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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got the MTS back from dealer after the 600 mi service and was told by the shop guy to ring the piss out of it to continue to break in the engine, so I followed instructions. Coming out of a turn on to the freeway I revved up in first to about 7K rpm, upshifted to second and cracked the throttle and the nose came right up (touring mode, 150 hp, low engine setting). I knew the bike was powerful, but I was surprised at how easy the front came up. A bit later I was cruising the highway at about 75 mph and thought I'd shake the handlebars left/right gently to see how the bike handled and was surprised at how easily the front end shook. Kinda scary to think what might happen if I hit a pot hole at speed or have something tweak the front end and get a tank slapper - has me wondering if I could get it back under control in time before it bucked me off.

I've had a 10 yr hiatus from riding before the MTS, and my last bike was a '91 CBR1000, which was REALLY nose-heavy. Is it just me, or is the MTS remarkably light on the front? Anyone have any problems or "oh sh*t" moments because of the front end? Curious to know if there is anything I need to be careful about and/or tips for keeping the front end planted.
 

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Although the front end responds under very light pressure, it has never given me any concern when powering through twisties or whipping down the highway with wind and bumps and unconscious cagers all around me. The bike is light and powerful which equals rapid response to rider inputs. However, she rides like she is on rails and goes where she is pointed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Although the front end responds under very light pressure, it has never given me any concern when powering through twisties or whipping down the highway with wind and bumps and unconscious cagers all around me. The bike is light and powerful which equals rapid response to rider inputs. However, she rides like she is on rails and goes where she is pointed.
Thanks for the comment. It may just be an issue of getting familiar with this bike - only have about 630 miles on it so far. LOVE IT. Just gotta be careful and take the time to learn it before getting too wrapped up in the throttle. Back when I was last riding years ago steering dampeners were all the rage, however as I get back into the hobby I don't see any. I would think the MTS might be a prime candidate for one with such a light front end?

Been a while since I was last in Redmond. I think there is a restaurant there either with a Ducati theme, or at least with an old Ducati or two in it. . .am I remembering correctly?
 

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I found mine to be a bit light in the front to the point that was a bit of a concern so I tweaked a bit the suspension and slid the forks up the triple about 8-10mm, now the bike is as planted as my streetfighter is IMHO.
 

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Lucifuhr, I was up in your backyard yesterday riding round and slabbed it back 100 miles this morning. Down 101, city, 280, 75mph most of the way with only one hand on the bars most of the way. Bike is dead solid stable at speed over everything the road throws at you. The reason you can unsettle it so easy as you describe is because of the leverage afforded by those wide, flat bars.
 

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Ohlins or Scott makes a damper for this bike, the mounting though, carries a steep price tag if I recall, it's from a company in Italy I believe Lusuardi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lucifuhr, I was up in your backyard yesterday riding round and slabbed it back 100 miles this morning. Down 101, city, 280, 75mph most of the way with only one hand on the bars most of the way. Bike is dead solid stable at speed over everything the road throws at you. The reason you can unsettle it so easy as you describe is because of the leverage afforded by those wide, flat bars.
Ahhhh, good point I had not considered - the leverage afforded the wide bars. Plus, my last bike was 100 lbs heavier than the MTS, so I may also need to acclimate on that front as well.

Where did you ride yesterday? I thought about riding myself but had too many chores that have slid since getting the bike that I had to shelve the impulse to maintain marital harmony. Perhaps I'll see you up this way again soon?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I found mine to be a bit light in the front to the point that was a bit of a concern so I tweaked a bit the suspension and slid the forks up the triple about 8-10mm, now the bike is as planted as my streetfighter is IMHO.
Ahhhh, great tip here, thanks! What kinds of tweaking did you do to the suspension? For sliding the forks I assume just a simple matter of loosening up the triple clamp and sliding them up?
 

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Yes, The MTS1200 is a beast. Picks up the fromnt wheel in 3rd through a sweeper if you give it the berries.

