heat whatsoever. After that they came out as if it was just blue loctite, didn't even use a stud puller, just two nuts countered together and a wrench.

I found this tip on some obscure thread here. I'm not sure if this is common knowledge or not.
 
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Find a machine shop the does EDM. Electrical Discharge Machining. They can remove it with no damage to surrounding case. As Bradblack said, this always works after everything else fails.
 

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Markwemple, these guys that are trying to help you know everything there is to know about theses bikes. There is absolutely nothing that is going to happen to your bike that hasn’t already happened to the rest of us. You need to learn to Search for old posts on the subject, then ask specific questions. Nobody wants to spend an hour retyping information that has already been covered completely.
 
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