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2021 Multistrada V4S Radar & Travel Pack
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Thanks for the feedback everyone, appreciate it. (y)

Looks like i'm going to go 15/42 with a new chain and sprocket kit....

I'm going to 525, I get why it's 530 std but i'm not hard on my gear and i don't load it like charlie and ewen....
Cheers loony888,

My previous bike, a KTM 1290SDGT had a DID 525 chain OEM - it was still in great condition after 34k kms and had I kept that rocket of a bike, that chain would have made >50k kms easily as it had only been adjusted twice in those 34k kms. The V4MS also has a 525 chain, and similar hp (but more weight) to the SDGT, but I'm about to adjust it for the second time within the first 15k kms (but it is a long chain so maybe that's magnifying normal break in wear).

The latest 525's are probably equal or better than the old 530 spec as they have less rotating mass for the same strength.

(y)
 

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Lads,
Read all the input with the gearing ratios etc, but I recall an conversation with a seasoned bike shop mechanic who mentioned when you go down below 15T on the front, you are actually stressing the chain prematurely due to the radius factor being to "sharp". This increases wear on the chain as it changes direction and whips around the front drive train.
When I bought my 2004 ST4s, it ran 14/38 combo which was great for the outright acceleration, overtaking etc and sat at a comfortable rpm when cruising legally also
I wanted to maintain that feel so when I renewed the drive chain and sprockets, I used the some maths to calculate what the new ratio would be with a 15T on the front

So, let X be the unknown new rear T number
So for me its a 2004 ST4S:
14:38 will be same as the new 15:X
Transposing 38/14x15 = 40.71 or 41 T on the rear
I actually went to a 42T which was on the shelf at my local dealer and still has got that great get up and go sweet spot on the highway.
There is another layman's term also which says one tooth on the front is equal to 3T on the rear, or if you change the gearing by factors of 1 on the front or 3 on then rear, expect a 3.3% change in or speed top end

Cheers
Gaz
 

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it's not the chain going around a tighter arc, it's the reduction in the number of sprocket teeth taking the load. Going from a 15t to a 14t is a 13% reduction in bearing surface. Rear sprocket has around 22 teeth sharing the load so no issues there. Adding more would theoretically increase chain life
 

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I‘ve heard the “extra chain wear“ theory concerning going with a smaller front sprocket and I under stand the logic, but real life experience does not back it up. I presently have 18000 miles on my 14/42 sprockets and DID xring chain with no sign of wear so far.
I'm at the exact same setup but only at 12 000 miles. I'm not seeing anything to indicate extra chain wear. If you are at 18000 miles and the chain is still good then at worse the extra wear is very minimal.
 

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I was just fiddling around with the gear commander app and it looks like the 14/40 combination gives a nice little boost in RPM's while requiring the least amount distance change of the eccentric. 15/42 with stock chain or with 116 links both need more adjustments fore and aft. Not sure if that's even an issue, but I like the idea of not needing to make extreme adjustments in either direction. Would appreciate feedback if I'm over analyzing for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I was just fiddling around with the gear commander app and it looks like the 14/40 combination gives a nice little boost in RPM's while requiring the least amount distance change of the eccentric. 15/42 with stock chain or with 116 links both need more adjustments fore and aft. Not sure if that's even an issue, but I like the idea of not needing to make extreme adjustments in either direction. Would appreciate feedback if I'm over analyzing for sure.
If the installer is lazy, and lots of multi franchise dealer techs are... they would bolt the larger sprocket on and then adjust the eccentric.
The correct way to do it is to reset the eccentric to the correct position and then reinstall the carrier/sprocket assembly, the chain and adjust if from there, which should be very minimal considering the chain is cut to suit....

SSSA bikes are great, they have so many advantages, but the number of bikes i've seen and heard about with funky set ups because the eccentric is way out of it's correct location amazes me.... the eccentric is adjustable through 360 degrees but really, only 90 degrees between 3 o clock and 6 o clock are actually usable, reset correctly is somewhere between 4 and 5 o'clock as i understand it
 

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I appreciate the time you took to explain that. This is my 1st SSSA bike, so my grasp of the mechanical workings is minimal. I assumed the range of motion would be 180 degrees like a bicep flexing, etc. I'll search for some diagrams so I can get a better visual. Now that I think about it, the gear commander app info I was referencing simply related to chain length. The 14/40 combo was closest to stock, while 15/42 was even longer. I assumed that would correlate to eccentric position as well. I'm probably overthinking this...and I've derailed the thread. 😆
 

