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Discussion Starter #1
I’m awaiting delivery of a Race Tech form spring compressor in a few days, purchased online after realizing I have a sleeve in my Showa fork obscuring the locknut first the top cap.

Question:
Do I need to screw in or back out any of the three adjusters on my 95 Supersport 900SS 41mm forks prior to the compression and top cap removal?

I am leaving the rod connected (not disconnecting from the bottom) but will install new sliders and bushings.

Thanks for your help!
 

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wind the rebound adjuster fully in and count the clicks. that is the setting it is at now. then wind it all the way out to make sure it's out of the way. you can also count the total number of clicks - should be 15 or so - and reset it to that when you reassemble. the preload adjuster can remain where it is - it doesn't get in the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much.

Leave preload and compression damping alone, wind rebound damper all the way out (after first determining current setting)

Roger that!
 

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i would wind the compression all the way out too while flushing. well, i usually pull the comrepssion adjusters out, but you need to be careful with them a little. make sure the adjuster is in a click, othwerwise you'll chew up the spring around it.

if they're really mucky inside get some naptha/shellite/white spirit and fill them with that and pump them up and down with adjusters open and fully closed. then let them hang upside down for some time.
 

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The first time is bewildering, don't be in a hurry so take the time to pump the cleaner as Belter says.The passages are very very tiny so easily clogged over time.
 

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The adjuster detent springs sometimes no longer move freely and need cleaning to click properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks to everybody for the helpful responses.

I have owned this bike since 2008. And these forks have never been serviced.

I managed to unscrew the top tube portion of one fork after removing it from the bike (that’s when I learned I would need a quality spring compressor and when I ordered the Race Tech product.)

I poured out that oil and was pleased that it still had a measure of translucency. But I noticed a dark, fine grit haze stuck to the slider and everything else.

So I was wondering how everything could get clean.

Naptha it is, while pumping the internal mechanism. Got it.

only now, I’m hearing everyone say that both of the clickable adjusters should be wound all the way out as well as all the way in while doing this pumping cleaning?
 

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only now, I’m hearing everyone say that both of the clickable adjusters should be wound all the way out as well as all the way in while doing this pumping cleaning?
if you close the adjusters it will force some of the solvent through the shim stacks better than if you have them open. and will them open it will flush the bypass circuits (which is what the adjusters are). it's just cleaning.
 

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If you find metal particles I would inspect the inside of the outer tube for anodizing wear marks
if you mark the tubes and fit them with the outers rotated 90 degrees that'll get you a fresh surface, but it is annoying. i have a set of forks that are the old goldy outer 41mm ones with lots of sun fading, so i might send them out for hard chrome just to see how black hard chrome actually is.
 

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Good trick (y) , I have tryed, but after few km the oil became dirty and the fork start loosing low speed damping.
Don't know is it was for the metal particles or for the silkolene that don't last too long...

It is somewhat common to see this type of wear on showa/ducati?

pneumadeux, if you find some wear i suggest to clean all the bits very well;);)
 

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ok, I was probably a little unlucky. Tipically how many km they will last?
The set on the pics has only 6000km and is the second.
The first last about 30000km.
On that set i had the fork service done by a local shop that probably didn't clean well, and also moved some of the hard metal particle around and into the lower bushing and seal.
As result after few km the particles embedded into the teflon of the lower bushing deeply scratched all the inner tube.
What a mess:eek::mad:

I'm not an expert. from my unlucky experience if i found a lot wear i would also clean and ispect the bushings
 

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dunno how long they last, it's not something i've looked at historically. possibly depends on a few things - oil change intervals or even type/brand, usage, etc. i would have thought the non sbk adjustable showa, with the rebound oil squirting out at the top would have lubed the inside of the tube to some extent.
 

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Too many variables to set a date. On oem forks w/ oem oil I use 18,000 miles as a good average as oil is usually just starting to break down by then. Bushing wear can be changed by many factors such as
poor materials.
poor fluid
excess loads - side loading like a long travel fork that stays in the most unsupported part of the range or is not easily telescoped due to rake of the bike.
Wrong springs and too much oil holding the travel to one small range so all the wear is concentrated to one spot instead of a larger range to take wear loads.

Fluid types are not all equal yes even good brands may make a fluid that does not hold up well. I have seen poor oils wear out in a fraction of the time another oil is fine with.
Heat is often a killer of fork oil so check your damping settings. If you restrict oil too much it creates a greater amount of heat that burns the fluid up and you wear it rapidly.

An example would be a Ohlins fork on a monster S4rs that had a rebound needle jammed closed from improper assembly at the factory. by 4000 miles the one leg that was normal had normal oil but the overly restricted leg had black/burnt oil. This would be no different if you closed off a rebound (or compression) adjuster .
 

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Thanks for the info.
For the fork i don't care about std setting, i set it to have a good damping and well balanced with the shocks. Oil level 120mm,
I used this set at 3 click on both comp and reb until it start fading, at the end of the season.
Then start to closing the register until i got 0 click and no enough damping.

When i open it i found black oil, worn anodizing, a lot of metal particle.
All of that with almost no wear on the bushings.

Maybe the anodizing finish in this forks is crap?

Ducvet, did you have an idea of the expected anodizing finishing mileage? You also find no damping loss running with bushing on bare aluminium?

I know i'm peaky :)
 

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keep in mind adjusters are counted from fully seated (clockwise turns) until stopped then counterclockwise counting up. If you are running with the damping mostly closed (3 is pretty closed off) that could burn the oil up as you are forcing the oil through a small hole which creates heat, smaller the hole the more heat. If you are counting from full out (counterclockwise) the 3 in should not be burning oil so I would look for something else maybe try a different brand oil.

When you mention anodizing what are you talking about ? Pictures may help. If you are talking about chrome or a color coating over chrome? or cosmetics?

Bushing wear does not usually create damping issues unless there is real binding which is another issue. Have you checked to see if the fork tube is bent?
 

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For anodizing i mean the shiny silver part on aluminium outer tube.
I dont know if it is proper anodize or other galvanic threatment.
If you look at the pics you can se a egg shaped wear patch were the upper bushing rubs the outer tube.
This set is 6000km old, no wear on bushing.
Straigth tube, axle and triple tree clamp
981958

I think that 3clicks out from fully closed (std is 6) with about 25cst oil is pretty common..
 

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those monster ie adj showa seem to have less rebound than the others, and with the maxima 5 (15cst) you can run the rebound adjuster all the way in, which then in turn stops the bypass of the compression circuit.

no idea why you have so much wear. i had some from an s4r and 998 apart this week with about 30k on both and they had much less than that. they are anodised, but anything other than the greyish - black of hard anodising is not hard as such.
 

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In the US there is a 2-3 year range if monsters 2000-2002 where there is a defect in the damper unit and it passes by oil on the low speed rebound. If sprung these units often do need the rebound adjuster wound in more than normal but that is because the oil has another less restrictive path somewhere.

This defect is not in any of the similar damper units I have ever seen from 1991-2006 superbike,monster,supersport,st series with the same design.

When running thinner oils say for better compression damping know that the thinner it is the faster the damping changes with wear. Nothing wrong with that but it will lead to more often changing of oil.

With the lower in the upper can you feel the play?
Where in the travel is the spot lining up with the upper bushing?
 
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