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Discussion Starter #1
Muschi mentioned (on his thread about going back to a stock bike) that it might be cool to see some of the stuff I've told you guys about while I've been getting to know you. I didn't want to hijack his thread, so I figured I would start another. I know this is way off topic (and for that I apologize), but I offer it as a means to get to know me better.

Unfortunately, I don't have any photos readily available from my early drag racing/motorcycling days. I know I have some, but they are either squirreled away in my basement or in my mom's attic. I do need to find them someday - there are a lot of fond memories there.

So, as a suitable substitute, I would like to show you guys my current "hobby" car. It is a track-prepped '72 Porsche 911 T, with a 3.0L motor built by myself and my then 17 year old son (his first build). He actually helped me build the whole car, starting when he was about eight years old. There is literally not a piece of it we have not held in our hands at one time or another.

Anyway, here is some in-car track video from Pacific Raceways in Kent, Washington - my "home" track, along with some photos of the car. By the way (Ducati content coming;) ), I hope to get the 900 SS out there this summer to try some laps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eGKtqANfS0
 

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very nice car and a very cool video too, looks like lots of experience. :)

last summer was the very first time i sat in one of those, and we had
a short testride, me as a passenger, in a very similar fashion on the
local roads around the neighborhood, some of them autobahns, as the
area i live in is pretty much industrial.

that was wild, took some days to get that out of my head. :think:
 

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Muschi mentioned (on his thread about going back to a stock bike) that it might be cool to see some of the stuff I've told you guys about while I've been getting to know you. I didn't want to hijack his thread, so I figured I would start another. I know this is way off topic (and for that I apologize), but I offer it as a means to get to know me better.

Unfortunately, I don't have any photos readily available from my early drag racing/motorcycling days. I know I have some, but they are either squirreled away in my basement or in my mom's attic. I do need to find them someday - there are a lot of fond memories there.

So, as a suitable substitute, I would like to show you guys my current "hobby" car. It is a track-prepped '72 Porsche 911 T, with a 3.0L motor built by myself and my then 17 year old son (his first build). He actually helped me build the whole car, starting when he was about eight years old. There is literally not a piece of it we have not held in our hands at one time or another.

Anyway, here is some in-car track video from Pacific Raceways in Kent, Washington - my "home" track, along with some photos of the car. By the way (Ducati content coming;) ), I hope to get the 900 SS out there this summer to try some laps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eGKtqANfS0
That looks like fun, but the track doesn't appear too "bike-friendly" (lack of runoff areas). You looked like the fast guy in that session; doesn't anyone else push their car on the track? From what I could discern from the video, you might be shifting a little too much. I found that, as I gathered track knowledge, I carried more speed into corners and shifted much less. That also helped the chassis perform better, as I wasn't giving it so many power inputs. Try it next time.
OBTW, I found the bike much more interesting on track days than most cars - much faster out of turns and allowing more freedom in track placement.
 

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That looks like fun, but the track doesn't appear too "bike-friendly" (lack of runoff areas). You looked like the fast guy in that session; doesn't anyone else push their car on the track? From what I could discern from the video, you might be shifting a little too much. I found that, as I gathered track knowledge, I carried more speed into corners and shifted much less. That also helped the chassis perform better, as I wasn't giving it so many power inputs. Try it next time.
OBTW, I found the bike much more interesting on track days than most cars - much faster out of turns and allowing more freedom in track placement.
I would think that a 3 litre engine in a 1972 chassis would make it fairly tail heavy, so maybe that's why he is more cautious about the curves... I would be too!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, Pacific Raceways is anything but "bike friendly". It dates from the '50's, before they started to understand the benefits of lots of runoff. Unfortunately, there really isn't room to add any along the whole bottom half (the more technical half) of the track. It runs along the rim of a deep ravine, with a railroad track in the bottom. As a result of this lack of runoff, it's no longer "FIA certified", so the big series no longer stop here. We used to get Can Am and Trans Am in the '60's and early '70's, but not anymore.

There is actually no real difference in weight between Porsche 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, and 3.2 engines. They actually share the same basic engine cases, with the only difference being early 2.0's were aluminum, switching to magnesium in the later 2.0's, and then back to aluminum on the 3.0's. Barrels, heads, cam towers, and all of that are the same. It's pretty much a bolt-in swap (other than induction plumbing and wiring harness) for any 911 within this family of engines.

Yes, I shift a lot. Even a 3.0L is a relatively small, high reving motor. You have to stir the box a lot to keep it up in the meaty part of the power band if you want any kind of drive out of the corners. Seems to work - this car runs low 1:40's, which is a very competitive pace for vintage 911 racing.

Bike content: WERA - Western/Eastern Racing Association - does run here. Lots of clubs as well, like WMRRA - Washington Motorcycle Road Racing Association. I love watching those guys run. Unfortunately, with its lack of runoff, I have seen too many airlifted out over the years to want to try racing with them. There are places on this track where you really don't want to lose it in a car, much less on a bike. Maybe it was o.k. for '50's and '60's era speeds, but it's not even close anymore. They have taken measures to slow the bikes down, like adding a bus stop just before the right hand sweeper onto the front straight, but it isn't enough. It remains a very dangerous track for the motorcycle racers.
 

