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I haven't met any 90's SS-owner who is happy with ethanol in the fuel for his bike.

Everybody knows the stories (rumours?) about ethanol: it ruins your fuel lines, it blows up (plastic) fuel tanks, it attracts water and makes your steel fuel tank corrode from the inside out, it clogs your jets,...

I've always thought (and many others do apparently think the same) that all fuel contains ethanol these days. But that's not true. Anyway, in Europe, that's not true. I can't speak for the US, Canada, Australia,....

In Europe there's a choice between E5 (the former 98RON) and E10 (former 95RON).
E5 means the fuel may contain up to max 5% ethanol, E10 up to max 10% ethanol. The important word here is 'may'. There are E5-fuels that contain no ethanol. And that's legal (again; I'm talking about Europe, or at least certain European countries).

The problem is that it's not easy to find out which fuels have 0% ethanol. Ethanol in fuel is concidered to be CO2-neutral and the use of ethanol is therefor a 'good thing' when talking ecological.
So for a major company advertising with ethanol-free fuel is not really good marketing these days.

But if you start to dig deep into their websites, email them,... you'll find out that some of them (quietly) don't add ethanol to certain fuels.

Here's a list of brands and countries that I found. Note that I'm not associated with any of these companies. My list is purely informative.

Ethanol free fuels in:

Belgium:
-Shell V-Power (also in the Netherlands, Luxembourg, Austria, Swiss but NOT in France)
-BP Ultimate
-Total Excellium Super Plus

Netherlands:
Same as Belgium plus
-Firezone Competition 102 (sold in Germany as Aral Competition 102)

Do you know any of these ethanol-free suppliers in your country? Add them to the list! Any corrections, remarks, thoughts,... GO!!!
 

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... Ethanol in fuel is concidered to be CO2-neutral and the use of ethanol is therefor a 'good thing' when talking ecological.
Ethanol itself is "considered Co2 neutral" ... but not gasoline with Ethanol in it. Just to be clear. So diluting gasoline with ethanol is supposed to comply with some climate change fighting standards and makes people have a warm/fuzzy feeling in the belly. Whitewash, say I.

The use of StaBil 360 Marine has been highly recommended to me from a very trusted source. It is a completely different formula than Red StaBil. 360 Marine creates a vapor that coats the innards of carbs, fuel tanks, and fuel lines which protects those surfaces from the water that Ethanol attracts and builds up in the fuel system. A half ounce per tankful is all that is required.

LINK = https://www.goldeagle.com/product/sta-bil-360-marine/


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Here in Florida a few years ago the Governor signed a bill that did not require gas stations to sell fuel with ethanol, & we do have stations that sell ethanol free fuel. Also Marina's all have ethanol free fuel as it is a bad thing in boats. My shop backs up to a municipal airport--this is where I purchase all of my fuel-100 octane low lead aviation fuel--All Aviation fuel is ethanol free-yes it costs a bit more BUT it does not go south nearly as fast-I keep and use it for about 1 year. So if your someone who rides on weekends day trips etc the Aviation fuel may be a good idea for you--especially if you store your bikes for months during the winter, plus the 100 octane your bike will be really happy.
 

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I do know know the name of it but I have had multiple customers who have used a phone app that maps local fuel stations in your area that sell non-ethanol fuel. I am not sure if this helps or how accurate it is but between a list that you are building and such an app owners can decide how reasonable it will be to jet for and run a type of fuel.
 

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Here in Florida a few years ago the Governor signed a bill that did not require gas stations to sell fuel with ethanol, & we do have stations that sell ethanol free fuel. Also Marina's all have ethanol free fuel as it is a bad thing in boats. My shop backs up to a municipal airport--this is where I purchase all of my fuel-100 octane low lead aviation fuel--All Aviation fuel is ethanol free-yes it costs a bit more BUT it does not go south nearly as fast-I keep and use it for about 1 year. So if your someone who rides on weekends day trips etc the Aviation fuel may be a good idea for you--especially if you store your bikes for months during the winter, plus the 100 octane your bike will be really happy.
I agree with some of your reasons to use avgas but why would the 100 octane make your bike "really happy?" A lot of bikes will run worse on 100 octane and you'll have a fair amount of issues as a result.

And should be noted: if you have a newer bike equipped with any kind of emissions equipment, you can't run avgas and if you have no emissions but do have any kind of 02 sensors you should be very careful and diligent if you use it.
 

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Here in East TN there are plenty of gas stations that sell non-ethanol gas. It usually costs about 50cents more a gallon
 

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The use of StaBil 360 Marine has been highly recommended to me from a very trusted source. It is a completely different formula than Red StaBil. 360 Marine creates a vapor that coats the innards of carbs, fuel tanks, and fuel lines which protects those surfaces from the water that Ethanol attracts and builds up in the fuel system. A half ounce per tankful is all that is required.

