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I've been carrying a tire repair kit on my motorcycles for decades but I've never had a flat until yesterday. I was 30 miles from a town and way out of cell range. I was rolling again in about 20 minutes I have a few things to share: carry a kit and practice using it (on an old tire) at home. You will need good power for the compressor and the dashboard socket is not enough. I have a pigtail (in-line fused) attached to my battery. I used a cheep Slime pump. It worked fine but I would upgrade for a round the world trip. In my practice sessions at home I've had no luck the the Stop and Go mushroom plugs and no success with the Dyna plugs with the brass tip. Sticky strings work best. The problem is by the time you need to use them the little tube of rubber cement has dried up. I strongly advise the use of the Nealeytireperairkit.com . They are strings and work just like strings but they are impregnated with glue (no tube of glue needed) and they last for many years.
 

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Just got up... read the title as "Fiat's happen"... and thought "Yes unfortunate as that may be, they do. Not many in the US though" ... then I thought "Well the 500 Abarth isn't bad... needs AWD and 300hp tho".

I carry a kit when I'm touring but not as a general rule around home. Since I do ride dirt roads with touring and ADV tires I do get flats (Pirelli's seem especially susceptible)... 3 so far on the Multi (none since I switched to Pilot Road's for touring though).

We've tried a number of the small kits over the years... the only one I've found that can get tires to 35psi or so is the Aerostitch (and is still very compact). Most of the low cost Chinese units can't get pressures much over 20psi.

I've also learned not to be stingy with plugs... about half the punctures I've had took more than one to actually stop the leak. Put them in all at once, and don't be shy with the reamer (to get the hole prepared for the plugs). Then change the tire as soon as you get somewhere with a dealer (so always take your wheel socket).
 

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What's the consensus on the kit supplied by Ducati in the tool kit? I've looked at it but not opened all the packages and examined the parts.

I've had 2 rear tire flats on my Harleys at high way speeds with the wife on back and fully loaded but I've never carried a flat kit. I've plugged many car tires but never a motorcycle tire.
 

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Thanks for the tips! I just ordered one of the Nealey mini repair kits. I've been carrying around a slime kit with compressor and goop along with the slime string plug kit with the rubber cement. This will give me a bit more confidence should I experience a flat along the way.
 

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What's the consensus on the kit supplied by Ducati in the tool kit? I've looked at it but not opened all the packages and examined the parts.

I've had 2 rear tire flats on my Harleys at high way speeds with the wife on back and fully loaded but I've never carried a flat kit. I've plugged many car tires but never a motorcycle tire.
I had to use the Ducati kit on my rear tire after I picked up a nail or something on my way up to Laguna Seca for WSBK. I had a couple issues.

First, the sticky strings in my kit were a little dried out. They held air in the short term but would leak down overnight. I reamed those back out and used fresh strings from car parts place and those held until I replaced the tire some time later.

Second, the CO2 inflator barely got the job done. I can't remember how many of the CO2 cartridges I used, but it was all of them. I think I only got to 15psi or something like that, so I had to limp around looking for a air pump to finish the job.

I have a Slime pump now that I removed from its enormous housing. Not as cool as some of the purpose-made ADV units, but I think it will get the job done.
 

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I had to use the Ducati kit on my rear tire after I picked up a nail or something on my way up to Laguna Seca for WSBK. I had a couple issues.

First, the sticky strings in my kit were a little dried out. They held air in the short term but would leak down overnight. I reamed those back out and used fresh strings from car parts place and those held until I replaced the tire some time later.

Second, the CO2 inflator barely got the job done. I can't remember how many of the CO2 cartridges I used, but it was all of them. I think I only got to 15psi or something like that, so I had to limp around looking for a air pump to finish the job.

I have a Slime pump now that I removed from its enormous housing. Not as cool as some of the purpose-made ADV units, but I think it will get the job done.
So, adequate but don't bet the farm on it
 

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The last flat I got the tire ended up totally destroyed.
Had to flag someone down to call them for me when they got to cell phone service.
I carry plugs and CO2, but also a AAA card.
Also an AMA card, since I am a life member.
Flats suck.
 

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I have an AltRider rack on the back of my bike with a Kriega US 20 dry bag permanently attached. Aside from its use to carry water, a fleece and rain gear according to the weather, I always have:

- A Nealey Tire repair kit
- A leatherman / penknife to cut the strings
- A Dynaplug mini pro inflator powered off the bikes ports or battery. I've successfully got my ST3R rear tyre (180/55) to 42PSI with this when my son got a flat.
- A steel socket for the front and rear wheels
- My AAA card
 

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I've had good luck with sticky strings without bothering with the glue. Last flat was about a month ago on the Street Triple, still holding fine.
 