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I found these images that helped me understand how this eccentric works. I was pretty ignorant about the whole thing. Too many years wrenching on old Supersports maybe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I appreciate the time you took to explain that. This is my 1st SSSA bike, so my grasp of the mechanical workings is minimal. I assumed the range of motion would be 180 degrees like a bicep flexing, etc. I'll search for some diagrams so I can get a better visual. Now that I think about it, the gear commander app info I was referencing simply related to chain length. The 14/40 combo was closest to stock, while 15/42 was even longer. I assumed that would correlate to eccentric position as well. I'm probably overthinking this...and I've derailed the thread. 😆
No worries, i'm not sure i got my point across though....
Basically, the eccentric has a reasonably small range (but enough for the life of the chain) of adjustment within the "correct" range, because of the diameter of the hub the range of movement is huge, so you could actually make a rear sprocket change and make it fit the existing chain, but, and i haven't tried so i don't know for certain here, it may require the eccentric be placed outside it's intended position which does a number of things, all side effects you don't really want, mostly it alters the rear ride height, but it also limits future chain adjustment because it's likely now placed in a position close to where it goes past the furthest point in it's arc and gets looser. That effectively negates the whole process....

In my OCD riddled mind the only way to alter the gearing properly is by resetting the eccentric and installing the sprocket, if the chain still fits great, if it has life left in it why waste it, but if not replace it, adjust it correctly and you will maintain the factory geometry, not over stress the output shaft bearing by being too tight and get many happy miles with a correctly installed set up in the gearing you want.....

Just my .02c
 

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No worries, i'm not sure i got my point across though....
Basically, the eccentric has a reasonably small range (but enough for the life of the chain) of adjustment within the "correct" range, because of the diameter of the hub the range of movement is huge, so you could actually make a rear sprocket change and make it fit the existing chain, but, and i haven't tried so i don't know for certain here, it may require the eccentric be placed outside it's intended position which does a number of things, all side effects you don't really want, mostly it alters the rear ride height, but it also limits future chain adjustment because it's likely now placed in a position close to where it goes past the furthest point in it's arc and gets looser. That effectively negates the whole process....

In my OCD riddled mind the only way to alter the gearing properly is by resetting the eccentric and installing the sprocket, if the chain still fits great, if it has life left in it why waste it, but if not replace it, adjust it correctly and you will maintain the factory geometry, not over stress the output shaft bearing by being too tight and get many happy miles with a correctly installed set up in the gearing you want.....

Just my .02c
I was looking over the shop manual I have for 2016 Multi and it indicates the initial installed position for the eccentric is the 6 o'clock position. It then moves to accommodate the stock length chain, which would support your thought of 4 or 5 o'clock being the correct position after adjustment. I'm really leaning towards the 14 tooth front sprocket. I think I'll shoot my shop a quick email in the morning and ask what avenue they suggest for reliability, etc.
 

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Went -1 / +1 and I personally think it's perfect now. If you haven't been on gearingcommander.com you can see where the speeds and rpm range will be in each gear. I've changed my gearing on each of my Ducati's. Multi's and ST3's are all geared too tall imo. (semi) legal highway speeds never line up with the comfortable sweet spot in the revs, I was alway a touch high or slightly lugging it. Sprocketcenter.com for sprockets and chains, super friendly, knowledgable folks. Good prices and response time.
 

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So the std gearing is 15/40 with a 530 pitch, I see lots of posts about lifespan etc, and i have seen the occasional post about adding two on the rear, some have dropped a tooth on the front, which i'm nota fan of, especially on a bike with this much suspension travel...

So i'm curious, who has changed their gearing and if so to what?
I understand lowering it will reduce the theoretical top speed in all likelihood and it may increase consumption
but i get pretty frugal figures so i could deal with that....
I just find it a bit tall, it feels like in 5th or 6th at our common cruising pace it's just under that point in the rev range where the acceleration comes on strong, i have to change down or roll on and wait for maybe 300/400rpm and it's away.

I know that the electronics can fool us into thinking the bike isn't to our liking because the electronics can interfere so i tried to turn it all off, can't figure out how to, so i put it in sport, turned everything down to it's lowest setting and tried it, still feels like it's the same to me....
I've highlighted a few things here:
All my three Ducati's were geared too tall. You're not alone thinking that.
1) Did -1F on my Panigale , +2R on the Monster and also +2R at the first 600 miles service on the 1260 Multistrada. I wasn't going to wait a few seasons with a gearing I didn't like.
2) Going +2R will not reduce you're top speed as the Multi's power is not sufficient to reach redline in 6th with the stock gearing. Your top speed with +2R will remain the same as stock albeit at a highter RPM.
3) The biggest improvement in going +2R is snail speed management. You just won't have to slip the clutch as often.
4) You should feel a bit more acceleration initially but after a couple of rides, you will not longer notice the difference as you'll get use to it.
 
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