LINK = https://www.goldeagle.com/product/sta-bil-360-marine/


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This is good to know. I've been using the red StaBil forever, but on a whim, and based on things I have heard, I picked up some 360 last time I was at the auto parts store. I guess I should start using it. :grin2:
 

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I agree with some of your reasons to use avgas but why would the 100 octane make your bike "really happy?" A lot of bikes will run worse on 100 octane and you'll have a fair amount of issues as a result.

And should be noted: if you have a newer bike equipped with any kind of emissions equipment, you can't run avgas and if you have no emissions but do have any kind of 02 sensors you should be very careful and diligent if you use it.
Well looking at the person that started the thread he rides a 97 900SS I am assuming it is a carby--as is my 91 900ss--So I am speaking about bikes with carbs--and the avgas works perfect in these bike's--I am guessing he was not about an injected bike and I know I was not talking about an injected bike-so all the O2 sensor and other b/s in moot there are no O2 sensors, cat's etc involved
 

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Well looking at the person that started the thread he rides a 97 900SS I am assuming it is a carby--as is my 91 900ss--So I am speaking about bikes with carbs--and the avgas works perfect in these bike's--I am guessing he was not about an injected bike and I know I was not talking about an injected bike-so all the O2 sensor and other b/s in moot there are no O2 sensors, cat's etc involved
Well, a stock 900SS doesn't like 100 octane fuel. They seem to have the best and most complete combustion on 89-91 but I'll let an expert like @ducvet chime in. I can tell you that 100 on a stock super sport will cause some valve issues because of incomplete combustion and have some other not so super effects as well.

So that's why I'm curious that you said your bike will be really happy on 100 octane. I'm trying to figure out what I'm missing here.
 

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I am always looking at fuels with a few criteria.

1. Does the motor detonate with the fuel?
If yes you may need higher octane (or at least figure out why because there are other causes).

2. Does it help the motor to make power?
Many times people fall for marketing and over octane a motor increasing additives they do not need and reducing the amount of power potential in a equal amount of fuel. I can not tell you the number of times I have seen a lower octane fuel make more power, I do not remember ever seen a higher octane fuel (pump not race,boutique or AV gas) make more power only allowing a higher compression that then makes more power. Stock-no, modified = different story.

3. Does it burn clean
Does using the fuel leave deposits that are going to negatively effect detonation,power or driveability. I have seen plenty of bikes with soot buildup on the valves and pistons so bad you would think you were burning coal. I have seen a number also that are leaving a very hard white "crust" that could pass for concrete, this is most likely a additive either in the fuel bought or added but is not a benefit.

None of these 3 touch on the other issues like longevity, some fuels work just fine but will struggle to last 6 months without turning bad others have a very good shelf life. Others have been seen to erode the aluminum in the ports themselves and others as mentioned attack plastics,and o-rings .

In a perfect world we would run a fuel that is close to the octane we NEED and as much power potential as the given volume can give. This miracle fuel would not harm plastics or seals and would last years without stabilizers. Might as well give it a little added ability to leave a protective coating on valve seats and valves to prevent corrosion build up and try and make none of it toxic while you are at it.

Problem is I do not think this works in most cases for enough people and this is why we have so many variations. What works for one situation does not for another so it is left to us to figure out what is best. I have seen plenty of bikes detonated to death because the owner did not recognize what the noise was that is melting pistons so are you safer with high octane? probably.

Are you giving up some power running high octane? possibly.
Are you risking chemical build up in the motor running premium,avgas or additives you add? sure.
Can any of these cause other issues? 100% yes

simply know that there is seldom a magic bullet (or fuel) so figure out works best for your bike and keep an eye out for issues pointing to problems due to the fuel you have chosen.
 

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My personal experience with fuel comes more from Marine applications.
I have seen many cases where small outboards will barely idle let alone preform well using premium fuel.These engines are not high compression engines and do not have the spark advance to support higher octane fuels.The recommended fuel for the Mercury Optimax is also regular unleaded.
One of the problems with ethanol fuel is phase seperation(I believe this was mentioned earlier),do to long term storage and the fact that your fuel tank is vented to the atmosphere.There fore air goes in,air goes out bringing with it moisture that eventually the ethanol,can no longer absorb.
The solution is add ethanol fuel as needed and use a good stabilizer such as Stabil Marine,Startron,OMC 2+4,Mercury Quichstor,and Starbrite EZ Stor etc.We have very few problems with ethanol as long as it treated properly,including long term storage with built in fuel tanks.
My SS I used regular unleaded until I put high compression pistons in it.Now it is strictly premium fuel.I will fuel up at single dispenser pumps as I want to ensure that I get only premium fuel,not the 10 liters are so of fuel that is in the hose from the fellow that fueled with regular unleaded in front of me.
As Ducvet mentioned you will end up with carbon deposits etc using premium in an engine that dosen't require it.You will probably also notice a decrease in power,plus an increase in fuel consumption.
Use what works for you
 

