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Discussion Starter #1
What do you guys use for the eccentric nut to set tension on the belts?
 

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A regular wrench. Open on one end, box on the other. With its slight offset, the box end works perfect. I set the lock nuts with just enough tension so the eccentric stays put, but I can still move it with a bit of force. After tension is set, I lock the nut down. You need to hold the eccentric with the box wrench while tightening the lock nut.

There is a tool for this, but I don't own one.
 

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What I thought although the price for a single 22mm wrench would maybe be same as the tool but thats the way I will go also. Where would be the best place to get the cam pulley lock and castle nut socket and what method do you use for tensioning the belts Dan? Need to find a couple of curved forceps also.
Thanks
 

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What I thought although the price for a single 22mm wrench would maybe be same as the tool but thats the way I will go also. Where would be the best place to get the cam pulley lock and castle nut socket and what method do you use for tensioning the belts Dan? Need to find a couple of curved forceps also.
Thanks
I'd go to Harbor Freight and the get cheapest 22MM wrench you can find. There is no real torque placed on it. I already have a full set of wrenches beyond 22MM, so it was easy enough. I have older (as in actually made in the USA) Craftsman stuff, but for this you can really go cheap.

The question I have regarding cam lock and castle nut socket is why do you need it??? If you are just doing belts and valve check, you do not need to mess with the pulley nuts. BUT! I personally check them for tightness after an early problem I had years ago with one nut being loose and backing out. I check them for tightness. That being said, I have never found one loose again. My issue was very likely an assembly problem from the factory. Friday after siesta kind of problem... If you want to do that, kits are all over eBay for little money. I like the quality of stuff I've bought from HDESA (search Ducati tools) on eBay.

You can probably find forceps at Harbor Freight too. I don't use them. I just move the piston of the cylinder I am working on up high enough so the valve doesn't drop, but I can still get the closing shim off. You will have the belts off for this, and there is absolutely NO good reason to even start this if you're not planning to take the belts off even just to check, so it's easy to move the piston without upsetting cam position. You just need to remember to move the piston back down before you rotate the cam fully.

I have been using the frequency method for a while. It works, it's easy and it's repeatable. Many smart phone apps out there for this. Guitar tuners and even actual belt tension tools. I have used Tension2go and Smart Tension with good results. I also found and app for I Phone called Fine Tuner that displays actual frequency. Haven't tried it yet, but it looks good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Dan, was just going by what was mentioned in the manual by LT.
 

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So I will take the belts off after aligning all the marks which will be comp tdc on the horizontal cylinder. Then can turn the engine just enough to get the piston to the top on vert cyl. But need to remember to turn the engine back the same way so I'm not off by 180 degrees or whatever that would be. I don't understand why LT doesn't mention thus instead of using the forceps. Also shows needing the cam lock to put the very belt on also? Thus is what confuses me, or maybe a st4s is different as is with the oil line we need to remove from the rocker pin side cover.
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So a little explanation...

Nothing wrong with doing it the way outlined in LT's book. He is a guy who has put together a series of very useful guides to help us DIY'ers. His methods and advice are based on his years of experience and interpretation of the recommended procedures published by the manufacturer. There are many ways to skin a cat, however.

Some recommend removing everything and placing each part in labeled plastic dividers. Some say it's best to remove the heads. Some say pull the cams, some say it's not needed.

For me, I do it the way that I do it. It's nothing unique, it just differs in some ways from others.

To address a few of your specific questions.

I remove the belts. No real need to line up the timing marks with the horizontal at TDC to do that, unless you want to mark the belts with paint dots for easier re installation. Once the belts are off, the valves will all be closed and you are free to move the crank and pistons as you like. You are completely free to move the crank and cams independently as you like, as long as you don't try to turn a cam with a piston towards the top. You do not need to give any thought to timing marks at all until you reinstall the belts. If I have to pull a closer shim to change it, I move that cylinder's piston up enough to prevent the valve from dropping, but not so high that it's hard to maneuver the valve for easy shim removal. No way to explain how high is enough, you have to try it. I say remember to drive the piston back down before you rotate the cam because after you reinstall the shims and have the cam back in, you really need to spin the cam a few times to seat everything before taking another measurement to see that you now have a correct valve lash. If the piston is high enough, you will find binding as the piston and valves try to occupy the same space. No real bother, you still have the belts off and are GENTLY moving the cam by hand. No damage will result unless you really try to force it. You can use forceps, I have early on, I just find it another tool to keep track of and it's a bit fussy to get them in there. Your choice.

The only time i will ever remove the oil line side rocker pin cover is if I need to replace a rocker on that side. Otherwise, it stays on. You can replace all the shims and remove the cams with that rocker cover in place. I remove the belt side rocker pin cover to access everything I need except the far side rockers, as mentioned.

We are talking about a different cam lock... I was discussing the tool used to lock the cam wheels so you can use a castle nut socket for the purpose of removing that nut allowing you to get cam pulley off the cam. This is not the same cam lock needed to put the belts on. Again, this is a tool I do not have, it's fussy, but it can be done without it. It is a useful and inexpensive tool that is only used on the vertical head for belt installation. When you put the belts on, the horizontal is at TDC compression. All valves are closed and off the cam lobes (and therefore no spring pressure is felt due to the hair pin springs). Not so with the vertical head. The intake is on a lobe and you will have to fight spring pressure when installing the belt to keep the pulley on its timing mark. This thing simply holds the intake pulley in place while you install the belt. I'd say get one, I mean to but haven't yet. Doable with out, but a bit of a pain...
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you very much.
 
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A trick I came up with when putting on the belt on the vertical cylinder if you dont have the cam holding tool; Simply rotate all the pulleys 5 teeth counterclockwise, put on the belts, then rotate the pulleys 5 teeth Clockwise to make sure all the dots are lined up properly. By rotating the pulleys 5 teeth CCW, the springs disengage on the closing rockers making it easy to put on the belts.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the tip Mike. So I have come to the conclusion that as long as the marks are matched up on the cam pulleys and lower drive pulley you can't go wrong on belt reassembly. At this position the horizontal cylinder is at tdc. Was always worried of having the timing off 180.
 

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Thanks for the tip Mike. So I have come to the conclusion that as long as the marks are matched up on the cam pulleys and lower drive pulley you can't go wrong on belt reassembly. At this position the horizontal cylinder is at tdc. Was always worried of having the timing off 180.
Correct, as long as the dots are all lined up on all 3 pulleys you are good to go.
Mike
 
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