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Hi all, sorry if anyone has posted this before... but I've noticed scratch/wear marks on the paint where my knees rub on the gas tank.
I know some use 3M tape, but was wondering if anyone knew of some cooler options. I saw a crotch rocket the other day with what looked like knee grip tape attached/stuck on in that area and it looked pretty cool, but was obviously specifically made for this function. Would be cool to have some sort of carbon fiber sticker/protector to put there for paint protection/aesthetics. Did a Google search and didn't really find anything, but maybe someone knows.
thanks
b
 

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You're gonna love my nuts...
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For now (I think, last did a search a few weeks ago) you're stuck with either the Ducati carbon tank protectors, or a universal fit one.

TankSlapper does not list one for the Multi 1200 yet.
 

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well at least they look cool... thanks
and after all it's fashion not function... or if your lucky both
+1 :D

I've been watching that area pretty closely since I got the bike to see if I should place the DP protectors. So far, no marks but I'm still keeping an eye and if/when the area starts to get marked up - on they go!
 

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I haven't even washed my bike yet to look. I don't think I want to...
 

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The clear ones blend in really well, nice fit and hard to see they are on. Not sure why you would pick the carbon-look-a-like one. It's more expensive, and it's not carbon, so it's not lighter. :) Mine got scratches really bad the first 600 miles, but when you put the clear on, it acts like a clear-coat, and the scratches disapear.

The other solution would be venture shield, but does it keep scratches off from heavy knee-rubbing?
 

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I also got the DP clear tank protectors and they look great on my white touring. I got the clear ones because I was worried that the faux carbon ones would chop up the nice lines of the bike below the tank. I'm glad I went with the clear because they're virtually invisible from a few feet away.

Some tips on applying these tank protectors (especially the clear ones where you don't want air bubbles and finger prints showing through):

What you'll need:

a). a new set of DP tank protectors;
b). a clean, empty spritzer bottle;
c). clear tap water and a few drops of liquid dish soap like Dawn liquid;
d). some rubbing alcohol;
e). blow dryer or heat gun;
f). an old plastic credit card or plastic freezer defrosting tool with smooth edges, to use as a squeegee;
g). a clean, dry microfiber hand towel;
h). half an hour of time and some patience.

Now, let's get started:

1). get a clean spritzer bottle and fill with clean water; add a few drops of liquid dishwater soap like Dawn liquid, and gently shake the bottle to mix up the soap.

2). take some rubbing alcohol and clean the area before applying the tank protectors. This gets rid of wax and other residue like oils that would prevent good adhesion (and later causing your tank protectors to peel or bubble). Use a fresh, clean microfiber towel...cotton towels will leave lint that will get trapped under the protectors.

3). position the clear protector with the plastic sheet still on it, so you can see where it will go once you apply the protector. This is a "dry run" so to speak.

4). you'll note that the best position for the DP protectors is about 1/4 inch from the edge on the bottom, and along the side that is closest to the rear of the bike. The top of the protector will rise across a ridge on the tank that seems weird and causes some finessing, but don't let it freak you out.

5). if your bike came with a center stand, use it, so your bike is vertical. This helps in the application of the protectors because your bike will be straight up on both sides of the bike. Otherwise, if you have a rear stand or a fork stand, use it.

6). now wash both of your hands with soap and water. Don't dry with paper towels or terrycloth towels...they will leave lint on your hands! If you need to dry your hands, use the microfiber towel you used for the alcohol.

7). you are now ready to apply the first protector. Pick a side, any side, and spray the tank area liberally with the water/soap mixture. Shove a little bit of the microfiber towel under the tank area and over the engine area to soak up excess liquid. Next, spray your hands liberally with soapy water...this prevents finger prints. Then, gently use your fingers to remove the tank protector from the clear sheet that it comes on, using only the edges of the protector to lift and handle to minimize fingerprints.

