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Discussion Starter #1
Unfortunately I went to put them on and realized I was woefully under-prepared for the amount of work involved. I assumed it was just taking the fairings off and replacing the ducts. Little did I know I had to take the seat and gas tank off to get access to the air box so as to undo the clips holding the ducts in place. That was an unpleasant little surprise.

Anyone got any tips on how to avoid doing all that? The tank in particular is what I'd like to avoid as I looked into it and it seems like a recipe for disaster if you don't have experience given the age of the connections gaskets etc.

The parts I ordered were really very nice though, top notch quality & service. PM me if you want to know where I got them, not sure if I'm allowed to mention the source (every forum has different rules about that kind of thing).
 

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Not really. Removing the body work and tank are pretty routine items.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You guys must be pros. I know there's nothing really that difficult about it, but it's not really like flicking on a light switch either. It is a bit hard to get your hand under the tank to undo the connections etc. I took the seat off previously for something unrelated and it was a real PITA trying to get it back on because of the spring-loaded mount. Maybe I need a second pair of hands or you guys know something I don't.
 

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Not a pro~ Just another home hack. It just a little takes practice, I guess. These are about the easiest bikes to strip down I have ever worked on. Two pins, one bolt and two QD fuel connectors and you're there. You want a challenge? Pull the body work off a Ducati ST series!

BTW, if you're going to pull the tank, it's a good idea to have a small handful of those QD fitting o-rings on hand and maybe a little silicon grease to help reassemble. I smear a slight film of grease on the air box gasket too. Much easier.
 

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You guys must be pros. I know there's nothing really that difficult about it, but it's not really like flicking on a light switch either. It is a bit hard to get your hand under the tank to undo the connections etc. I took the seat off previously for something unrelated and it was a real PITA trying to get it back on because of the spring-loaded mount. Maybe I need a second pair of hands or you guys know something I don't.
I have a bar stool that is the right height to rest the tank on while it is all plugged in, if needed (like tuning the throttle bodies, for example). Try to use a stool or something if you have one and really don't want to remove the tank.

Usually I remove it, usually takes a couple of minutes. Fairly easy to un-clip with the quick-release fittings mine has. Not sure if all bikes have them as I have only worked on mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the tips guys. Need to get those extras and give it a whirl I guess.
 

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Dont be afraid of this one, it is pretty simplistic. But a few hints cannot hurt. It is clearly easiest if there is less fuel in the tank. If u are using a front wheel holding style stand remove the mirrors first then put the bike in the stand. If using a rear stand disregard the last sentence. If using just the bikes side stand, then I really recommend getting the tank contents to a minimum as a heavy tank unbolted can fall from the bike and will damage bits. The mirror bolts are a PITA if you cannot move the bars out of the way. Get the right bit for the mirror bolts as they are really soft and strip easy, these are designed to break to protect the fairing supports in a crash. After removing the side fairings, the mirrors and the nose fairing, disconnect the turn signal connectors. Remove the bolt at the rear of the tank. I lift the tank and pull it back to free it from the front attachment point, then place a block of wood under the tank to support the tank. You can just turn the tank sideways to get to the plumbing but this will more than likely chip the paint on your airbox. once the tank is elevated a bit, 2.5 inches for a wood block, you can get your fingers safely to the wire harness connector without your fingers getting squished, separate this wiring connector then on to the quick disconnects. YOu have to press and hold the slide clip in to release the fitting. Hard to see the fittings but use your fingers to feel where they are. The challenge is to pull straight down on the connector not on the hose. Pulling on the hose will lever it out, damage the seal ring and may break either end of the plastic fitting. Once separated the tank is free. Having done this once you can do it probably do it without the block of wood and pretty quickly. Release the inner airbox clips and the air runners will fall off the bike. Support or hold them to prevent damage. The Airbox seals will also fall out if the bike is on its side stand. Keep these for reuse. If your new runners came with filters great if not you may have to remove your factory filters by removing the little screws that hold the two halves of each runner together. Replace the air filters and install the runners. If your air runners dont have filters consider one of the in box filters, BCM, pipercross etc. follow the steps backwards and you are in. Before reconnecting the fuel lines, Check the male portion of the quick connect fittings to see if you can identify any defects in the seal rings. if damaged replace em. I pretty much replace them every time I do a service just to keep em good. A quick search of this site should give you part numbers from Mc Master Carr. I get em by the 50's and always carry some in the tool kit. If one of the seals for the quick disconnects is damaged when you reconnect them they will leak. One of the lines is a feed from the pump to the injectors and the other is return line. The return may not leak until pressurized so check the fittings after priming the system. Do this by lifting the rear of the tank and feel for leaking fuel. I believe it is fun working on my own bikes and hope this helps. Best wishes Brad.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Brad, that was a wealth of helpful info!

