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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just started tearing down the fork on my 2011 EVO SP I picked up earlier this year because the spring rates are wonky. I weight 142lbs in street clothes, so when I got the bike I expected the front spring rate to be almost perfect but the back to be 1-2 rates too stiff. What I have is a bike that someone put a #24 rear spring on which gives a rate of 8.15kg. I get nearly perfect sag in the rear. However, I only managed 36-39mm in the front for sag when it should be around 52-55mm in street clothes. This created a really sketchy ride as the front was around 20-25mm taller than it should be.

Now, I assumed someone also put stiffer rate fork springs in the front...who knows why...since everything I read says they're around .66kg/mm progressive. When I tore the fork down it looks like a stock spring as it has no markings on it. But the gap between the windings it pretty consistent bottom to top so it could be aftermarket. Anyone know what the stock spring on an EVO SP looks like?
 

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Sorry, not sure what the stock looks like , but you already know it's the wrong one for you. I have the same situation on my S4RS. I removed all preload and still can't get to minimum sag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I measured again this morning and it is progressively wound. Coil gap goes from 14 down to 9 at the top. My main concerns are these forks need custom springs made when you order them and with needing more sag than conventional/not being a super popular bike/model...getting the right springs. I know some companies are a little flacky about returning custom springs even when it's their error on specing the wrong ones for you. I'll probably measure the rate myself before I order a new set.
 

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You can always raise the fork tubes in the clamps to keep the geometry consistent. A stiffer fork spring isnt necessarily bad as it will help prevent brake dive. Also, as much as people complain about progressive springs, they can be great for small bump compliance without bottoming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I think I'm going to cheap out and try something else first. I measured 16mm of preload on the fork spring with the stock spacer. I'm going to put the spacer in the lathe and drop that down to 10mm. Then I'll raise the forks 8mm in the clamps. That will get me to my desired ride height in the front. I'll see how that rides for a couple of weeks.

On a side note, I have no idea why Marzocchi crimped the damper tube so you can't pull out the compression valve or rebound valve/damper rod. It's beyond silly. You put a peen or two on the ends like Showa/KYB do if you're that worried about it. That way it can still be ground off and the valving can be changed/repairs can be made. Marzocchi is such a third rate company and I have no idea why their stuff comes on a $14k bike. Seriously, the open damper on these forks is worse than a 1993 MX bike.
 
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