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Discussion Starter #1
It's been a several years since I've posted. I've had my GT1000 (black & creme) since summer '08 and love the bike, which is nearly stock (except FatDuc O2 and CRG bar mirrors) and has just shy of 10k miles. I want to make some improvements to make it look and perform better, but I'm suffering from analysis paralysis. In what order would you make mods..highest cost benefit to lowest:

  • Exhaust (thinking Staintunes)
  • Suspension (thinking YSS and Fork kit)
  • Alloy wheels (better handling)
  • Brake upgrade
If I were to do all of the above, I'd be looking north of $5k, I only spent $9.5k on the bike to start with. I'm thinking $2k would be a reasonable start. The other option is to leave it alone and get a second used, more sport oriented bike...the GT will never be a Panigale.

Thanks.
 

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There are lots of threads on so many modification related subjects, where to start? The Sport Classics offer so many choices for modifications and you can make them over whatever timeframe and at whatever cost you choose.

IMHO there are no right or wrong answers regarding choice of exhaust, wheels, suspension mods - you pays your money & you takes your choices.

Much depends on your personal preferences for performance, looks, practicality or even noise.

Living in the UK I'm not sure what $2k would buy, but probably one of the lowest cost mods I made (with a very pleasing effect) was the swap to the 14-tooth front sprocket. You could start there & then work upwards to your budget as & when it suits you.

Have fun & keep us all posted.
 

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wheels should be your first choice .the lighter the better
it makes everything work much better
+1

Light alloy wheels will make the bike feel more like a modern bike, improve handling, braking, acceleration.

The OZ forged aluminum wheels are a direct bolt on. They are as light as 5 spoke marchesini magnesium wheels. They do not require brake calipers--yet can be used with aftermarket calipers if you choose to upgrade later.

There is a beautiful GT1000 in the classifieds with OZ wheels/custom tail among other things right now to give you an idea what is possible:

http://www.ducati.ms/forums/128-bikes/139371-feeler-fs-my-2007-gt1000-cafe-racer.html

-M
 

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thanks Moto - :)

i'd defenitely do the wheels first.. OZ's were magnificent 2 seconds after install.. dropped weight making the bike turn quicker and overall feel so much better.. then suspension.. i went with YSS. perfect really.. you could spend $$$ on ohlins but YSS alone is a HUGE upgrade over stock.

forks - yes.. that will get pricey. be prepared. exhaust you can keep an eye for used termi's or new staintunes but imo exhaust sits comfortable in 3rd place.

have fun!

some black OZ's from motowheels would look wicked on a black & cream..

(no affiilation, just a satisfied customer)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all, good tips. I agree that wheels and suspension are a great place to start. If I could find a reasonable price on exhaust (like $1k) I might rationalize upping my budget a bit and doing those three. After driving this bone stock for 4 years, I feel like I've gotten my money out of the factory components. :)

Is there a centralized locale on the site that lists vendors who specialize in sport classics?
 

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+ Another for alloy wheels. Braking, handling and suspension all get better with a light wheels swap. Having experienced the change from stock alloy spokers to cast 5-spoke wheels, don't go half way by getting stock alloy spokers. Why Ducati went with shiney over alloy wheels on the GTs is unfathonable.
 

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Freebies first! That is what I have done,

after the 14t sprocket!

1. take the spacers out of the front turn signals, cosmetic you know.
2. open the airbox. You can trim yours to allow a direct airpath to the airfilter for better breathing and a satisfying intake honk under power.
3. open the pipes. There is a discussion on how to do that on this forum including X-rays of the mufflers.

YSS shocks are a decent upgrade that I am glad that one too.

That is where my budget has run out for modding. The rest of my cash is tied up in fuel, tires, etc...
 
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Brake upgrade
Discacciati Built in tank Radial pumps
Save alot on not having to replace or buy new tanks
or Brembo RCS pumps

Discacciati OEM fit billet Calipers
Will fit on OEM wheels
Alpina tubeless spoke wheels
or any aftermarket wheels


Alpina tubeless is a nice change and keeps the classic look


How about the Gauge lowering bracket too?



It's been a several years since I've posted. I've had my GT1000 (black & creme) since summer '08 and love the bike, which is nearly stock (except FatDuc O2 and CRG bar mirrors) and has just shy of 10k miles. I want to make some improvements to make it look and perform better, but I'm suffering from analysis paralysis. In what order would you make mods..highest cost benefit to lowest:

  • Exhaust (thinking Staintunes)
  • Suspension (thinking YSS and Fork kit)
  • Alloy wheels (better handling)
  • Brake upgrade
If I were to do all of the above, I'd be looking north of $5k, I only spent $9.5k on the bike to start with. I'm thinking $2k would be a reasonable start. The other option is to leave it alone and get a second used, more sport oriented bike...the GT will never be a Panigale.