8). carefully position the protector onto the area where you'll apply it. There will be soap bubbles and liquid dripping from it but that's okay. The protector will want to slip around and that's okay. You want it to be slippery so you can position it properly. Use the 1/4 inch guidelines around the bottom and rear-side to position the protector.

9). holding the protector with one hand, use the other hand's fingers to squeegee the liquid from under the protector, going from top to bottom (let gravity help you out). Once you get most of the liquid out, the protector will start to stick because the adhesive will start taking over. Take the credit card or other plastic tool like a freezer defrosting tool to gently squeegee the liquid from underneath the protector. Work from top to bottom, center to the outside edges, and firmly but carefully squeezing water out as you go.

10). once you've got almost all of the bubbles out, use a hair dryer (set on HIGH heat) or a heat gun, and blow the protector to help it dry, all the while, squeezing out the last of the bubbles out. The heat will also soften the upper portion of the protector to allow it to stick over the ridge mentioned above. Once the protector is nicely "de-bubbled", you can take your microfiber towel and dry it everything off, making sure that the edges are firmly patted down and all the remaining water is out. The hair dryer/heat gun will help dry the edges out. If you're using a heat gun, be careful not to overheat the plastic or the paint! You don't want to fry everything and ruin the expensive paint job on your new baby.

11). repeat steps 7 through 10 for the other side. Now let the bike sit for several hours to let the protectors to sufficiently dry out. Overnight is better, so you don't accidentally move them with your knees. You're done! Good luck.
:D
 

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Hi all, sorry if anyone has posted this before... but I've noticed scratch/wear marks on the paint where my knees rub on the gas tank.
I know some use 3M tape, but was wondering if anyone knew of some cooler options. I saw a crotch rocket the other day with what looked like knee grip tape attached/stuck on in that area and it looked pretty cool, but was obviously specifically made for this function. Would be cool to have some sort of carbon fiber sticker/protector to put there for paint protection/aesthetics. Did a Google search and didn't really find anything, but maybe someone knows.
thanks
b
I cut myself a similar pattern to the DP tank protector using 3M Dinoc film
 

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I also got the DP clear tank protectors and they look great on my white touring. I got the clear ones because I was worried that the faux carbon ones would chop up the nice lines of the bike below the tank. I'm glad I went with the clear because they're virtually invisible from a few feet away.

Some tips on applying these tank protectors (especially the clear ones where you don't want air bubbles and finger prints showing through):

What you'll need:

a). a new set of DP tank protectors;
b). a clean, empty spritzer bottle;
c). clear tap water and a few drops of liquid dish soap like Dawn liquid;
d). some rubbing alcohol;
e). blow dryer or heat gun;
f). an old plastic credit card or plastic freezer defrosting tool with smooth edges, to use as a squeegee;
g). a clean, dry microfiber hand towel;
h). half an hour of time and some patience.

Now, let's get started:

1). get a clean spritzer bottle and fill with clean water; add a few drops of liquid dishwater soap like Dawn liquid, and gently shake the bottle to mix up the soap.

2). take some rubbing alcohol and clean the area before applying the tank protectors. This gets rid of wax and other residue like oils that would prevent good adhesion (and later causing your tank protectors to peel or bubble). Use a fresh, clean microfiber towel...cotton towels will leave lint that will get trapped under the protectors.

3). position the clear protector with the plastic sheet still on it, so you can see where it will go once you apply the protector. This is a "dry run" so to speak.

4). you'll note that the best position for the DP protectors is about 1/4 inch from the edge on the bottom, and along the side that is closest to the rear of the bike. The top of the protector will rise across a ridge on the tank that seems weird and causes some finessing, but don't let it freak you out.

5). if your bike came with a center stand, use it, so your bike is vertical. This helps in the application of the protectors because your bike will be straight up on both sides of the bike. Otherwise, if you have a rear stand or a fork stand, use it.

6). now wash both of your hands with soap and water. Don't dry with paper towels or terrycloth towels...they will leave lint on your hands! If you need to dry your hands, use the microfiber towel you used for the alcohol.