If stock aren't the air filters in the air box and not in the air ducts? I thought the stock air ducts only contained the reduction plates (for lack of a better term) to reduce intake noise.
 

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grand poobah
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Glad I could help. The 916 and 748 had the in air runner filters. I know some of the 996's and all the 998's came with the air restrictions but as far as I know all of that era of bikes should still have the filters in the stock runners. A quick check ducati Omaha's part fiche for specifics shows the 2003 998 has the in air runner filters. here is the link Ducati Omaha - Ducati OEM Parts Ordering System - Parts Fiche - Ducati Parts Put the web site in your favorites, I reference it a lot. That web site is a great resource for exploded views of the bikes part assemblies. They have prices listed up front and are quick at shipping. I support them when I can, i have no connection to them other than liking the web site and parts sales service. Best Wishes Brad.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again. I love that site, I have ordered numerous odds & ends through them already.
 

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You can just turn the tank sideways to get to the plumbing but this will more than likely chip the paint on your airbox. Best wishes Brad.
Nice writeup! As to not harming the paint, this is how I do it. Lift the back of the tank, place 2 shop rags across the painted sections of the airbox. Turn the tank sideways, and rest on the rags.
 

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...I lift the tank and pull it back to free it from the front attachment point, then place a block of wood under the tank to support the tank. You can just turn the tank sideways to get to the plumbing but this will more than likely chip the paint on your airbox. once the tank is elevated a bit, 2.5 inches for a wood block, you can get your fingers safely to the wire harness connector without your fingers getting squished, separate this wiring connector then on to the quick disconnects. YOu have to press and hold the slide clip in to release the fitting. Hard to see the fittings but use your fingers to feel where they are...
Great tips! I use this exact same technique. By the way, the quick disconnects on the R are stainless... I have heard that the other bikes use plastic fittings which are not the strongest things in the world. As long as the tank is off, you may want to get yourself a couple of stainless fittings and replace the OEM ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Another follow up question on this guys, what's the consensus on whether or not I need to do a tune with the new air runner's and a new over-injector air filter setup as opposed to stock?

I'm sure it would be beneficial, but is it actually necessary?
 

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How does the bike feel compared to before with OEM stuff?

For me, going from OEM tubes with in-tube filters to carbon tubes with no filter and a JHP big hunk of foam had an effect I did not like. It made the throttle feel pretty soft compared to where it was. I have no idea at all if it made less overall power. I'd say probably not. Power wise, it felt the same using the ever-accurate butt dyno. Just softer throttle. Maybe caused by a slight over-rich condition the instant the throttle opened sharply due to a bit less reserve air being available, at least for a short moment? That's my way of thinking about it. Throttle response for this bike had always been very crisp and the big filter changed that. Could it be tuned out? I believe so, many here who know much better than I do say it can be. I decided to go a different route, however. I found a set of the BMC filters that mount to the sides of the air box rather than over the throttles. Instant change (return) in response, maybe better than it was before. Happy for now, although I am certain I could also benefit from a custom tune. Most of us could!

So the sort answer is yes, it should be tuned. Will it blow up if you don't have it tuned? I doubt it. The real answer is that any time you change something on the bike from intake to exhaust and anything in between, it probably should be tuned... Up to you in the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I haven't installed the tubes/filter setup yet. I'm just trying to figure out if it's going to be necessary to flash the ECU, in which case I might just try to do it all at once.

Going off Shazam's post from years ago that JEC re-posted, I can see how the big foam would change throttle response dramatically which I would like to avoid.
 

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I haven't seen a power increase with bigger tubes on a 998. If its restrictions you're worried about then the air entry on the fairing is the greatest, not the tube.
 

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All great advice here from some very experienced folks.
+1 on the stainless QR line fittings. The 916/996/998 series is one of the all time easiest bikes to strip down for service,
Bodywork/seat/tank comes off soooo easy. You'll find yourself doing more service on it precisely because everything is accessible.
 
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