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1997 748
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, I converted after an unreal amount of reading posts and articles and watching videos.

I like it...just have to undo about 38 years of muscle memory. Adjustable rearsets came with parts for either option, so...on with the learning curve. Several days of careful, thoughtful riding for the rest of the week so I dont crash or grenade something on a missed shift.

Well, I did have Triumphs and Harleys that shifted on the right, and that never killed me or blew an engine. But this is a different ball game.

So far, so good. Easy to see the mechanical and practical benefit. Sharper shift feel and all the other benefits. Slipper clutch is next. Yeah. Soon. Installed a "cheat sheet" to remind me while re-learning.

1009461
1009462
 

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I see you have a more permanent cheat sheet right above those. :)

Easy to see how losing that linkage makes shifting work smoother and better. (y)
 

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A 3 hour ride should do it. Then for the next 6 months each day ride might have one or two incorrect shifts.. 98% of the time you’ll not even think.
Only issue I have is going out the drive way remembering which bike I’m on.. mine (gp) it The Boss’ std monster. Once I’m going there’s no issue..

Did mine about 20 years ago. Ish..
 

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1997 748
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cool.....I will absolutely report back honestly and objectively.
 

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I switched back and forth between Honda handlebar controls on a VFR and those on an Aprilia V twin for a few years.
Don't know how many times I honk the horn when I meant to turn signal. And whatever errors.
At least they shifted the same.
The Honda had a working rear brake. The Ape was Italian.
 

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I switched for racing purposes in 1993, stopped racing and gradually switched back in 2000 and to this day, sometimes, usually while trolling slowly in dense traffic trying to stay awake, I will shift the wrong way.

The best advice I can give is this: When making an upshift, if you have any doubt AT ALL that you may have shifted the wrong way, do NOT release the clutch. You may free-wheel into a couple of corners but it potentially beats the hell out of the alternative.

If you're not using the clutch, well then may the rods be with you.
 

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I switched mine at one point as well.

I had a 1993 M900 I had bought new, and had thought about switching the shifting many times, but hadn't done it. Then in 2011 I had a lowside, and had to replace the footpeg setups and mufflers. I got Staintunes, and Cycle Cat rearsets, and flipped the shifting.

It did take a while to get used to it, especially since I had been riding that bike for 18 years already. Further complicating things was that my wife had the same bike -- a 1995 M900 -- and kept the standard shift setup. And that's the bike I'm riding now, so I also had to learn to change back.

It did help, though, that I also have older bikes with different shift setups (a 1962 Maico scooter that uses separate upshift and downshift pedals on the floorboard, and a 1964 Vespa and 1960 Heinkel that both use a handgrip twist to shift), so I'm used to shifting not being automatic and always the same.

I did quite like the GP shift arrangement, and may use it in the future.
 

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Years and years ago When I had a Kaw. ZR1 I got the shift linkage from a Honda 6 and it bolted right up to my Zr1 and bingo! GP shifting. I stripped that thing down to the frame and had it reinforced and installed Brembos on the front, I thought I was quite the innovator.
 

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i get a few customer bikes in with race pattern, and they all have the lever way too high, so high i have to stick my knee out to get my toe high enough. often it's because the fairing is in the way.

i don't think i've ever had one that felt like the lever was where it should be. not sure how the owners ride them.

i used to work at a bmw/ducati/mv dealership, and i used to press the start button on f650gs when going for the rh indicator, because all the later r and k bmw had the thumb buttons and my brain must have just thought "bmw". and mv/cagiva had the horn and indicators reversed. it becomes quite subconcious after a little while.
 

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‘05 749R, ‘89 851/926, 749R/999RS project
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In theory (at the track) GP shift makes sense....

.... but Biaggi, Mladin, Schwantz, Walker etc all did more than well enough with standard shift that I didn’t see the point in changing, and the price of one missed shift is just too high.

Not sure why you’d bother on the road.
 

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In theory (at the track) GP shift makes sense....

.... but Biaggi, Mladin, Schwantz, Walker etc all did more than well enough with standard shift that I didn’t see the point in changing, and the price of one missed shift is just too high.

Not sure why you’d bother on the road.
Just switched myself also. The track bike is setup with GP shift so I'd rather keep that and do the same on my street bike so I don't have to switch back and forth every time. Since there's no real downside I can see having GP shift except old habits I might as well just switch it up. Considering I've only been riding for a few years anyway the switch shouldn't be that much of an issue.

