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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a new one, model ESR515, for my 1997 SS/CR. Supposed to plug right into the wiring harness. Be aware, it doesn't. Male plugs to alternator females way too small, won't stay in. Male plug on power line to battery way too small, no way it will fit into the female end from the battery.

I'll solder the connections tomorrow after I buy some more heatshrink tubing; tight quarters but no biggie. But anyone buying on the premise that it's plug-and-play should understand, it ain't.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
In retrospect, yes, although there'd still be three connections to solder since none of them fit.
 

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In retrospect, yes, although there'd still be three connections to solder since none of them fit.
I think soldering is the better option and is what I chose to do. Too many of those connections become corroded and cause the R/R or stator to fail. I snipped the ends and soldered them directly to the leads from the stator. It will make maintenance in the future more complicated though. I chose the ESR510 for the direct to battery charging, and bypassing the 25 year old harness completely.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well it's wired and working - sort of. 13.3V resting voltage (LiFePo battery). About 14.4 idling - and stays at that voltage regardless of RPMs.... not used to this sort of result.
 

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Electrosport is a good outfit and their product has been bullet-proof for us.

So, going forward here is the schema for the newer riders (who have yet to hassle with a reg) -

OEM and many aftermarket regulators use bipolar transistors (although Ducati is now shipping the new bikes with MOSFET regs).

Bipolar transistors waste energy as heat as they never really turn all the way off. A MOSFET is a type of transistor that does turn all the way off and so they run cooler and the energy that was being wasted as heat is available for the system.

That is why they have a higher charge rate at idle.

They generally free up about 50 watts, so on an older bike that has a lower output alternator, you can "find" 50 watts by upgrading to a MOSFET design. That is really the only way to get extra energy into the system. Many older bikes had 300-350 watt systems and many newer bikes come with 700 watt systems. So, if you have added a lot of accessories that might be something to think about.

3 yellow wires out of the alternator case = 3-phase. You need a 3-phase regulator to get the full output.

2 yellow wires coming out of the alternator case = single-phase. You can use either a single-phase or a 3-phase regulator. If it is a 3-phase reg you just use any 2 of the 3 yellow inputs and ignore the 3rd. Nothing bad will happen and it will give you whatever output is coming out of the alternator.

If you are the type to plan ahead and are planning a tour or just a longer trip away from home it is a good step to buy a new reg (while the OEM is still working) and install the new one. Convert any connections to be universal between the 2 regs. Then pack the OEM (and any tools needed to get at it) along as a backup.

HTH.

M./
 
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Discussion Starter #12
I was more than a little peeved that the Electrosport reg/rec advertised as plug-and-play was not. Having said which, it's installed and outputting 14.4-.5V from idle to (as near as I've dared come while revving in neutral) redline is pretty impressive. So overall I'm not unhappy with my purchase.
 

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I was more than a little peeved that the Electrosport reg/rec advertised as plug-and-play was not. Having said which, it's installed and outputting 14.4-.5V from idle to (as near as I've dared come while revving in neutral) redline is pretty impressive. So overall I'm not unhappy with my purchase.
Well, they were right and they were wrong.

That reg does plug&play on the 907IE and a few other bikes of that era.

But Ducati changed everything all the time in that time-frame so the only way to know when things started/stopped and changed is to get feedback from the end-user. There is no documentation anywhere, not at Ducati, not anywhere.

They have 3 Diavel models all with the battery down in the lower front of the bike. The starter is in the same place on all 3 and the ground point is in the same place on all 3. Do you think they would all take the same starter circuit kit?

Well, you would be wrong. They have 3 slightly different layouts each with a different combination of specialized battery terminals. Why? Because why not 😀 ?

Anyway, very glad you were able to get it sorted out and that you have the positive attitude. It's really needed these days.
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The best social distancing is riding your motorcycle!

