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What is the difference between the stock ECU, the ECU that comes with the Termi Slip ons and the ECU that comes with the full Termi race kit exhaust.

I ask because several people who are interested in buying my slip-ons want to know if they (slip ons) will work with the stock ECU. I never had the stock exhaust or ECU so I cant tell what if anything was eliminated with the slip-ons. I know with my 1098 the "flapper valve" removal was a big advantage for the full race ECU as opposed to the slip-on ECU...

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
AAron
 

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The stock ECU is "closed loop." This means it not only takes current factors into consideration (rpm, load, temperature, etc.), but then it looks at the result of it's map by checking the oxygen sensor's data to see what the actual results are of it's mapping decisions. It then averages those results and develops an "improved" map. This checking of itself and readjusting the map is continuous.

The DP ECU's are "open loop." This means that they take current factors into consideration, and then choose an amount of fuel according to the map in their brain. They never look at any exhaust info to see the results of their choice. Open loop systems usually have the ability to have their maps adjusted by an external computer.

Catalytic converters are very delicate and can be destroyed by the wrong mixture, so closed loop systems are necessary for CAT's. CAT's also require leaner mixtures that often do not provide the best performance and running characteristics. So, although an open loop ECU could provide maximum performance, they usually do not. Closed loop ECU's normally are non-adjustable to prevent tampering that could ruin the CAT.

The stock ECU is limited in how far it can adjust to changes in data. Thus, the freer flowing intake and exhaust of the DP cans will result in the engine being much too lean if used with the stock ECU.


So that answers part of your question, but I don't know if the maps for the DP ECU's provided for the two different Termi systems have differences or not. Hopefully someone else here can give you that information. They may have different maps, but they function identically.
 

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the dp kit ecu for slip ons and 2-1 was the same part number for the single shock bikes at least.
Are you saying that the stock ECU and the slip on ECU have the same part numbers? Not the ones that I have.
 

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I ask because several people who are interested in buying my slip-ons want to know if they (slip ons) will work with the stock ECU.
When I got mine, I installed the slip-ons first, but didn't have time to put in the ECU before dark. So I rode with slip-ons and stock ECU out to a local bike night. It was terrible, damn near unrideable. It back fired like an automatic weapon. DP ECU went in the next day. However, others have used slip-ons with the stock ECU and reported no problems. It's also worth noting that there at least two different stock ECUs in use out there. A lot of bikes where fitted with the Euro ECU to fix certain issues and those seem to run a bit richer and work better with aftermarket exhaust.

If they want to run the slip-ons with a stock ECU, the Fat-Duc is a simple inexpensive solution that lots of owners on this forum seem very happy with. Motowheels also sells a reflash kit for the stock ECU. Considerably more, but still cheaper than the DP ECU and with more adjustability.
 

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From what I can see, the stock ECU and the DP ECU on the '08 biposto are both 5AM units, but with different programming. I hope so, as I've ordered a VDST with the intention of working on both bikes. Getting confirmation of this has been quite difficult, any light shed would be appreciated..
 

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From what I can see, the stock ECU and the DP ECU on the '08 biposto are both 5AM units, but with different programming. I hope so, as I've ordered a VDST with the intention of working on both bikes. Getting confirmation of this has been quite difficult, any light shed would be appreciated..
I have the VDST and have tried it on both ECUs - mine (DP) and a buddy's stock. You won't be able to adjust the trim on the stock ECU, but can read/reset error codes, look at all the sensor readings (temp, rpm, throttle position, etc.), and reset the TPS. On the DP ECU you can adjust the fuel trim.
 

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On the DP ECU you can adjust the fuel trim ???

I have the VDST and have tried it on both ECUs - mine (DP) and a buddy's stock. You won't be able to adjust the trim on the stock ECU, but can read/reset error codes, look at all the sensor readings (temp, rpm, throttle position, etc.), and reset the TPS. On the DP ECU you can adjust the fuel trim.
What do you mean when you say you can adjust fuel trim on the DP ECU?

Given people on the forum are still using PCIII's with their ECU, the fuel trim you are talking about must be different to what the PCIII does.

Thanks

Rob
 

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What do you mean when you say you can adjust fuel trim on the DP ECU?

Given people on the forum are still using PCIII's with their ECU, the fuel trim you are talking about must be different to what the PCIII does.

Thanks

Rob
Yeah, different. The DP ECU gives you some control over the idle fuel mixture (which also seems to affect the mixture higher in the rev band as well...). This is how they can tune it to get rid of backfiring and popping with the termi pipes, and also why some people seem to think the DP ECU runs rich, while others have found them to be lean...they need to be tuned. The PCIII allows much more control and fine tuning of the fuel mixture at various throttle positions and RPM, thus why you really need to have a custom "map" made on a dyno to get the best performance gains and rideability. Every bike is different, even the same models side by side right off the assembly line and each will require slightly different tuning to run correctly.
 

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Thanks for the clarification Dietrich.

It sounds like it is definitely worthwhile getting the idle fuel mixture done before getting a PCIII fitted and mapped.

Rob
 

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Thanks for the clarification Dietrich.

It sounds like it is definitely worthwhile getting the idle fuel mixture done before getting a PCIII fitted and mapped.

Rob
Definitely true!

I did the whole basic tune-up (valves, TPS, TB sync, and mixture trim adjustment) and that cleared up the stalling issue. The PC III resolved the roll-off backfiring and crappy dirveability below 4000RPM.

Just be sure to get the USB model of the PC III and not the EX model, if you can. That gets you tunability below 3000 RPM.
 
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