Thanks.
 

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All mods are subjective and depend not just on cost vs value, but how - and why - you ride, plus how much cash you have.

Bang for buck, and for the "average rider" I'd say:

Smaller front sprocket is the best value mod to make your bike pick up better in town or in the twisties, and get more use out of second gear instead of inadvertently going back to first on slow turns.

Most bikes benefit from a freer breathing exhaust, as they are made to pass noise and emmissions tests, which often leave flat spots and bad fuelling at key rpm. It's expensive to sort, but well worth it, whether you go cheaper endcans or expensive full system, plus ECU re-flash (cheap) or full WASP Power-up kit (+bucks).

Next up, handling and power is useless if you can't lay it down on the tarmac. You can be very posh and spend big bucks on Ohlins, or the halfway house - get high spec second hard parts from another Ducati, but if you want to be cheap (and almost as good - honest) fit wilbur springs and heavier fork oil to your existing front tubes, and try to find some second hand OEM alloy wheels and Marzocci rear shocks from someone with a Sport Classic who is spending money on an upgrade, as the SC alloy wheels are nearly as light as the Alpinas, but should be a third of the price - plus, unlike some cast Ducati wheels they slot right in without need for spacers or different brakes. The SC's adjustable rear Marzoccis are quite acceptable, esp if they are set up for your weight.

In terms of cosmetics, my favourite mod is the gauge lowering brackets, as they seem to transform the feel of the bike's instruments, plus they are cheap and easy to fit.

All the rest is great too - if you have either the cash or the passion...
 

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All mods are subjective and depend not just on cost vs value, but how - and why - you ride, plus how much cash you have.
+1

As for how you ride, that should really determine what you're going to upgrade first.

I'd suggest getting rid of the exhaust first. The weightloss alone will be a magnificent difference. Last year I traded out for some tubes from Motocreations, but get tuned if you're thinking of that route.

Then I'd go with the suspension, mostly the rear. Now, this is just from experience and from other GT owners that the stock rears end up compacting.

Have you looked into Carrozzeria wheels? Check them out and give them a whirl, definitely more cost effective than the competition. They're a smaller company that just doesn't get enough good attention.
 

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What does the bike not do that you want it to do?

Most of us are aware of the suspension limitations. Lighter wheels and better suspension setup are two reinforcing aspects of improving that.

Better sound? The Staintunes are a great solution.

Eye candy? There are lots of choices.

Or perhaps it is none of things, but just boredom. Wanting "new" is as natural as wanting "better."

Years ago, when I was serving as editor of DUC, I got the bug to improve my 900SS. Because almost anything I wanted was available for free or nearly so I followed all the then popular and well spoken of paths. Higher compression FbF pistons, opened airbox and free flowing exhaust, lighter flywheel, engine bolts, etc. etc. (See the initial postings here: http://duc-bz.github.com/DUC_Tests_Project900.htm)

All did what others had promised. But here is the catch: In the end the bike was less enjoyable to me than it was stock.

The why of this is subjective. The engine definitely had more performance, but had lost some of its appeal. I compared it at the time with the different feeling that comes with shooting a 9mm in comparison to a .45. One went 'womp,' the other 'crack.'

My advice: Think twice before making any change. Will it satisfy your wants?

I should add that in each case the feeling of "new" and "different" was real. But long-term satisfaction for me went down.

Be aware that few people talk about their own doubts feeling the need, instead, to justify every expense. Others making the suggestions are vendors. Their motivation, while not unrighteous, is in part at least obvious. The may indeed sell what they like but they invariably like (and recommend) what they sell.

Learning from that I have kept my GT almost stock. Fatduc, 14 toother and drilled out cans. Little more.

