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I think it comes with 7.5W. Many replace with 5W though. Depends on what you're after. I like the 5W better, and it was easy to get off the shelf locally. Most carry 5 or 10W, and you'd have to mix them to get 7.5W. Not sure what’s available where you live.
 

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Oh boy, an OIL thread! hehe, just kidding ;)
LOL. I don't think fork oil falls into that category! Could, I guess. Anyway, I’ve been using BelRay 5W with the ST and my recent Race Tech tuning endeavors. Seems fine, and it’s blue so it has to be good! I also once used Honda brand (also 5W) fork oil in my SS. Seemed OK too, didn’t explode or anything. Hell Showa is made in Japan, who knows, the Honda stuff may have been OEM...
 

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Old Wizard
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The recommended oil weight for the front forks is 7.5 weight. If you increase the weight, you’re using a higher viscosity. This means that you will increase the rebound and compression damping at every click setting.

So, the only reason to change from the recommended viscosity is if you run out of high (or low) damper settings and you need even more (or less) damping than the maximum (minimum) that the stock 7.5 weight gives. Very unlikely.

If you do substitute (say) a 7 weight, you'll need to compensate for the reduced oil viscosity by increasing your fork low-speed settings to recover your compression and rebound damping. However, now you’ll have less high-speed damping than the fork manufacturer and Ducati engineering intended because high-speed damping is controlled by the flow rate through the internal shim stack and unaffected by damper click settings.

Keep in mind that different fluid manufacturers rate their viscosity differently so you can’t compare using labeled oil weight.

Comparative Oil Weights Table
 

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Mike_Bike, are you rebuilding your forks or just changing the fluid?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes I' m actually rebuilding my forks. Do you have something in mind?


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No, I've been thinking of changing the fluid but everything I've been able find written about forks points to rebuilding rather than just changing the fluid.
I was hoping you were going to tell me a way to change the fluid.
Good luck!
Jerry

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No, I've been thinking of changing the fluid but everything I've been able find written about forks points to rebuilding rather than just changing the fluid.
I was hoping you were going to tell me a way to change the fluid.
Good luck!
Jerry



Mike_Bike, sorry for changing the subject, but just a short answer to Jduke.

The way I did it, is not the best but my simple and cheap way with not a lot of tools.

Take off the front wheel, loosen the allen bolts of the upper yokes that hold the tube, insert a long allen ( I can't remember the size) at the bottom of the stuncheon (where you would insert a screw driver to adjust the compression of the fork) and unscrew slowly until oil starts to come out. PUT A CONTAINER UNDERNEATH TO COLLECT ALL THE OIL THAT WILL COME OUT TO MEASURE IT. Unscrew the 17mm screw at the top of the tube to let air move in and allow the oil to drain faster. If you can blow some compressed air through the tube, it would be helpful.
Screw in the allen bolt at the bottom, measure the oil that came out and refill with the same quantity.
Refit the tyre with the upper 17mm screw loose and with the tyre on shake the front up and down to allow any air mixed in the fluid to get at the surface. Screw in all the bolts and you are good to go.
I say it again, it's not the best way, but it's the simplest I found.
 

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Life is too short to worry !
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No, I've been thinking of changing the fluid but everything I've been able find written about forks points to rebuilding rather than just changing the fluid.
I was hoping you were going to tell me a way to change the fluid.
Good luck!
Jerry



Mike_Bike, sorry for changing the subject, but just a short answer to Jduke.

The way I did it, is not the best but my simple and cheap way with not a lot of tools.

