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Discussion Starter #1
Quick question. I just got a 2005 Multi S. Ohlins front and back. It goes in to the shop next weekend for general check and setup. I'm riding it this weekend. The front forks are way to soft for me. I'm 225 pounds. Going like 2 mph and then stopping makes the forks take a nose dive. Is there an easy way to tighten them up before I ride in a couple days? The dealer will fix it all but can I just tighten or loosen the tops with an allen wrench to provide a better feel until then?
 

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I suggest having a professional do the measurements and a proper setup for you. If you've got a couple of friends who can help you with holding the bike and taking the sag measurements then do it yourself. Anybody can do it once you know the steps, and there is plenty of information on the web and youtube explaining the process of setting the sag. Compression and rebound are more personal preference and feel, and you can tweak those yourself once you get the sag right for your weight.
 

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For starters its great you have the Ohlins suspension with all the adjustment points. Sorting them out may sound a little confusing at first, it was for me, but eventually it comes around.

Basic suspension points on the Ohlins MTS:
Top fork adjusters are rebound and spring preload, bottom one is compression. In the back there are three outer adjustment points, helping you adjust the bike to the load. They are rebound damping, compression damping and then the isolated knob that sticks out of the frame slightly is the spring preload. Then there is the SAG adjustment (leaving this out for now but very doable with help).

Like you and many others I found the suspension settings on my Multi were not dialed to my weight and riding style when I bought it used. Actually they still aren't until I can get the bike to someone like Dave Moss or Phil Douglas. So I set about learning about suspension lingo then actually learned how to do some basic adjusting. I had the luxury of going on a long overnighter ride and we made multiple break and photo stops. This was a perfect opportunity to fine tune the bike because the roads provided the conditions to test my settings. I adjusted at small increments, one click two clicks max. I found the sweet spot in time, but I still like dabbling with it. Again, I'll get it fine tuned through a suspension guru, but for now its greatly improved.

Here are some links that will help you:

http://wolfcentral.net/multistrada/suspension.htm

http://www.amazon.com/Sportbike-Suspension-Tuning-Andrew-Trevitt/dp/1893618455

http://www.sportrider.com/suspension_settings/146_suggested_suspension_settings/index.html

Just my opinion, but your symptoms point to a common issue and you can improve it by messing with the top 3mm allen preload adjustment. Coordinate that adjustment with the lower 3mm allen compression adjustment. The owner's manual has a few errors in it and can cause confusion.

I started with factory settings on both front and rear outer adjustments and went from there. Since you weigh more than the factory profile rider, I would assume you will need to adjust fork rebound, going clockwise a click or two between road tests. During my long ride I also made fewer adjustments to the lower fork compression, it was a ratio in favor of rebound adjustment. I also adjusted the rear knob spring preload while on the fly and I think you should as well because of your weight. Factory setting for this adjuster (its actually adjusts the outer spring of the shock absorber) is full low or full counterclockwise. I would turn the knob clockwise to stiffen it up since it is commonly adjusted to accomodate the extra weight when riding two up.

Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #5
another question

Great response John. When you say to turn the top adjusters clockwise I assume you mean to turn the right on clockwise and the left one counterclockwise? If I turn both clockwise isn't that adding pressure to one and lightening to the other? I'm still at work now so I'll check out your links when I get home...which at this rate will be midnight. Some Friday.
 

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Treat them equally, turn them both the same way, clockwise to harden the suspension and counter clockwise to soften it. If you look at the top of the forks you will see the letters S and H (soft and hard) and little arrows between them pointing the direction of the clock to turn.

In your situation and for quick relief it will come from adjusting the top fork's rebound damping and a little bit of lower fork compression damping. These adjustments will also remedy the "pogo" effect.
 

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Great response John. When you say to turn the top adjusters clockwise I assume you mean to turn the right on clockwise and the left one counterclockwise? If I turn both clockwise isn't that adding pressure to one and lightening to the other? I'm still at work now so I'll check out your links when I get home...which at this rate will be midnight. Some Friday.
Stop eating doughnuts loose some weight and educate yourself on BASIC mechanical engineering!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Are you kidding me?

That was a dick reply. What a total cock bag. I'm a weight lifter you jerk, 225 pounds of solid. I don't eat trash. It's not my fault everyone in Italy is small. Seriously, what a jerk.
 

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That was a dick reply. What a total cock bag. I'm a weight lifter you jerk, 225 pounds of solid. I don't eat trash. It's not my fault everyone in Italy is small. Seriously, what a jerk.
This is what happens often on the internet, a combination of sarcasm and twisted humor at the wrong time.
 
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