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I'm a bit surprised at all the folks who continue to ride damaged tires with string repairs. I either take them in for a proper repair (which has a flat inner patch combined with a plug) or throw them away.

I love the sticky strings because they've gotten me out of some nasty jams (flat in New Mexico on a dirt road that was supposed to be a 'short cut' at 1am being the most adventurous), but they're not intended to be permanent fixes.
 

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I'm a bit surprised at all the folks who continue to ride damaged tires with string repairs. I either take them in for a proper repair (which has a flat inner patch combined with a plug) or throw them away.



I love the sticky strings because they've gotten me out of some nasty jams (flat in New Mexico on a dirt road that was supposed to be a 'short cut' at 1am being the most adventurous), but they're not intended to be permanent fixes.

I assume the first part is an anecdotal comment as I only count one person on this particular thread who said they were still running a patched tyre?

Quote from the Nealey web site:

“Tubeless tire repair kits that plug the hole and patch the inside of the tire quickly, permanently, and easily.”

Personally I haven’t run a patch permanently, my punctures have both occurred when the tyre was close to the end of its life and so replacement was the natural next step. If I were on a trip, such as WCM recently, around 2k miles for me, and suffered a straightforward puncture, I’d probably wait until I was home to replace the tyre, but I do carry the oversize socket just in case.




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I assume the first part is an anecdotal comment as I only count one person on this particular thread who said they were still running a patched tyre?

Quote from the Nealey web site:

“Tubeless tire repair kits that plug the hole and patch the inside of the tire quickly, permanently, and easily.”

Personally I haven’t run a patch permanently, my punctures have both occurred when the tyre was close to the end of its life and so replacement was the natural next step. If I were on a trip, such as WCM recently, around 2k miles for me, and suffered a straightforward puncture, I’d probably wait until I was home to replace the tyre, but I do carry the oversize socket just in case.

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Yes anecdotal... read a few comments about folks using strings and then running them. I was always pretty uncomfortable with a string patch.
 

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Yes anecdotal... read a few comments about folks using strings and then running them. I was always pretty uncomfortable with a string patch.

While I wouldn’t tell someone that it’s a permanent fix, there are indeed reports of people doing many miles on them. In part it may depend on the bike and how it is ridden, even how close you are to either home or a dealer with a replacement. I would not do a track day on one — not that I do track days — but on a clean repair that holds pressure over a day or two I also wouldn’t treat replacement as a fire drill.



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I'm generally in favor of taking the tire off for a proper plug and patch after using the strings, but if the tire is successfully holding air and I'm not hitting the track, it's not an ASAP sort of thing for me.

When I picked up a nail on a road trip last summer, I used the strings and called around Monterey looking for someone who could do a patch. Best response I got was a place willing to put me on the schedule a week out. Not super helpful, so I rode the bike home. A week or so later I took it to a local independent shop for a new front and patch for the rear. They couldn't break the rear axle nut loose and gave up after they bent a breaker bar. So I gave up too and rode on that tire until it got down to the bars.

That's also about when I bought a big-ass impact wrench from Harbor Freight, a set of the Motion Pro tire levers that also work as a bead breaker, and a balancing set up.

I unscientifically tested the site of the string repair by trying to pry open the hole with a screwdriver and found that I couldn't, at least not until I applied about the same amount of force that would also punch a hole in any other part of the tire.
 

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I did have a tire "spit" out a sticky string repair on a hot stretch of asphalt. So, from my personal experience, I would use it as a temp repair till I can get it replaced. I have no problem with them in car tires long term, just not on my bike if I have a choice. That's just my experience, it's obvious others here have much better success with them.
 

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+1 on the Nealy strings...been using them since shortly after they got started and were mostly marketing for farm tractors. have used them several times and I've had great luck with them holding for fairly substantial mileage after the repair. YMMV. You do need a sharp knife, razor, or some other tool to cut the plug flat so it doesn't pull out. And thanks to the OP for reminding me to reorder a fresh set as the current tube of them is so old that the tube has all the info rubbed off of it.

FYI Re: Towing services: AAA, AMA and other towing services have a mileage limit and usually some language about taking your bike to the nearest mechanical repair facility. I found out that Allstate has a towing service with unlimited mileage and that you can specify where they take your bike/vehicle, ie: to an authorized Duc shop as opposed to the closest Joe's Moto Repairs. I think my last re-up was a bit over $100. for the year. I once called for them to tow my truck and Airstream together from right in the middle of I-70 between Green River and Richfield...for those who know this road, it's a long way from nowhere....and no charge.
 

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I've had 4 'punctures' in 10 yrs/150,000 miles, but the last 2 in 10 days😂. I use Stop & Go mushroom inserts and have never had an issue.......getting home. Once home, I replace the tire. I don't ride on 'patched' tires......rear tire replacement is $250. An ICU visit is.....
 
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