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Discussion Starter #1
Just want to get the general consensus.

I know the first 600mi break-in oil change is important. But how important is it that my Ducati delaer perform it?

$350 for an oil change is just plain old ridiculous. But aside from the price, I have always changed the oil on my previous Japanese bikes.

How many of you forego the first dealer service and do it yourself? Is there something so critical that requires having the dealer perform it???

:confused:
 

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Old Wizard
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Warranty vs. Mods & Maintenance

Doing your own maintenance could void your warranty, so consider this:

The ultimate decision regarding voiding your warranty is Ducati's but if you read your warranty you'll see that Ducati's warranty is not predicated upon an authorized dealer performing all of your maintenance work nor does it require that the motorcycle remain in an unmodified condition or contain only factory parts during the warranty period.

In the US, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act specifically provides that a manufacturer cannot void the warranty on a motorcycle due to an aftermarket part unless they can prove that the aftermarket part caused or contributed to the failure in the vehicle.

However, if you have a claim during the warranty period it's reasonable for Ducati to suspect that inadequate maintenance and/or aftermarket parts had contributed to the failure. But legally they can't just void your entire warranty. They have to prove that the presence of non-factory parts or improper maintenance caused or contributed to the failure.

My 916 Owners Manual says specifically: “Damage which can be attributed to improper, or lack of, maintenance is not covered by your Ducati warranty.” My Manual also designates which service items should be done by Ducati because of special training or equipment requirements. Changing the oil, adjusting the chain, replacing the spark plugs and air filter, and performing fluid checks are not among them.

Conversely, there is an obligation and need that you keep records and receipts that can demonstrate that any maintenance work not performed by Ducati was done according to the service schedule and all replacement fluids met Ducati's specification.

To avoid any concerns, any performance parts that you install have to meet Ducati's specification as well. The only parts that meet this criteria are Ducati Performance parts and they have to be installed by an authorized dealer for the parts themselves to be covered under warranty and to avoid warranty issues on the motorcycle itself.

Consequently, if you decide to install any non-Ducati part or use a non-approved lubricant, fuel, or hydraulic fluid and you experience a related failure, expect a warranty challenge on a case-by-case basis. For example, if you change your oil and filter yourself and later have an engine seizure determined by Ducati to be the result of inadequate lubrication you've got a problem.

So, even though a dealer cannot say that your entire warranty is void due to (say) aftermarket pipes, you'll loose if you have an engine failure that can be traced to an excessively lean fuel condition caused by installing an incorrect Eprom for example.

Aftermarket parts usually carry their own warranty and often are of higher quality than OEM parts but still can cause problems if improperly installed, and it may be unwise to substitute a part (say a filter) simply because it's less expensive than the OEM unit.
 

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I know that the Owner's Manual says:
Engine oil and oil filters must be changed by a Ducati
Dealer or authorised Service Centre at the intervals specified
in the scheduled maintenance table reported in the Warranty
Booklet.


Yet, why would an Owner's Manual instruct you on oil changes, chain tensioning, etc. If the Owner isn't suppose to do it?

If Ducati demands that all service must be done by Ducati, shouldn't it be included in the purchase price?

I strongly believe they can say what ever they want in the fine print. But that doesnt mean that legally they can void your warranty if you do it yourself.
 

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Old Wizard
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This is the only way they can get you if you change your own oil.

From the 2012 U.S. Streetfighter Owners Manual, page 7:

However, warranty does not apply to the motorcycles used in competitions or competitive trials or whenever poor maintenance status is ascertained.


This statement however appears to be an tie-in prohibited by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act:

From the 2012 U.S. Streetfighter Owners Manual, page 98:

Important
Engine oil and oil filters must be changed by a Ducati Dealer or authorized Service Center at the intervals specified in the scheduled maintenance table reported in the Warranty Booklet.


The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act prohibits tie-in sales provisions.

"Tie-In Sales" Provisions

Generally, tie-in sales provisions are not allowed. Such a provision would require a purchaser of the warranted product to buy an item or service from a particular company to use with the warranted product in order to be eligible to receive a remedy under the warranty. The following ia an example of a prohibited tie-in sales provision.

In order to keep your new Plenum Brand Vacuum Cleaner warranty in effect, you must use genuine Plenum Brand Filter Bags. Failure to have scheduled maintenance performed, at your expense, by the Great American Maintenance Company, Inc., voids this warranty.
 

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Just want to get the general consensus.

I know the first 600mi break-in oil change is important. But how important is it that my Ducati delaer perform it?

$350 for an oil change is just plain old ridiculous. But aside from the price, I have always changed the oil on my previous Japanese bikes.

How many of you forego the first dealer service and do it yourself? Is there something so critical that requires having the dealer perform it???

:confused:
Does the $350 include anything else or is it just an oil change??!
 

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My opinion is that it is best to have the dealer perform the first service as Ducati leaves many ECU upgrades as well as brake kits, etc., for the dealer to perform. I know that the cost seems high for an oil change; however, there are a number of other checks that the dealer is supposed to perform during this service. Also, it gives you an opportunity to have them make a record of any problems you mention should they require warranty work at a later time.
 

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Official Retired Person
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7,380 Posts
I have always considered dealer service work as the 'insurance premium' payments while the vehicle is under warranty. After the warranty period, I generally follow the manufacture's recommendations but perform a majority of the work myself and usually because I like doing it myself.
 

