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Discussion Starter #41
Stone chip resistant film is the way to go for that - have used it on the leading edges of aircraft for the same reason. After looking at the forks I have decided that its potentially do able but would require a lot of work. Will ponder it for another day I think.
 

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Carbon and alloy are not very happy together if you get any moisture and salt. We have had an alloy slug and carbon tube corrode together literally overnight and we did have some anti corrosion compound on it. If you want the look you maybe should consider carbon look vinyl. I know it's really rice boy car look but unless you can laminate on with some tension it's not going to help structurally. If you bag it on it looks pretty sad as it gathers up. You end up sanding a bunch off then covering it with twill cloth.

There are some really good shops over there that could do the job if you want it done properly. But I don't think there is any benefit doing it without adding some bulk to the legs.


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Discussion Starter #43
Welding rods turned up the other day and decided to have a practise run before jumping in. After a couple of goes over the week on some scrap I decided to pull the trigger today and start the process of very carefully welding the cracks. I heated the tubes to open up the cracks and marked where I thought they ended before allowing it to cool and putting a fine stop drill at that point. Did a series of small tack welds in the center of the crack then start in the centre point working out towards the stop drill point making sure that I worked in small, short welds taking a minute or two between each of the welds to ensure that the tube wasn't getting to hot. It was painfully slow process and got a bit tight in a couple of places trying to get the torch at the right angle but after some careful negotiating around the tubes it was all completed. Quick run over with a file and the grinder with a sanding disc to clean up the welds and flatten them off and it is ready for the next phase when the replacement tube turns up. So far so good. Also plug welded the two holes for the makers plate - that is going to be fitted some where else on the frame when I am done
 

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
After a lot of mucking around in our paint shop sifting through the colour charts and colour chips I have found a close enough match for the original frame colour and found the red as well - the boys are going to do a spray out of the red for me some time in the nest week or two. Frame colour is going to be a Fiat colour called "Sabbia" colour code 731A from DuPont (Cromax). I will use some flattering base in the clear to give it a semi gloss look once it is done.

Also been cleaning out the shed ready for the next phase of the process - the making up of the bracket to be welded over the repaired area of tube. Tomorrows job will be to make up the template for the bracket out of some scrap alli that I have lying around to get all the measurements right Can't believe how hard it is to get 4130 in this country. Managed to get a piece but it is only enough for one go so no messing it up.

Also had a chance to look at what needs to be done as so far as the carbon parts are concerned. The tank is going to be the real challenge - if any one has any photos of one I would really be interested in seeing where they have made the joins. I have a pretty good idea how I want to do it but I am looking around for a spare tank with a rust hole or damage light damage on it at the moment to use as a donor - want to cut it open so I can get all the bracket dimensions for the inside sorted.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Had a chance to go and mix all the paint up today - 2K for the frame which I will coat with a semi gloss clear to protect it and clear over base for the body work. Every thing is falling into place slowly.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
After some closser inspection of the front end of the bike I have found some additional damage to the fork tubes in the chrome plating which I did not need to find. Have sent off a series of emails about the cost of a replacement set of forks from a number of suppliers around the place to see what the damage is going to be. I may end up going down the road of having to replace them with a set of Ohlins forks after all. Any suggestions from any body??????
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Had a look on line but they don't have anything suitable that I can see. Corsa have a complete 916sps front end and will wait to see how much that is going to set me back before I commit.
 

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Discussion Starter #50 (Edited)
After a lot of analysing of the benefits of upgrading the front suspension, I have had a chance to go for a blast on a bike that has had the internals of the forks replaced by a New Zealand based suspension expert. The difference between my bike and his is unbelievable. As much as I would like to go down the road of changing out the front end, the more I look at it, the more expensive an option it gets and I just can't justify it. So the original plan of up grading the internal of the forks, replacing with new but re-anodised outer tubes along with replacing the lower legs with titanium nitride coated stanchions is the path that I will take - this time around.

