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Discussion Starter #1
Just had a pair of Meztler Interact Z6 spooned on at the dealer and am in the middle of reinstall the front (rear went well so far). On the right side the bearing is flush to the outside. On the left side near the spacer, the bearing is recessed inside the rim and is exposed to the weather. I would think that this should be covered with some kind of seal or spacer or something. The parts diagram shows an "inner seal" part # 0000.64471, but that is only a thin ring around the outside. So the question is, am I missing a part or is this just the Ducati design. The bike is a 2006 ST3 that I bought second hand. Also the parts diagram seems to be used on several different Ducati models. I have posted 2 pics in the gallery under "spikemike"

All help is appreciated. BTW, Phibbs PowerSports in Albany, NY priced the tires very competively to online prices at about $170 rear and $130 front.
 

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The newer ST3 models have an electronic speedo. I think the encoder wheel and pickup is on the rear.

Older models, that have the mechanical speedo use a gearbox on the left front that :
1) goes into that recess and gets driven by a speedo-drive-plate
2) the large diameter seal helps keep crud out of there via gearbox-to-seal interface
3) the gearbox acts as the spacer that you're using.

The bearings are fairly sealed already, and there's no need for extra seals (otherwise the one on the right would have an additional seal).

My suspicion is that they used the same wheel, and rather than get rid of the recess, it just easier to use the older wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I believe you are right. I saw another ST3 and Multistrada at lunch today and the area is wide open. I still think it allows too much dirt in there though
 

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The seal ring and spacer you mention are it on the left side. The bearings do have small seals that cover the ball bearings themselves. Every year I carefully pry up those seals and check the bearings. I'll pack a bit more grease into them if needed and then replace the seals. They pop down in a bit. It's pretty obvious once you look at them. You'll need a very fine, pointy tool to pry them up. Be careful not to damage the rubber edges.
Bill W.
 
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