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It is just an oil change. You can do it just fine. There is nothing special or voodoo about it. If you need ECU updates or other service bulletins performs, this is all supposed to be at the expense of Ducati, not on the clock while performing the 600 service. From what I have seen, $350 is way high for a 600 mile service anyway. Call up a Ducati shop and speak to a tech. Kindly ask them to provide you with the 600 mile service check list. Other than changing the oil and checking the computer for errors, most of it is going over lights, side stand, etc. At $90+/hr, I'll do that sort of stuff myself.
 

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Two things.

First, I'm a big proponent of changing your oil and filter in the first 50-100 miles. Freshly built engines have an awful lot of metal floating around in them that is not washed out during the machining and assembly process, plus metal that comes off as pieces mate for the first time. Do an oil and filter change at 50-100 miles and if you cut open the filter or look at the oil you'll see quite a bit of metal. Getting this out of the engine sooner rather than later is a good idea.

Second, if you look at what the maintenance schedule specifies for the first maintenance, it is more than just an oil and filter change. You can do the inspections that are specified yourself, but unless you're a qualified tech, the lack of the inspection leaves some potential for warranty problems. If you want to save yourself some money. Buy an OEM oil filter from the dealer along with the recommended oil, mark the mileage that you do the first service oil change at and keep this for your records. Then have your dealer do the rest of the first service work.

In the case of my Panigale, The oil I changed at 75 miles was absolutely filthy with blow by and metal. The oil I changed at 623 miles was in decent shape. The inspection work is 1 to 1.5 hours by the book and I believe having the dealer do this work for the first service is cheap insurance.
 

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Old Wizard
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At 600 miles, the Manual maintenance schedule lists "Clean the engine oil intake filter" (oil screen filter.)

Engine oil screens aren’t in common use today but they do have a useful function.

First, they trap larger particles that are always left over from machining operations so you should expect to see some debris on the screens at the first few oil changes. So don’t be alarmed when you see it in the first couple of oli changes

Second, they’re a good indicator of engine health.

Oil filters will trap the same larger particles but unless you cut open your used oil filter each time and examine its entrails, you’ll never know about internal problems until it’s too late.

I think that it’s very important that screen be removed and inspected for debris at each oil change, not just at 600 miles.. Some dealers don't do it, explaining that the blockage to flow is small - so don’t worry. But even if it is checked, the early warning sign of particles collecting on the screen is often ignored. The most common rationale being that the filter screen captures particles of aluminum remaining from the machining process, so seeing them shouldn’t necessarily be cause for concern. At your first couple of oil changes this argument has merit, but if you see particles at subsequent changes you should investigate further.

In any event, change your own oil, or be there when it’s changed to see for yourself.


As most of you know by now, there are two problems common to Ducatis that can be identified by, and diagnosed by the particles they deposit on the filter screen.

The first problem is a design flaw in the pre-2000 model-year bikes that have an aluminum crankshaft oil gallery plug that can loosen and back-out. In doing so, the rotation of the crankshaft will machine the plug down until the plug eventually comes out and the engine experiences a catastrophic loss of oil pressure that destroys the main bearings (among other things.) The aluminum particles will end-up on the filter screen.

The second problem is the design problem with the chrome plating flaking-off the cam-contacting surface of the rocker arms. The sure way to know if you have rocker problems is to pull the cams and look, but your dealer won't do this unless you authorize an additional labor charge. Chrome particles on the filter screen will give you a good reason to spend the money to have them do this.

(Fine debris stuck to the magnet on the drain plug is from normal wear and no cause for concern. The most likely cause of small fingernail clipping-shaped particles on the drain plug magnet is normal transmission wear. Chrome and aluminum are non-magnetic so they don’t attach themselves to the magnet on the drain plug.)

So how do you tell which you have - chrome or aluminum particles on your filter screen? Here’s a simple test.

Draw a small amount of battery acid and put the particles in it. Battery acid is dilute sulfuric acid, so when you add chromium to it you’ll get a release of hydrogen bubbles and the chromium will turn the darker violet color of chromium sulfate. Aluminum doesn’t react this way.

For you chemistry majors:

2Cr + 3H2SO4 > Cr2 [SO4]3 + 3H2


So, if you do it, you get to see the early warning signs of transmission damage or the crank oil gallery plug backing out.
 

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The first service the dealers are supposed to check things over look at the brakes fluids etc.
I consider it an insurance policy...
Some forward thinking people get the first service dealt into the initial deal (Included)
I paid a lot less than $300 something like $100 -$160
What I hate is paying the tax on a mechanics wage.. up here it is 13% and the oil disposal fee and tax on it also...

Talk to your dealer To have a trained expert Mechanic "Catch" something is worth the money well spent.
I agree $300 + is expensive insurance...
 

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As others have stated, $300 is a bit pricey for a 600 mile check and oil change.

I'm fairly certain they do more than that at a 600 mile check. Along with a ECU check and any other service bulletins, they should check the lights, chain tension, bolt torque (wheels, calipers, frame/engine, swing arm .....), suspension, tires, fluid levels ..... and just look for any discrepancies. If it has fairings, it'll just add to their service time.

Ask them what 600 mile service is in detail and what it'll cost without an oil & filter change. Go buy a filter & oil from the dealer, save the receipt and change it yourself. Save any debris found on the screen filter. Show it to the dealer when it goes in for service. You save some money, they sell some oil and do some service, it a win-win/peace of mind on a new bike.
 

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I paid $220 for mine. And this is in Canada where the prices are usually higher than the US.
 
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