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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have experience with getting a motorcycle up and down a few steps? I thought about a ramp but most are thin, and I'm nervous about the top lifting up or shifting and falling. I'm not sure how to support it.
977163
 

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Personally, I'd just go to Home Depot or wherever and get some 3/4" plywood and cut to width. Make it wide enough that if you have to stop or put your feet down...or even push it up the ramp that you have room to do so.

Get a pair of 2x4 or 2x6 lengths and cut the stair treads out. Place on each side of the stairs and screw the ramp down to the them so there is support and the plywood won't flex much. Maybe put another length across the width to support it in the middle where the middle step will allow it. It will be plenty sturdy enough for any Ducati, short of one loaded with hard luggage like an ST or a Multi.

If you're worried about it being slippery or anything like that, just get some grip tape from a skateboard shop or online and put strips across the width every so many inches from the bottom to the top. One caveat...make it long enough to mitigate the closure between the lowest point of the bike and the top of the ramp once the front wheel goes over the top.

I've done this to get bikes in and out of my living room when needed. Yes. My living room. Mine aren't fancy and simply allow me to push the bike up to my entryway from my living room and then just ride it (engine off) down from the front door to my stoop and from the stoop down to the front walk in one smooth path. It works the same in reverse...only I use the engine up to the front door. ....sean
 

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I have a small concrete patio with a few steps at my front door. It's very similar to what you have at your house. My front door isn't that wide either. I put my SFS inside every winter. I got an aluminum folding motorcycle ramp from Cycle Gear on sale at a grand opening many years ago. It's the type of ramp that's slightly curved. I got a couple pieces of 3" wide trim to cover the ladder rails that the tires run over. Now there's no bumps or extra resistance to fight with while pushing my bike up the ramp. I can put the bike inside without any help. I just have to be very careful because it's a tight fit. But I'm used to it now.


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Use two motorcyle ramps and if possible two people 1 ramp for the bike one for the people to walk on.
The longer the better.
Tie or block the ramps to stop them from slipping.

Red hot tip.

Put the bike in gear and use the clutch/gearbox to stop the bike.

If it becomes difficult or you need to change your grip when moving the bike at least if you release the clutch the bike stops also more weight on the back wheel = more grip.

I think slipper clutches can make it a little different.

Using the front brake is for amateurs but always funny to watch.



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I use one of those pads that you kneel on for gardening to keep the ramp from sliding or moving . I put the pad at the lowest part of the ramp on my sidewalk. I line the bike up with my ramp. Make a running start and focus on my door opening Once the front tire passes the opening I have to stop and carefully stop to clear the bars and push the bike up through the door. I'm used to loading bikes onto a trailer at my old job so I'm used to doing this.


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Discussion Starter #12
I'm thinking of the slightly bent ramp approach. Smart advice on using the clutch as a brake, instead of the... brake. Thanks all!
 

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... or just screw a 2x4 under the ramp where the 2x4 can ~hook~ on the the second step. This whole ramp thing can be done with scarcely more than scrap wood, there's really no need to spend money on trick ramps or special edge lips or whatever. Really, it can be done!

I built a ramp out of three 2x6 lengths (about eight feet long) with 2x6 cross members. The ones on each end are mounted in different distances from the ends of the 18 inch wide ramp, to deal with different situations. When I bought my '96 900CR six months ago, we pushed the bike up the ramp (which was leaned on the tail gate of my truck) until the front wheel rolled over the top edge of the ramp. I then lifted the ramp with the bike on it by myself ... fuddup neck and all .. until the ramp was level, then my brother (who was at the ready in the bed of the truck, working the front brake lever) took the bike and rolled it off of the ramp and into the bed. Since the ramp was essentially a 2nd Class Lever, I was not lifting the dead weight of the bike, actually a good bit less than that. Unloading it when we got home, we pushed the rear wheel on to the ramp (which was not being lifted up .. it was just at an angle from the tail gate to the driveway) until the pipes stopped against the top of the ramp as the rear wheel rolled lower than the front wheel. My brother lifted the front wheel up high enough so the pipes cleared the edge of the ramp while I worked the rear brake pedal with my hand, as I stood on the driveway. Once everything made it over the top edge of the ramp, we just slowly rolled the bike down the ramp with me working the rear brake lever by hand as I stood in the driveway and my brother steered the front wheel from the top of the ramp. Easy peasy ... in the truck, and out of the truck.