-don
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What does the bike not do that you want it to do?
… Or perhaps it is none of things, but just boredom. Wanting "new" is as natural as wanting "better."
Great question. I have two primary motives.. performance and aesthetics. When I bought the GT, I was coming from a metric cruiser, I liked the fact that this bike was faster and more nimble. It still had the character of a cruiser, but with some of the DNA of a sport bike. In retrospect it was one of the better purchases I’ve made in my life. When I first got it I rode it like a cruiser. Now I ride it more like a sport bike . I’m starting to notice some of the niggling issues w/ suspension, handling, & power delivery. I love the versatility of this bike, but I’m thinking I’d like to up a performance a notch for those days when I’m not just commuting or cruising to the beach.
The aesthetic improvements are driven by boredom and vanity. I realize that anything I do on this front will become familiar and boring soon enough.
I compared it at the time with the different feeling that comes with shooting a 9mm in comparison to a .45. One went 'womp,' the other 'crack.'
My advice: Think twice before making any change. Will it satisfy your wants?
There is wisdom in what you’re saying. I am personally familiar with the…”I wanna new gun-itis” phenomenon, This is a great analogy for me…to a point. I love the 45-70. There are newer, faster, more accurate, flatter shooting, higher capacity rifles...but in the end my 45-70 lever rifle is still more fun than my match target .308 AR. Trying to turn one into the other is a futile exercise, I spent a lot of money to coming to this realization.

Part of me thinks I should just get a sport bike for those moments when I’m in that mood and just let my GT be a GT…unfortunately that’s the where the rifle analogy ends. It’s logistically much harder for me to own two bikes (insurance cost, maintenance cost & space), which is why I’m really trying to get a two-fer..if that’s even possible. :)
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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Slowdive,

It sounds to me like you have thought this through well and that being the case there is much good advice for you on this thread. Now it is a matter of budget and priorities.

Lighter wheels would be the first place I'd start. (Well, after the fatduc and the 14 tooth sprocket -- those are IMO a given) Then the suspension -- especially the fork or fork innards.

Bling to me is just bling. I do not confab beauty and decoration. The first is far better IMO than the later and a bike either has it or does not.

-don
 

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When I bought my first black SC1000 everybody here liked the way it looked but did not want to ride it.
After we did a few mods to the wheels, brakes, suspension and engine, it became the favorite bike here. (and we have some very trick project bikes here including a new 1199 - all done right)

I just bought a SC 1000S with some nice goodies on it (steering damper/Termis...). It looks beautiful- but again- no one wants to ride it.

It has stock wheels, stock brakes, and an odd riding position..It turns slow, doesn't stop as well as the other bikes.

The PO did a great job making it look good but really did not do that much to enhance the performance because he had a 1098 for fast riding. However it would only take a few tweaks to get this bike to handle well. It won't be as fast as 1098 on the track, but it will do fine in the canyons and everywhere else.

-M
 

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Interesting thread for me as a new owner of a gt '09. Can't address the gt yet but as the owner of 2 vintage nortons that have been modded out I would identify the biggest bang for the buck then do it right, take your time evaluating it, and then take your time again choosing the logical next step. Focus on perfection.

For me, I just got my fat duc and next I have to configure some sort of gear shift lever to accommodate my size 14's and integrate gp shifting

Good luck, rick
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So this is how I decided to spend my '12 moto budget

  • Alpina wheels and new Michelin Power Pures: Given the heavy steel stock wheels and the 5 year old stock tires, I'm banking on this one (needed tires anyway)
  • 14T front sprocket: I'm least sure of this one, worst case I roll back...cheap mod
  • Lower handle bar: For me the stock bars are ~1" too high, and sweep back too much
Exhaust and suspension will have to wait til next year.

BTW, I have a FatDuc O2 tricker gizmo, do any of you adjust this w/ the changing weather? I find that in winter (cold dense air) I run it a bit "leaner" and in hot humid (thin air) I run it richer about an 1/8 of a turn? Pseudo science aside, makes me feel better anyway...

Thanks all for your input, it was valuable. I know sometimes when people solicit opinions on internet forums, they've already made up their minds and are just looking for validation...in this case I really needed some wisdom and I did change course due to some of the fine advise you all have shared.
 

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I prefer lighter wheels. I wanted wheels at least as light as a modern bike.
Spoke wheels are still going to be several pounds heavier each than a high quality forged aluminum wheel.

The first set of wheels I installed on my Sport 1000 was Marchesini forged aluminum wheels. This got rid of the head shake and allowed the bike to handle as well as most modern sport bikes. The bike was totaly transformed.



Looking to save more weight, I installed the BST wheels. This was another huge improvement. Eliminating the steel sprocket, tubes, heavy spoke wheels, and going to lighter rotors, lighter tires, BST wheels, TI drive pins and TI hardware--I saved nearly 30 lbs over the stock set up!



The last set of wheels were the OZ forged aluminum wheels. Weight wise they fall in between the Marchesini and BST but I really liked the looks of the OZ the most.



Get some lighter wheels. You won't regret it.
 
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