Take off the front wheel, loosen the allen bolts of the upper yokes that hold the tube, insert a long allen ( I can't remember the size) at the bottom of the stuncheon (where you would insert a screw driver to adjust the compression of the fork) and unscrew slowly until oil starts to come out. PUT A CONTAINER UNDERNEATH TO COLLECT ALL THE OIL THAT WILL COME OUT TO MEASURE IT. Unscrew the 17mm screw at the top of the tube to let air move in and allow the oil to drain faster. If you can blow some compressed air through the tube, it would be helpful.
Screw in the allen bolt at the bottom, measure the oil that came out and refill with the same quantity.
Refit the tyre with the upper 17mm screw loose and with the tyre on shake the front up and down to allow any air mixed in the fluid to get at the surface. Screw in all the bolts and you are good to go.
I say it again, it's not the best way, but it's the simplest I found.
What bike is this based on , all the ST's have a compression adjuster underneath not an allen bolt ????

You cannot do it this way unless you have non-standard forks to the best of my knowledge...................
 

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Thank YOU!!!
I couldn't believe there wasn't a simply way to just change the fluid.

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Oh...posted too soon....

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What bike is this based on , all the ST's have a compression adjuster underneath not an allen bolt ????
Yes, I should have written a socket Nr 12 ( if I remember well). The compression adjuster is attached on a 12mm head bolt. And I had to use a compressed air gun to unscrew it.
 

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Forgot to add page Nr 96 of the workshop manual for photos. In some models instead of a hexagon they have allen bolts.
 

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This is pretty simple as far as the mechanical skills required goes, but it's messy work and requires a fair amount of effort to get the forks off the bike and apart. You really should go in to the forks at least to the point where you've removed the springs so you can pump the cartridge to be sure all the old oil is out, and to bleed air from the cartridge once the new oil is in. Also important is the manual gives oil levels assuming you are measuring with the springs out.

You can do it with out removing the springs. It's harder, as you will have to work against the spring to bleed the cartridge and you may not get all the old oil out. You will also have to measure your current level with the springs in to restore the new oil to that level (hoping it was correct to start with). Oil level makes a pretty dramatic difference in fork performance.

How many miles? Sure your seals aren’t due for a refresh?

To just change the oil, you can stop after pulling the spring. No need to pull the cartridge or separate the slider and tube. You will need some tools, home made or bought, to get the spring out. If you separate the slider, you will need a seal driver to reassemble. This is an expensive tool for what you get, but you need it. I've tried the short cuts, the tool is better.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=showa fork oil change&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CGYQFjAA&url=http://www.mad-ducati.com/Technical/Fork_oil_replacement.pdf&ei=hF_gT8alKu2K6QGMzrCAAQ&usg=AFQjCNHRqfmZRNtcGluByL1XEB-1lgD4PQ

This and the seal driver are the only tools I have. The bleeder and the fancy oil level thing I do without.
Fork Spring Compressor Kit

If you're thinking of draining it from the bottom by pulling the compression adjuster, I wouldn't bother doing it at all. It probably works, and I know people used to do it that way, but that was before we had cartridge forks and still used automatic transmission fluid as fork oil...
 

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Life is too short to worry !
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"If you're thinking of draining it from the bottom by pulling the compression adjuster, I wouldn't bother doing it at all. It probably works, and I know people used to do it that way, but that was before we had cartridge forks and still used automatic transmission fluid as fork oil."

Exactly !
 

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I know you're right...just didn't want to have to do it but since I'm doing it as preventative rather than having too I might as well do it right.
Question on the tools, I know I can't make the tool for less than I can buy the Traxxion one, will it work just as well?
 

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Life is too short to worry !
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I know you're right...just didn't want to have to do it but since I'm doing it as preventative rather than having too I might as well do it right.
Question on the tools, I know I can't make the tool for less than I can buy the Traxxion one, will it work just as well?
Take a read of these for an idea of what you are getting in to / what you will need.
 

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I know I can't make the tool for less than I can buy the Traxxion one, will it work just as well?
Are you asking if the Traxxion tool works as well as the home made? Don't know if it does, but I do know the Traxxion tool works perfectly, is durable and not all that expensive. If you only ever pull your forks apart once, the price of the tool may seem like a lot. But consider that once you see how easy it is to do this work, you'll start thinking about revalveing, new springs, eventually you'll need seals... You will use it again!
 
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