7). you are now ready to apply the first protector. Pick a side, any side, and spray the tank area liberally with the water/soap mixture. Shove a little bit of the microfiber towel under the tank area and over the engine area to soak up excess liquid. Next, spray your hands liberally with soapy water...this prevents finger prints. Then, gently use your fingers to remove the tank protector from the clear sheet that it comes on, using only the edges of the protector to lift and handle to minimize fingerprints.

8). carefully position the protector onto the area where you'll apply it. There will be soap bubbles and liquid dripping from it but that's okay. The protector will want to slip around and that's okay. You want it to be slippery so you can position it properly. Use the 1/4 inch guidelines around the bottom and rear-side to position the protector.

9). holding the protector with one hand, use the other hand's fingers to squeegee the liquid from under the protector, going from top to bottom (let gravity help you out). Once you get most of the liquid out, the protector will start to stick because the adhesive will start taking over. Take the credit card or other plastic tool like a freezer defrosting tool to gently squeegee the liquid from underneath the protector. Work from top to bottom, center to the outside edges, and firmly but carefully squeezing water out as you go.

10). once you've got almost all of the bubbles out, use a hair dryer (set on HIGH heat) or a heat gun, and blow the protector to help it dry, all the while, squeezing out the last of the bubbles out. The heat will also soften the upper portion of the protector to allow it to stick over the ridge mentioned above. Once the protector is nicely "de-bubbled", you can take your microfiber towel and dry it everything off, making sure that the edges are firmly patted down and all the remaining water is out. The hair dryer/heat gun will help dry the edges out. If you're using a heat gun, be careful not to overheat the plastic or the paint! You don't want to fry everything and ruin the expensive paint job on your new baby.

11). repeat steps 7 through 10 for the other side. Now let the bike sit for several hours to let the protectors to sufficiently dry out. Overnight is better, so you don't accidentally move them with your knees. You're done! Good luck.
:D

I've heard this technique before for use on application of car decals. I've always wondered why there wouldn't be a soapy residue which would inhibit or decrease the adhesion to the part being applied to. Comments?
 

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I've heard this technique before for use on application of car decals. I've always wondered why there wouldn't be a soapy residue which would inhibit or decrease the adhesion to the part being applied to. Comments?
Hi, Jay,

The technique works really well. By the time you squeeze all the soapy water out, the adhesive will stick and will not be inhibited by any small residue of soap. I've used this many times for 3M film and other protectors. Works like a charm. The heat gun works really well to get all the moisture out.
 

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Hi, Jay,

The technique works really well. By the time you squeeze all the soapy water out, the adhesive will stick and will not be inhibited by any small residue of soap. I've used this many times for 3M film and other protectors. Works like a charm. The heat gun works really well to get all the moisture out.
Sounds good. I will try it. I have had the carbon fiber protectors in my garage since I bought the bike. Wasnt sure I would use them but I am also seeing scratches on the side panel despite not having alot of miles on the bike.

jay
 

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The clear ones blend in really well, nice fit and hard to see they are on. Not sure why you would pick the carbon-look-a-like one. It's more expensive, and it's not carbon, so it's not lighter. :) Mine got scratches really bad the first 600 miles, but when you put the clear on, it acts like a clear-coat, and the scratches disapear.

The other solution would be venture shield, but does it keep scratches off from heavy knee-rubbing?
I bought the black DP ones for like 100$ or so. They are very expensive.
Put them on and pulled them on like an half hour later.
The cf is different then the parts of the bike and it is greyish, not black. So on my black bike it was hideous.

I could've gone to a hooker for 100$. I would've gotten more time and quality for the money.
 

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Tech Spec

Check out Tech Spec. I have them on my ST3 and they really work well. However, they are black and will obviously show on any bike but a black one.
 

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Image request please...

Would someone share pics of their DP carbon tank protectors (top and/or sides)?

If anyone has the DP clear tank protectors (top and/or sides), please post as well.

Thank you...
 

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