Have also heard back from JPrecission (finally) and was stunned at the cost of the cylinder head work - in a good way. For what you get for your money this would have to rate as a must do for anyone, I have just put this at the top of my priority list of things to do while I wait for the tubing to arrive for the frame modification/repair. To that end, the heads have been removed from the engine and have been partially stripped down. Found that the bores are in as new conditioning with hone marks still in them. The heads though were not in as good a condition as I first thought. It appears that one of the valve guides has been leaking a small amount of oil into the intake judging by the carbon build up around one part of the valve and intake. It looks like the valve guide itself has come loose and allowing to let the oil in this way. Also found that the tops of the pistons and the combustion chambers had a lot of carbon build-up - a lot more than what I was expecting to see. The rest of the parts are all in excellent condition which was a relief. Cams have got some strange markings on them - VHT and DVT. Anyone know what cam profile that they refer too??? Just need to make up a tool to remove the cam shaft pulleys and the job will be complete.

Paint is all mixed up and ready to go. I have decided to stick with the original paint scheme with some exposed carbon but have changed the red to a Cagiva 'Rosso'. formulated in 1995 it is a shade or two darker than what I have on the bike at the moment. As mentioned before I have found a gold that is pretty close for the frame and that is sitting in the work shop as well. I have chosen to use a 2K rather than clear over base but I will be using a semi gloss clear over the top. Reason being that the 2K is a lot stronger than the base coat so it should in theory hold onto the frame a bit better. normally I would not go this route for a metallic colour as you can have all sorts of issues with the colour been inconsistent if you apply it to heavy but I have used this method before for small components and it has worked for me.
 

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Remember that the bores are nikasil (or similar) coated - so they will always have 'hone marks', as that's the pattern of the coating. ;)

What are you planning to get done on your heads? And have you checked out these guys - NZ Cylinders - Cylinder head machining ?
I haven't used them, but one of the Aussies on here just got his cylinders and heads done ( a few weeks ago), and reported that they did a good job, for a reasonable price...

And CRC 'Gasket Stripper' is great stuff for removing carbon buildup from the tops of pistons and inside cylinder heads. Just don't get it on your skin! I did the pistons on my v6 Mitsi, and they came up looking like new (well, as new as 200,000+ kms was ever going to look), without having to resort to using a scraper.
 

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What are you planning to get done on your heads? And have you checked out these guys - NZ Cylinders - Cylinder head machining ?
I haven't used them, but one of the Aussies on here just got his cylinders and heads done ( a few weeks ago), and reported that they did a good job, for a reasonable price...
Yeah, that was me. :D I've reassembled the motor, but not fired it up yet. The NZ Cylinder guys appear to have done a very good job and I was definitely very happy with the price, service and communication. I'd use them again in a heartbeat.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
I am getting the heads welded up, CNC ported to suit, New valves, valve guides, valve seats fitted and machined, spark plug repositioned and a second plug hole machined in along with the supply of new high performce valve guide seals.

Pistons are going to get swapped out for high compression ones at this point since the bores are in such good condition.

I have another method of removing the carbon from the pistions and for general cleaning of components - I have access to a number of blasting processes that are perfect for this type of work. Soda blasting is one of the better ways, removes all the crap without harming the surface in any way and disolves away to nothing if it is cleaned in warm water after the blasting process. I have found that the shower is the best way for this to occur, just don't get caught by the wife taking a shower with your engine parts, you might have some serious explaining to do...............

I would have used these guys if it wasn't for the port work that is getting done.
 

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There seems to be several variations of reinforcements over the years and they still cracked.
Here's my `95 before I had it repaired / welded at FrameCrafters in Union IL.
In this case the crack began at the weld and propogated around the base of the weld blob where a stress riser was created.

This photo says it all. I'll bet that frame was cracked before it was even painted at the factory. Chromoly is far more prone to stress cracking than mild carbon steel due to it being brittle (high tensile). MIG welding is a high intensity "cold" (fast) weld VS a TIG or oxyacetylene torch weld which adds a lot of heat to the base metal before the filler is introduced. This additional heat means the weld cools slower and reduces the stress on the base material that is resulting in the cracks.

Another way to minimize this stress is to pre-heat the area to be welded in advance and even after welding using a carburizing flame.

I wish I knew what MIG wire & gas combo is recommended for welding Chromoly. Ducati is the first I've ever seen weld it with a MIG process and KTM is the second, but owning both I can tell you that KTM's are welded much better than the Ducks.

