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Well, haven't been on this forum in a long time, but I'm still enjoying my 2007 GT1000. A while back I purchased a second set of heads off eBay that I intended to rebuild with new valve guides then swap out. Finally got around to it, although it took me several months to complete. Here's what I did:

First I had a bunch of parts stripped. I had inherited a nice valve seat cutting set from my dad who was a master Harley tech. I purchased the correct pilots in order to make a 3 angle cut in the stock valve seats in the used heads I purchased. The heads certainly had WAY less miles than mine which had just over 80,000 miles on them. Threw the heads in my oven, pressed in new guides, and then cut the seats:
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Discussion Starter #2
Next up was tearing the bike down. I whipped up a little engine support stand and separated the frame from the motor.
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I also had a bunch of parts polished to clean them up for reassembly.
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All done. To re-cap - this top end rebuild included new valve guides, new valves, 3 angle seats, high comp Pistal pistons, balanced injectors, new plug wires & boots, all to compliment what I had already done to the bike: lightweight flywheel, spaghetti headers, Termignoni mufflers, DucShop velocity stacks, and Power Commander. First real ride today and it feels great! Smoother and freerer rev'ing at high RPM.
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Not bad for over 80,000 miles. Really impressed with how the bike has held up. Best purchase I ever made, and only new vehicle I've ever purchased.
 

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Hi Dietrich, long time no hear! Glad you are ok, thanks for posting all this stuff. Now for questions: did you have to hone the barrels to fit the pistons? There must have been a bit of glaze built up over the miles? I'm surprised that you could cut the valve seats with a hand cutter, I thought that the unleaded seats would be too hard to cut

Looking good.

Thanks,

Colin
 

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Good to see you here again, Dietrich.

Great write-up, thanks. Bike still looks great, too. I don't have nearly that many miles on my GT!

Were you having problems that prompted you to do this work?
 

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Hi Dietrich, long time no hear! Glad you are ok, thanks for posting all this stuff. Now for questions: did you have to hone the barrels to fit the pistons? There must have been a bit of glaze built up over the miles? I'm surprised that you could cut the valve seats with a hand cutter, I thought that the unleaded seats would be too hard to cut

Looking good.

Thanks,

Colin
Hey there, cool to see some of the original screen names on here! One crazy thing I learned tearing it apart was what good shape the motor was in. You could still see the factory crosshatching on the cylinder lining, so I didn't bother to hone. Lazy and risky perhaps. I did clean everything really well and made sure there wasn't a lip at the top of the stroke that could potentially damage the new rings. The seats were hard to cut! I went slow, and didn't really need to take that much material off to get them to the shape I wanted. The manual shows the desired contact for the valve and I just took my time and tried to make sure all 4 valves were as close as possible. I then lapped the valves by hand with valve lapping compound. The easily sealed up and didn't let a drop of water through.
 

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Good to see you here again, Dietrich.

Great write-up, thanks. Bike still looks great, too. I don't have nearly that many miles on my GT!

Were you having problems that prompted you to do this work?
The main reason I wanted to do this is I thought my valve guides were shot. Some of these DS1000 motors had problems with soft guides that wore out prematurely. I measured mine at one point and they had TONS of slop. That was 50,000 miles ago... The bike started, didn't smoke, and didn't use oil so I just kept riding. I always kept the valves adjusted carefully and exactly where I wanted them (only had a couple broken half rings over the years). The bike was getting harder to start, which can be a symptom of bad guides.

The funny part...the factory spec for guide clearance is much looser than you might expect. When I got to the part of honing the guides I was worried about getting them too loose, but again just took my time and aimed for the low end of the factory spec. I used Kibbelwhite nickel bronze guides and hopefully they hold up as long as the stock guides!
 

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Be aware after you cut the seats you will want to do your next valve adjust at a shorter interval. The seat material work hardens so your old seats would probably be fine going 10,000-12,000 miles between adjustments but often after cutting seats you will see some valve recession as the valve seats in on fresh cut materials. Given your skill in doing this I would check and adjust between 4000 and 6000 miles. simply break in again.

I am not surprised with your results with piston and cylinders as the oem parts are built for the long haul, many will need double the mileage to need replacement. This is why when customers say I will wait until I need new pistons to add performance I have to remind them it will usually be more miles than they will ever put on. As good as the pistals are I do not think they will last as long .... but you may smile more per mile.

Bike looks good with the polished covers.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Be aware after you cut the seats you will want to do your next valve adjust at a shorter interval.
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Bike looks good with the polished covers.
Thanks Ducvet! I plan to check/adjust the valves within 1,000 miles or so. I used the MBP upgraded valve clips from EMS. One thing I forgot to mention is that cutting the existing seats instead of starting with new seats did change the valve position enough that I had a tough time getting the correct shims to get everything adjusted. I have quite a collection of shims now so hopefully enough for a few more adjustments.
 

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Even with the MBP collets the wear in the system will be the valves pounding the seats deeper into the head thus sinking the valves. A wide non-performance seat sinks less than a race seat so depending on how wide you left the middle cut might factor as well. Ride it like you are going to and check at regular intervals and you will be fine. I just checked a set I cut last year on a track bike and they had moved about .004" I expect next check will be closer to .002" and when they settle I will extend intervals until we do it all again.
 

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That looks fantastic! I wish I had that kind of skill and patience. Love the oil level marking...funny!
 
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