A bit later I was cruising the highway at about 75 mph and thought I'd shake the handlebars left/right gently to see how the bike handled
There is a simple and no cost fix for this. Don't do it. Seriously.

Any bike that handles will will have responsive steering. I have hit many potholes and even had a truck drop a 2x2 beam in front of me that I could not avoid and the bike just rode over it. No twitch, no shake. Destroyed the front wheel but the bike handles well and has just the right level of directional stability IMHO.

Shaking the handlebars is not the same as hitting road wrinkles.
 

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Thanks for the comment. It may just be an issue of getting familiar with this bike - only have about 630 miles on it so far. LOVE IT. Just gotta be careful and take the time to learn it before getting too wrapped up in the throttle. Back when I was last riding years ago steering dampeners were all the rage, however as I get back into the hobby I don't see any. I would think the MTS might be a prime candidate for one with such a light front end?

Been a while since I was last in Redmond. I think there is a restaurant there either with a Ducati theme, or at least with an old Ducati or two in it. . .am I remembering correctly?
You may be thinking of Cafe Veloce in Totem Lake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes, The MTS1200 is a beast. Picks up the fromnt wheel in 3rd through a sweeper if you give it the berries.



There is a simple and no cost fix for this. Don't do it. Seriously.

Any bike that handles will will have responsive steering. I have hit many potholes and even had a truck drop a 2x2 beam in front of me that I could not avoid and the bike just rode over it. No twitch, no shake. Destroyed the front wheel but the bike handles well and has just the right level of directional stability IMHO.

Shaking the handlebars is not the same as hitting road wrinkles.
Good feedback, Tim. Pleased to see comments from those who have had disruptions to the suspension and didn't have problems with the light front end.
 

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The name of the restaurant sounds about right, but I don't recognize the name Totem Lake. I was in Redmond for a client visit and the client drove when we went to lunch. I presume it's close to Redmond?
It is between Redmond and Kirkland. One of the motorcycle clubs has a dinner meeting there on the third Wednesday of each month. Decent food, biker friendly, and reasonably priced. If you come to the area again let me know and maybe we can meet there for lunch.
 

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Just got the MTS back from dealer after the 600 mi service and was told by the shop guy to ring the piss out of it to continue to break in the engine, so I followed instructions. Coming out of a turn on to the freeway I revved up in first to about 7K rpm, upshifted to second and cracked the throttle and the nose came right up (touring mode, 150 hp, low engine setting). I knew the bike was powerful, but I was surprised at how easy the front came up. A bit later I was cruising the highway at about 75 mph and thought I'd shake the handlebars left/right gently to see how the bike handled and was surprised at how easily the front end shook. Kinda scary to think what might happen if I hit a pot hole at speed or have something tweak the front end and get a tank slapper - has me wondering if I could get it back under control in time before it bucked me off.

I've had a 10 yr hiatus from riding before the MTS, and my last bike was a '91 CBR1000, which was REALLY nose-heavy. Is it just me, or is the MTS remarkably light on the front? Anyone have any problems or "oh sh*t" moments because of the front end? Curious to know if there is anything I need to be careful about and/or tips for keeping the front end planted.
If you weigh more than, oh, say 180lbs, the rear spring isn't really right for you. For now, since it's new, crank in some pre-load to keep the arse end from squatting excessively under load (i.e. whacking the throttle open). Once the suspension settles in, you may need a heavier spring in the back.

The MTS is a finely tuned carving machine, and poorly setup suspension for the weight on it's back, or even poorly inflated tires, has a dramatic impact on handling. Set her up right and she's on rails. :cool:

-SM
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you weigh more than, oh, say 180lbs, the rear spring isn't really right for you. For now, since it's new, crank in some pre-load to keep the arse end from squatting excessively under load (i.e. whacking the throttle open). Once the suspension settles in, you may need a heavier spring in the back.