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Putting my 5c worth in...
As my bike is a one-owner I know it's full history. I bought it new in the UK, and it was run-in on 98 octane pump gas, then the next 14,000kms around Europe, the IOM, and Scotland it was fuelled on 98 when available, or the highest octane available otherwise. Same once I shipped it to NZ - running 98 octane pump gas when available (but only if it's non-ethanol) - but not so often, as the nearest pump is about 180kms away :( - otherwise it's 95 (regular is 91 here). Note that the UK and NZ (and prolly Aus) use a different octane rating standard then the US. Performance seems fine, and I get 50-55 miles per US gallon, cruising at 100-120 kph. And it's got 76,000kms up, with nearly 50,000kms on the current rings - and it wasn't particularly carboned up when I pulled it apart (for broken studs - which ended up with new rings needed after breaking an oil ring) at ~28,000kms. So in conclusion: That's what works for me - others mileage may vary.

Hmmm - thinking about it - I vaguely recall being told by the dealers mechanic to run high octane gas to reduce the carb icing problems - or use an additive to boost the octane - which did help with reducing the icing problems. Of course, that's not a problem with the FCR's.

As ducvet said, "there is seldom a magic bullet (or fuel) so figure out what works best for your bike and keep an eye out for issues pointing to problems due to the fuel you have chosen."

Lol - I've ALWAYS got my eye out for issues and problems... Part of the joys of owning a 23 yo bike.
 
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Ethanol free is not available at all in my area

*900SS/SP 24 year old, 35,000 miles on the clock, absolutely stock engine
*using 87 octane ethanol with Stabil 360 additive consistently
*recently ditched the Factory Pro jet kit returning to absolutely, as delivered factory stock jetting, needles and slide return springs....37.5 pilot jets...coupled with synch and carefully set pilot screws
*runs fine, 50MPG , instant start at touch of the button, am not compelled to make any further changes
 

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Stock mufflers, stock air filter, stock air box ? What made you switch the jetting back ?
 

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Putting my 5c worth in...
As my bike is a one-owner I know it's full history. I bought it new in the UK, and it was run-in on 98 octane pump gas, then the next 14,000kms around Europe, the IOM, and Scotland it was fuelled on 98 when available, or the highest octane available otherwise. Same once I shipped it to NZ - running 98 octane pump gas when available (but only if it's non-ethanol) - but not so often, as the nearest pump is about 180kms away :( - otherwise it's 95 (regular is 91 here). Note that the UK and NZ (and prolly Aus) use a different octane rating standard then the US. Performance seems fine, and I get 50-55 miles per US gallon, cruising at 100-120 kph. And it's got 76,000kms up, with nearly 50,000kms on the current rings - and it wasn't particularly carboned up when I pulled it apart (for broken studs - which ended up with new rings needed after breaking an oil ring) at ~28,000kms. So in conclusion: That's what works for me - others mileage may vary.

Hmmm - thinking about it - I vaguely recall being told by the dealers mechanic to run high octane gas to reduce the carb icing problems - or use an additive to boost the octane - which did help with reducing the icing problems. Of course, that's not a problem with the FCR's.

As ducvet said, "there is seldom a magic bullet (or fuel) so figure out what works best for your bike and keep an eye out for issues pointing to problems due to the fuel you have chosen."

Lol - I've ALWAYS got my eye out for issues and problems... Part of the joys of owning a 23 yo bike.
As noted, your octane rating is very different that what we have here. Here's a note:

In Europe, the octane rating on the pump is simply the RON figure. America, by contrast, uses the average of the RON and the MON figures, called the AKI (anti-knock index). Thus, 97 octane “super unleaded” in Britain is roughly equivalent to 91 octane premium in the United States
 
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Stock mufflers, stock air filter, stock air box ? What made you switch the jetting back ?
Nothing radical in setup... upswept GPR slip on silencers with supplied "db killers" intact, K&N drop in filter, stock airbox with unmolested standard cover. Above and beyond stock jetting, I did take great care to find the "sweet spot" on each pilot screw setting.

Why? Convenience and experimentation....I've got multiple Mikuni carb sets...can make changes in advance on the bench and simply swap the sets in and out when convenient. Its fairly efficient. I'm attempting to maximize MPG while delivering trouble free performance.
 

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In the late 90's Ducati was sending the 750 monsters with adjustable stock needles, Bruce Meyers was a fan of using those where possible for customers who simply added slip ons and was not on a hunt for power. My own testing back then was that they did allow the bike to tune needle height so driveability was improved but the shape of the stock needle did not equal the open throttle power of aftermarket needles.

If you are looking to keep a bike close to stock but tuneable these might work for you. I do not have access to my notes right now to give you base diameter but that might be worth researching first. I do feel that the stock needles will probably wear the needle jets the least as they are almost as fat at the point as the base.
 
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