Noteworthy: The NHRA will not certify any chassis made of Chromoly and MIG welded. That should tell us something.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Yep, I'm hearing you but there are quite a few bikes that are still using Cromolly tubing and are MIG welded together El camexican. I have seen some one use S70 welding wire and MIG an off roader chassis together. They used a really fine wire, 0.6mm from memory and made sure that they radiused the weld as they were doing it rather than just a straight blob of weld to join the tubes together. There was a hell if alot of wrist action going on as they welded that was for sure.....
 

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I am getting the heads welded up, CNC ported to suit, New valves, valve guides, valve seats fitted and machined, spark plug repositioned and a second plug hole machined in along with the supply of new high performce valve guide seals.

Pistons are going to get swapped out for high compression ones at this point since the bores are in such good condition.

I have another method of removing the carbon from the pistions and for general cleaning of components - I have access to a number of blasting processes that are perfect for this type of work. Soda blasting is one of the better ways, removes all the crap without harming the surface in any way and disolves away to nothing if it is cleaned in warm water after the blasting process. I have found that the shower is the best way for this to occur, just don't get caught by the wife taking a shower with your engine parts, you might have some serious explaining to do...............

I would have used these guys if it wasn't for the port work that is getting done.
Yeah - I guess having access to aero workshops means you get all the good stuff to play with... Sounds like you're going to end up with something similar to Liams 900. Should be pretty sweet! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Steveb64 - the engine that I am building is going to be quite a bit different to Liam's, basically the next level up from his. I am going to be doing alot of additional engine work on the bottom end, knife edged crank, Carillo rods, etc, etc. The addition of the dual spark plugs and 4 x coils, FCR Kehinins and Ignitech ignition will be the only similarities to be honest. Even looking at a set of carbon wheels as I write this.

Yes, I am blessed with access to alot of "man toys" but not for much longer - I am in the process of leaving the Airforce. Making up my mind at the moment about what I am going to do, long term.
 

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Steveb64 - the engine that I am building is going to be quite a bit different to Liam's, basically the next level up from his. I am going to be doing alot of additional engine work on the bottom end, knife edged crank, Carillo rods, etc, etc. The addition of the dual spark plugs and 4 x coils, FCR Kehinins and Ignitech ignition will be the only similarities to be honest. Even looking at a set of carbon wheels as I write this.

Yes, I am blessed with access to alot of "man toys" but not for much longer - I am in the process of leaving the Airforce. Making up my mind at the moment about what I am going to do, long term.
<sigh> another bike to dream about... ;) Good luck with finding a new career ex Airforce. It seems like the aero industry in NZ is slowly folding, with more and more support/service work being done offshore.
 

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Discussion Starter #60 (Edited)
Finally, another day of work on the bike out of the way. Lh side cover has been removed and all the fittings taken off it along with the sight window and the brass plug for the alternator wires to pass through. The plug and one of the retainer cap screws for the alternator had so much Loctite around it that a liberal amount of heat was required to remove them from the casing. A look at the gear shaft support bush also showed some damage on it via the splines on the shaft itself, so that was removed as well as the very hard seal for the shaft.

The flywheel was removed as well with a minor bit of drama when the fairing support that is mounted onto the horizontal cylinder liner snapped off. I had neglected to remove it and I accidentally knocked the engine on its side. When taking the Flywheel off the mount it to had a liberal amount of high strength Loctite applied to the six mounting screws which again required a dose of heat to get them to move. Quick inspection and every thing seems to be in excellent working order though. Every thing has been cleaned and is now ready for hot glue application to the areas that need to be protected during the blasting process to remove the paint. Also managed to get the rocker covers cleaned at the same time and plan at the moment is going to be to paint what is getting ready this time around same colour as the frame (at this stage). Have also packaged up the first set of screws to be taken into the fasteners shop. I will go through and make up a spreadsheet with all the lengths, quantities and where they are used for future reference.

Also decided to remove the cylinder studs which was pretty uneventful apart from one little anomaly. One of studs had a generous amount of oil down the hole where all the others were bone dry. Some had signs that there had been water down inside at some stage with a number of studs with rusty tide marks around them.
 
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