Had I been riding for decades and only on streets I agree there's no real point in switching it around. (y)
 

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In the early 1980s I rode a Sportster to/from work every day. On the weekends (between October and April) we went out to the local sand dunes (Imperial Sand Dunes .. aka Buttercup and Glamis) .. we did this every single weekend for about 7 months during cooler weather for about three or four years. Back then, we rode ATCs ... three wheeled ATVs, made by Honda. They used a 4 stroke single with a four speed transmission, all down, and no hand activated clutch. The left hand lever on the bars was actually the rear brake. I had zero trouble switching from the all down/clutchless 4 speed with the left hand rear brake lever of the ATCs and the 1D/3U w/manual clutch w/right foot operated rear brake of the Sportster (it was a 4 speed).

Same when I went from the Yamaha Mini Enduro JT-1 (4 speed, all down) to "grown up bikes" that were 1D/4U. Dunno, can't explain why but I didn't seem to have trouble. Some people can rub their belly and pat their head simultaneously as well, while others cannot. It's just one of those things I reckon.

I used to drive semi truck with a 40 foot trailer loaded with high pressure cylinders of welding and industrial gases. Back then most tractors (aka semi truck) had manual 13 or 16 speed transmissions, we had one semi with a 13 speed and one with a 16 speed. Our "bobtail" truck had a 4 speed stick with a 3 position "splitter switch" on the knob which selected rear end end gear ratios. I drove a 4 speed manual in my pickup truck to and from work, or the Harley while driving any number of vehicles at work each day.

I'm not bragging, I think some of the anxiety people feel about GP shift is more about ruminating than it is about how well/poor they'll actually handle GP shift.

When I bought my used '96CR Ducati the seller had the bike set up with GP shift. Since it's my only motorsport toy (nothing on hand with some other shift pattern) I may just leave it that way when I finish preparing it for safe/reliable riding. We'll see. It's so easy to switch back and forth between std and GP it's not like some super hassle to change one way or the other, at least not on an SS/CR model. I think it's just a matter of carrying a 10mm combination wrench with you while riding (?)..

I'll add that Member @ducvet offered a solid reminder regarding any question in one's mind about what gear they're actually in before releasing the clutch lever ... wise advise!

:)
 

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I switched my SS to GP shift in 2003.
My Corse is also GP shift.
I am so used to it, I have to think hard on another bike.

Too old to relearn it.
It's mine, and no one will ride it but me.
 

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I was instructing at the track yesterday and had a woman student on her second day on the track with a new to her EX500 track bike. Her main ride for the last 20 years has been a 1960's triumph with right side shifting , she had some leaning curve to get used to this weird left side shifting. By the end of the day she was getting the hang of it and was starting to pick up the pace just fine. This Saturday she is doing her Rookie race and will be vintage racing the ex500 for the first time. Some riders were probably wondering "why is she so slow?" at first but I think It would have been fun to swap them to right side shift and send them out on a completely different bike on a track they have never seen.

I switch to Gp shift on my 851 back in 1993 because I was trying to fix a rider issue I was having, with my toes under the shifter to grab that upshift out of the corner I would catch my toe on the pavement at lean and suck my foot off the peg. All I needed was to get the ball of my inside foot up on the peg and do the movement under the pedal later but instead I switched by flipping the arm. after a few stupid moments of trying to leave a stop light in 6th gear I finally got it.

I believe you are much safer converting TO Gp than FROM Gp because most of the time the mistake you make going to gp is upshift which simply makes you slower. Coming FROM Gp you mistakenly do a downshift and that tests those clutch hand reflexes if you do not have a slipper clutch.

i agree with Belter in that I often see shifters of all types adjusted incorrectly, if I have to lift my foot off the peg to get on top of the shifter it simply is not right with any shifter. Many shifting issues I find are simple alignment problems.

As of now I have Gp on my track bikes and a coouple street bikes and other street bikes are not Gp. given my trade i have to be able to ride them all but so far the worst shifting I deal with are feet forward cruisers. My perfect arrangement would be a 8 speed gearbox on a small motor with Gp shifting, now you see why no smart person would listen to me.
 

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1997 748
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Great responses, thanks for all the opinions and observations.

It's not presenting a problem for me, going fine. I'm sold. I started thinking of it like riding a horse: up and back is slow/stop. Silly, but it works for me.

As said above, I am also odd about lever/peg position. I got the most adjustable rearsets I could find and am still tinkering for that "perfect" setup, I will likely trim the fairing for clearance.

I do plan on installing a slipper for a number of reasons, I like how this project is coming together.

If you are thinking about it, give it a try. Just be conscious of what you are doing (as you should be on a bike! LOL)
 

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I switched all my race bikes to GP shift but I put it on the right side. Started riding/racing on a Norton then got a 750 Duc GT, didn't trust myself with left shift, had to think about it too much.
 
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