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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter #1
The needles on my gauges are faded to almost white. They're so bad that at a quick glance they're hard to see. Anyone know how to open the gauge face so the needles can be painted? I've searched the forum using a couple of different subject names and couldn't find anything. Thanks in advance.
 

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Mine did the opposite. The needle stayed red forever; but the numbers on the dial faded long before the end.

PhilB
 

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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter #6
I pulled the instrument panel off the bike then removed each of the gauges. Using a small flat tip screwdriver as gently as I could, I straightened the rolled edge of the bezel to get them off. As you can see in the pictures the edges did get a bit gouged up. I also broke the glass of the speedometer. I'll have to look for some thin enough polycarbonate to make my own. I searched the interwebs for replacement gauges, just in case. Found NOS on eBay for $800, way more than I care to spend. Next I'll paint the needles in place on the gauges then crimp the bezels back on. Not too worried about the gouged edges as they won't be seen.
 

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I used the same technique to remove the bezels on my Spitfire when I cleaned everything one of them. The marks don't show when you're done. Sorry about the lens/glass/cover. That didn't happen to me!

Looking good though.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
 
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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry about the lens/glass/cover. That didn't happen to me!

Looking good though.
I’m not too worried about it. If not polycarbonate then I’ll look for plexiglas to make my own lens.
 
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McMaster -Carr used to sell round glass that could be used in gauges. I don’t remember if you can get round plastic from them or not. Plastic is not the ideal material for these. I got something on a plastic gauge window and it fogged over.
 
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Señor Member
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Discussion Starter #10
Today I applied some modeling paint to the needles. For the cracked lens I had a local glass shop cut one for $10. What I did notice is the other two lenses seem to be a bit frosted compared to the new clear glass. Wondering if that’s done to cut glare? As you can see in my pictures, I had some help.
 

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Today I applied some modeling paint to the needles. For the cracked lens I had a local glass shop cut one for $10. What I did notice is the other two lenses seem to be a bit frosted compared to the new clear glass. Wondering if that’s done to cut glare? As you can see in my pictures, I had some help.
I like your progress. Show us a photo when ur finished.
I sure hope the paint that you chose is UV resilient!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Took my gauges out and re-painted the needles.


Fred
I like them in black but chose to go with a stock looking red. I notice on your speedo you can still see the 55mph and line. Mine is so faded you can barely see that.
 

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I like your progress. Show us a photo when ur finished.
I sure hope the paint that you chose is UV resilient!
Just waiting for the foam surround to come from Ducati Omaha to put it all back together. Might be another week or two as we leave for a week’s vacation this Friday.
 

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needles....

I,too, replaced the foam surround of the gauges.

Here is a tip to make the job much easier - cut the foam at a 45 degree angle on the sticky side around the warning lights and the outside edge, so the foam can fit into the space between the warning light block and the edge of the base plate. Make the bevel about 1/8" wide at its widest, a slight bit of sticky goes away, but the foam pad does not catch on the way past the warning light block. I used a utility knife blade, new, and sawed the foam. Pick off any pieces of foam from the sticky side. This method keeps the foam going straight up and down and not wedged, leaving gaps around the warning light block. Light press the foam down and make sure it sticks close to the outside edge.

Once it sticks, it is in place for good. No cuts on the side that you see when you are done.

Take your time and you will be happy with the results. No one will see the bevel you cut on the inside edges or the outside edges.

Be sure to clean the base plate with denatured alcohol to get the old sticky off before you start.

Good luck...

Fred - industrial design modelmaker in a previous life.
 
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If you can get some polycarbonate/acrylic discs, I would replace all lenses so they all look the same WRT reflectivity, glare, etc.

Over time, some plastic will craze, some will become translucent (and eventually opaque), and so on. If you keep the bike long enough, you may have to deal with some of these issues on a recurring basis. Small price to pay.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I,too, replaced the foam surround of the gauges.

Here is a tip to make the job much easier - cut the foam at a 45 degree angle on the sticky side around the warning lights and the outside edge, so the foam can fit into the space between the warning light block and the edge of the base plate. Make the bevel about 1/8" wide at its widest, a slight bit of sticky goes away, but the foam pad does not catch on the way past the warning light block. I used a utility knife blade, new, and sawed the foam. Pick off any pieces of foam from the sticky side. This method keeps the foam going straight up and down and not wedged, leaving gaps around the warning light block. Light press the foam down and make sure it sticks close to the outside edge.

Once it sticks, it is in place for good. No cuts on the side that you see when you are done.

Take your time and you will be happy with the results. No one will see the bevel you cut on the inside edges or the outside edges.

Be sure to clean the base plate with denatured alcohol to get the old sticky off before you start.

Good luck...

Fred - industrial design modelmaker in a previous life.
Thanks for the advice. I will give it a good look and test fit as well as trim as you recommend before putting it in place permanent.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you can get some polycarbonate/acrylic discs, I would replace all lenses so they all look the same WRT reflectivity, glare, etc.

Over time, some plastic will craze, some will become translucent (and eventually opaque), and so on. If you keep the bike long enough, you may have to deal with some of these issues on a recurring basis. Small price to pay.
As I stated, I used real glass on the speedo. Only up close can the difference in the glass is noticeable.

As for ever replacing it again, the bike is 22 years old and I’m 63, pretty good chance I’ll never have to do this again.
 
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