Ride Safe & Stay Safe!
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M./
 

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I can second that a 3-phase RR does work on a 2 wire (single-phase) stator. I used one on an older Moto Guzzi, and it solved its charging issue. (OEM RR gave me 12.5V, not good enough for an AGM battery. Replacement 3 ph. unit on the single phase stator brought it to 14V.)
 

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Some useful info -

When you start your bike, the high current flow depletes the battery's storage of current potential and it needs to be charged back up while you ride.

Here's the lowdown on charging voltages -

On all lead-acid batteries, you have to overcome some "overhead" in the chemical process and that means you have to be above about 13.2 V. Below that you are just treading water and not really charging the battery back up. That voltage will probably run the bike but then when you park, it will be in a discharged state.

With AGM+ like an Odyssey or the top-tier Yuasa, they need more like 13.6 V minimum and they actually last much longer if they are charged at a quite high voltage (up past 14.5+).

LiFePO4 batteries also need 13.2 or more and they are much more easily recharged. They will recharge in a few blocks whereas the lead-acid tech might take 20 miles of riding.

None of them want to see more than 14.7 V and most MC regs are configured to top out at that voltage.

They are all okay with up to 15.0 V but after 14.9 V you are starting to reduce the life of the battery. Above 15.2 V you are damaging the battery but it might be months or years before you see the degradation. The degradation results in a shortened lifespan. A battery that would have lasted 5 years tanks in 3, a battery that would have lasted 3 years tanks in 15 months. That kind of thing.

Gel cell batteries were the first sealed type and BMW used them and so others started to also install them in their bikes. But BMW also supplied a voltage regulator that topped out at 14.4 V (or close to it).

All batteries have a "gassing" state where they emit explosive gas. That's why there was always the notice to keep sparks away from any charging wet-cell batteries.

An AGM is a sealed lead-acid battery with a one-way valve. They are actually called valve-regulated batteries. If the gassing voltage is exceeded the gas exits the one-way valve.

On Gel-cells when the gassing voltage is exceeded (14.4 V) the gassing forms bubbles in the gel and that causes a loss of capability and the batteries degrade in a short time (12 months erc.)

So, don't buy a true Gel-cell or a wet-cell, get an AGM.

How do I know about Gel-cells? I ate through 2 of them, 1 right after another in the 1998-99 timeframe. The OEM Ducati regulators go to 14.7 and that caused the gas pockets to form and it was downhill from there.

HTH.

M./

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The best social distancing is riding your motorcycle!

Ride Safe & Stay Safe!
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Some good reading :)
I'm contemplating going lithium on my next battery for the Superlight and new I'd better upgrade my regulator.
Seeing there's options allowing straight to the battery connection is a nice find.
 

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I can second that a 3-phase RR does work on a 2 wire (single-phase) stator. I used one on an older Moto Guzzi, and it solved its charging issue. (OEM RR gave me 12.5V, not good enough for an AGM battery. Replacement 3 ph. unit on the single phase stator brought it to 14V.)
which model guzzi?
 

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Bipolar transistors waste energy as heat as they never really turn all the way off. A MOSFET is a type of transistor that does turn all the way off and so they run cooler and the energy that was being wasted as heat is available for the system.
what happens to the alternator output when the mosfet open? does the output ac just become potential and just wait for more draw? that's the part i don't get about the mosfet.
 

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I think it wise to point out that most 2nd generation Lithium batteries commonly include on-board voltage protection circuitry which provides over-current protection and under-voltage shut off.

Shorai are the most popular brand, but they are old school and don't have any sort of voltage protection, they are extremely susceptable to overvoltage damage and also capable of killing the battery from draining it too far. Those with the voltage protection built in will also commonly allow you to use an off-the-shelf battery tender, will "disconnect" the battery internally if voltage drops below a threshold (11.2v maybe?) and disconnect when exposed to voltage past 14.9 or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
DME3, I would suggest you do just that. My old reg/rec fried a brand new $229 EarthX LiFePo4 battery in 3/4 of a mile of mid-RPM range riding... it was like blowing a main fuse. Running/not running, no lights, nothing.
 
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