My point is that special/costly stuff isn't required. Just use lumber/plywood and wood screws. Don't glue it together along with the screws .. just use the screws. That way if for some reason you need to reconfigure the wooden construct it's very easily done. Take it apart and screw it back together in whatever configuration is needed.

Or rev the piss out of it, dump the clutch, and wheelie that bitch off the steps!!!!

:LOL:




... kidding of course ...

Pic of a 2nd class lever ... Me = force ...... Bike = load ...... Edge of pickup tail gate = fulcrum.


977250





This is the ramp I built (it's flipped over, upside down). Pic taken in 2011 when we picked up a 1984 Honda V45 Magna project bike in Lake Havasu City (I coverted it into a 1980s racing Superbike themed street bike). That bike outweighs the '96 900CR I bought six months ago by a solid 150 pounds ... and yet the ramp worked just fine. Same ramp I used to pick up the 900CR six months ago. It's just 2x6s all screwed together, easily reconfigurable, plenty long enough, and plenty strong enough ... it's lasted nearly ten years now!
977251
 

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Does anyone have experience with getting a motorcycle up and down a few steps? I thought about a ramp but most are thin, and I'm nervous about the top lifting up or shifting and falling. I'm not sure how to support it. View attachment 977163
... or just screw a 2x4 under the ramp where the 2x4 can ~hook~ on the the second step. This whole ramp thing can be done with scarcely more than scrap wood, there's really no need to spend money on trick ramps or special edge lips or whatever. Really, it can be done!

I built a ramp out of three 2x6 lengths (about eight feet long) with 2x6 cross members. The ones on each end are mounted in different distances from the ends of the 18 inch wide ramp, to deal with different situations. When I bought my '96 900CR six months ago, we pushed the bike up the ramp (which was leaned on the tail gate of my truck) until the front wheel rolled over the top edge of the ramp. I then lifted the ramp with the bike on it by myself ... fuddup neck and all .. until the ramp was level, then my brother (who was at the ready in the bed of the truck, working the front brake lever) took the bike and rolled it off of the ramp and into the bed. Since the ramp was essentially a 2nd Class Lever, I was not lifting the dead weight of the bike, actually a good bit less than that. Unloading it when we got home, we pushed the rear wheel on to the ramp (which was not being lifted up .. it was just at an angle from the tail gate to the driveway) until the pipes stopped against the top of the ramp as the rear wheel rolled lower than the front wheel. My brother lifted the front wheel up high enough so the pipes cleared the edge of the ramp while I worked the rear brake pedal with my hand, as I stood on the driveway. Once everything made it over the top edge of the ramp, we just slowly rolled the bike down the ramp with me working the rear brake lever by hand as I stood in the driveway and my brother steered the front wheel from the top of the ramp. Easy peasy ... in the truck, and out of the truck.

My point is that special/costly stuff isn't required. Just use lumber/plywood and wood screws. Don't glue it together along with the screws .. just use the screws. That way if for some reason you need to reconfigure the wooden construct it's very easily done. Take it apart and screw it back together in whatever configuration is needed.

Or rev the piss out of it, dump the clutch, and wheelie that bitch off the steps!!!!

:LOL:




... kidding of course ...

Pic of a 2nd class lever ... Me = force ...... Bike = load ...... Edge of pickup tail gate = fulcrum.