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Mr Leakered
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Higgy,

I used to hear your 911 in the work parking lot. I'm not there any more (not that I miss it. LOL.), but I miss the sound of your car and seeing the Elise that graced the lot every once in a while. That particular Elise was not a great example, but still tops my list (well to the point of seeing the new F458).

BTW, I was always trying to determine what the holes in the bumper were for?

Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've seen you on your bike around Lynnwood, Tony. Not recently, though - have you moved away?

A few more pics, this time my now 18 year old son's project car. We started this last summer when he was 17, going into his senior year in high school. All of the kids need a year long project, so we built a car.

It started as a '68 912 with a blown motor, so just a roller, really. We converted it to a 911 by installing a mechanically injected 2.4L I had laying around (after freshening it up). Lots of work to go from the carbureted four in the 912 to the injected six; we had to cut the motor mounts out and weld in 911 mounts, all the plumbing was different, wiring harness, all of that. He's pretty proud of it - got an "A" for his efforts. Anyway, the car:
 

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looks as if blue is the family choice for nice 911 and 912,
everybody would liked to have a Dad like that, i had to
learn everything by myself.

:think:

great car...
 

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T?

Just curious, what does the "T" stand for in 911T? Does that mean it had a 356 engine originally?

96SP
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The 912 was the car Porsche built to use up all the old 356 engines. All 911's had the new flat six that replace the flat four of the 365. The "T" stands for "Touring". It was the lowest specification 911 of the day, followed by the "E" (einspritzung) and the top of the line "S" (super). The "T" was the lowest optioned, and therefor the lightest, so it was the homologation car. With the higher output "S" motor, it became the "S/T".

Just to show we are not all blue, here is my older (21 years old) son's '79 SC (Super Carrera) that he bought when he was 19. He spun a rod bearing on about his fifth or sixth track day that first year, so we spent the following winter rebuilding it. The car:
 

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Higgy thanks for sharing the photos and vid. As far as I can tell, (which isn't much) your car lines look very smooth.

I had a stock silver 1972 911s for a couple years, and it's still the only car I ever had any emotional attachment too. And you're right, they're tightly wound, IIRC it needed around 3700 rpm then it got serious. One of the strongest memories was having it in a slightly crossed up drift through a freeway cloverleaf entry, and I drifted right up alongside a CHP in his car. He just waved to keep it cool and kept going......
 

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how it extends to the duc mindset

This is where my classic roots are buried. 1940 Chris craft 37'. Mahogany, oak, and cedar. Powered with twin 1976 Chrysler 318's, 225 hp each. The hard angled chine (the longitudinal timber at the water line) gave her ability to get up and plane no problem - same hull shape as a PT boat/mine sweeper. She was all class, and all action. Like some other things... never saw one with a red hull:D
 

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second pic is great. :cool: :cool:
 

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Mr Leakered
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We are still here and should be at least until our girls graduate. Our youngest is 4yrs old. When I was up north, I had a Kawa ZR-7 with some 40l Givi panniers. Quite often it was the only bike outside the fence during the wet season. The ST came along just over a year ago.

About my only change is that I haven't been getting out much on the weekends, even for quick errands. Too many family activities have been piling on over the past 6mo. It's crazy.

That was a good looking 912 to start with, and one huge undertaking. The outcome was worth it, IMHO. I sent your vid to a friend whose an autocross nut. Nut is defined by his use of an old Pueg 405DL in the cones. He was impressed with your car and your handywork on the track. It also reinforces how much has been lost to the ridiculous weight of newer sports cars.

Crazy Germans. I remember doing a neighbor a favor by changing the airfilter in her VW Cabio. It puts some perspective into the 'ease' of Duc valve adjustments.

A project bike with the daughters would be right up my alley, in about 10yrs (bevel 750!).

Have a good one.
 

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There is actually no real difference in weight between Porsche 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, and 3.2 engines. They actually share the same basic engine cases, with the only difference being early 2.0's were aluminum, switching to magnesium in the later 2.0's, and then back to aluminum on the 3.0's. Barrels, heads, cam towers, and all of that are the same. It's pretty much a bolt-in swap (other than induction plumbing and wiring harness) for any 911 within this family of engines.
except for those damn 2.7 tensioners right? THAT was a big difference...

I still would love to autocross out a 912, but most here are REAL spendy for what you get. Last one I saw was 5k for 250k on the clock! with rust!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
To put things in perspective for my Porsche friends, I tell them that my 900 SS is the "early 911 of the motorcycle world". Conversely, to put things in perspective for my motorcycling friends, I tell them the early 911 is the "900 SS of the sports car world". The similarities in philosophy and function, in how they make their speed, are remarkable.

Neither is the most powerful in its respective circles. Both are very light relative to the competition; both have outstanding brakes and handling. Both will really surprise far more modern, complex, expensive, and powerful machines, quite often beating them. But most of all, both are very involving to ride/drive. They both take every subtle little input, some of which are barely even conscious thoughts, and translate them into immediate action. They almost sense your thoughts, and communicate with us at an almost subliminal level. There are no on-board electronic/mechanical aids or nannies between us and the road to bail us out. They are both about as "pure" as it gets. I like that.
 
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