The MTS is a finely tuned carving machine, and poorly setup suspension for the weight on it's back, or even poorly inflated tires, has a dramatic impact on handling. Set her up right and she's on rails. :cool:

-SM
Thanks for the comments. I have noted that many have posted up about changing the springs fore and aft, however I had not given it much thought. I'm clocking in around 205, so maybe jacking up the preload on the rear is something I need to fiddle with a bit.
 

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If you weigh more than, oh, say 180lbs, the rear spring isn't really right for you. For now, since it's new, crank in some pre-load to keep the arse end from squatting excessively under load (i.e. whacking the throttle open). Once the suspension settles in, you may need a heavier spring in the back.

The MTS is a finely tuned carving machine, and poorly setup suspension for the weight on it's back, or even poorly inflated tires, has a dramatic impact on handling. Set her up right and she's on rails. :cool:

-SM
Funny thing. This weekend was the first time I loaded up all three cases and took a long ride with the bike. Set it on Touring mode, two up with luggage. total weight of the three bags loaded was only about 65 pounds. Tire pressures 35R/34F. I weigh 175 without gear.

When I got on the bike and wheeled it out, I couldn't believe how much I felt the weight. More so even than when I put my 95lb son on the back. Really felt undersprung and strange cornering. First hour in the mountains felt really weird and I felt like a mess on the road.

Then, for some strange reason, it all started feeling good. Bike was turning in great, suspension felt great, bike was sticking, everything felt great. Took it down a pretty goaty road at a good clip fully loaded down and I was amazed at how well it performed. Had a blast riding all afternoon like that.

I can't reconcile how the first hour of riding and the last four were the same bike. Next day, bike was still great, suspension worked fine still loaded up. I think it was just a matter of me adjusting to the additional weight.
 

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Thanks for the comments. I have noted that many have posted up about changing the springs fore and aft, however I had not given it much thought. I'm clocking in around 205, so maybe jacking up the preload on the rear is something I need to fiddle with a bit.
given your weight, and what i know, heed Sock's advice and go with the stiffer springs. one of my friends just did (same weight +/-) and it transformed the handling in his opinion, he's been riding for over 35yrs.
 

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I found mine to be a bit light in the front to the point that was a bit of a concern so I tweaked a bit the suspension and slid the forks up the triple about 8-10mm, now the bike is as planted as my streetfighter is IMHO.
+1... Just this weekend I dropped my forks 8mm and took it to the mountains. The result was improved feeling, so dropping the forks was better. However, in my opinion, this bike still does not feel as planted as say my Fireblade. Other than way too much dive for my liking, (I know, needs stiffer springs) It doesn't do anything stupid, it just feels a little too vauge when pushed hard.:think:

I guess I need to get off my arse and get the Andreani Group cartridges/springs and add the manual Ohlins shock.:( Ouch!
 

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If you weigh more than, oh, say 180lbs, the rear spring isn't really right for you. For now, since it's new, crank in some pre-load to keep the arse end from squatting excessively under load (i.e. whacking the throttle open). Once the suspension settles in, you may need a heavier spring in the back.

The MTS is a finely tuned carving machine, and poorly setup suspension for the weight on it's back, or even poorly inflated tires, has a dramatic impact on handling. Set her up right and she's on rails. :cool:

-SM
Pete

Always nice to read your posts.

I might be riding a Multi designed on the drawing board and at the factory for the following scenario.

1. Rider weighs 160 lbs (or even... less).
2. Never carries any baggage.
3. Never rides two up.

I know the bike was purposely designed for a gazillion other riding conditions: but adjustments should really be made to the bike to accurately accommodate them...and to assure that the bike behaves as if you are riding it under the three original conditions above.

After following as many threads as possible here since 08/10 I may be wrong but my memory is that most Multi owners here: do not fit the original designed "Ducati Multistrada temp plate".

Guys!!.....You do "not look fat in those jeans". I swear!

Just tweak the suspension adjustments.

Dan
 
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