View attachment 977250




This is the ramp I built (it's flipped over, upside down). Pic taken in 2011 when we picked up a 1984 Honda V45 Magna project bike in Lake Havasu City (I coverted it into a 1980s racing Superbike themed street bike). That bike outweighs the '96 900CR I bought six months ago by a solid 150 pounds ... and yet the ramp worked just fine. Same ramp I used to pick up the 900CR six months ago. It's just 2x6s all screwed together, easily reconfigurable, plenty long enough, and plenty strong enough ... it's lasted nearly ten years now!
View attachment 977251
... or just screw a 2x4 under the ramp where the 2x4 can ~hook~ on the the second step. This whole ramp thing can be done with scarcely more than scrap wood, there's really no need to spend money on trick ramps or special edge lips or whatever. Really, it can be done!

I built a ramp out of three 2x6 lengths (about eight feet long) with 2x6 cross members. The ones on each end are mounted in different distances from the ends of the 18 inch wide ramp, to deal with different situations. When I bought my '96 900CR six months ago, we pushed the bike up the ramp (which was leaned on the tail gate of my truck) until the front wheel rolled over the top edge of the ramp. I then lifted the ramp with the bike on it by myself ... fuddup neck and all .. until the ramp was level, then my brother (who was at the ready in the bed of the truck, working the front brake lever) took the bike and rolled it off of the ramp and into the bed. Since the ramp was essentially a 2nd Class Lever, I was not lifting the dead weight of the bike, actually a good bit less than that. Unloading it when we got home, we pushed the rear wheel on to the ramp (which was not being lifted up .. it was just at an angle from the tail gate to the driveway) until the pipes stopped against the top of the ramp as the rear wheel rolled lower than the front wheel. My brother lifted the front wheel up high enough so the pipes cleared the edge of the ramp while I worked the rear brake pedal with my hand, as I stood on the driveway. Once everything made it over the top edge of the ramp, we just slowly rolled the bike down the ramp with me working the rear brake lever by hand as I stood in the driveway and my brother steered the front wheel from the top of the ramp. Easy peasy ... in the truck, and out of the truck.

My point is that special/costly stuff isn't required. Just use lumber/plywood and wood screws. Don't glue it together along with the screws .. just use the screws. That way if for some reason you need to reconfigure the wooden construct it's very easily done. Take it apart and screw it back together in whatever configuration is needed.

Or rev the piss out of it, dump the clutch, and wheelie that bitch off the steps!!!!

:LOL:




... kidding of course ...

Pic of a 2nd class lever ... Me = force ...... Bike = load ...... Edge of pickup tail gate = fulcrum.


View attachment 977250




This is the ramp I built (it's flipped over, upside down). Pic taken in 2011 when we picked up a 1984 Honda V45 Magna project bike in Lake Havasu City (I coverted it into a 1980s racing Superbike themed street bike). That bike outweighs the '96 900CR I bought six months ago by a solid 150 pounds ... and yet the ramp worked just fine. Same ramp I used to pick up the 900CR six months ago. It's just 2x6s all screwed together, easily reconfigurable, plenty long enough, and plenty strong enough ... it's lasted nearly ten years now!
View attachment 977251
Does anyone have experience with getting a motorcycle up and down a few steps? I thought about a ramp but most are thin, and I'm nervous about the top lifting up or shifting and falling. I'm not sure how to support it. View attachment 977163
your answer is in the photo..put sandbags on the steps or lengths of 4x4s
 

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My bikes live in the family room during the long Chicago winters. It's 6 steps up to my back deck and that is about two more steps than I can comfortably push the bikes up by myself. I tried using an 8 foot plywood ramp but the bikes would high center at the top. I bought a 9' curved aluminum ramp ($80) to fix that problem. You will need the curve if the climb is steep like it is if you're going up 4 steps or more. I bought an AC powered winch that I bolt to the deck, plug it into the convenient AC outlet on the deck and hook the cable to the front forks with soft ties. My (very understanding) wife runs the winch and it easily pulls the bikes up while I steer the bikes and keep them balanced. Since the OP has only three steps up it should be an easy job to push the bike up a ramp especially if he has a helper.
Or as Rex says...Rev 'er up and bang it up the steps!
 

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