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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I finished my first timing belt and valve service on my 2015 DVT. There is not much out there on the DVT version of this service, so I thought I'd add some hopefully helpful observations. I had an ST4S for years, I did 3 of these services on that bike, so my experience comes from that perspective.

First, anyone attempting this, they should be familiar with these two videos.

Next there are copies of the Ducati manual for the Multistrada DVT out there. It is helpful, but not complete.

Gas Tank - Be careful, you do not want to break the fuel line fitting. The fuel line is released from the ring fitting by first pushing both the ring and the line downward, towards the tank. Release the line from downward pressure, keeping the downward pressure on the the ring, rotate the fuel line a bit, it should pop out. No forcing anything here.

Belt Covers - I'm experienced with this service on an ST4S. However DVT belt covers have a twist. First there is a panel with a logo on the horizontal cover that needs to pop off, see pic. Next , the vertical cover is two pieces: the upper and 'middle' panel. Per the Ducati manual, that thing (middle) will only come out if the airbox is removed. See more info below. For reference, here's a pic of the back of the logo panel that pops out.
IMG_6732.JPG
Remove Airbox yes? The airbox vs the middle section of the vertical belt cover. That belt cover section does not want to come out. Luigi packed 'er in there. Per the Ducati manual, the airbox/throttle body assembly must come out. I followed the Ducati manual, and the airbox/throttle body unit removal is a bear. Nothing like the old ST4S. The box itself cannot come out intact. It is a 2 piece unit (after the air filter is out) It must be split before it can be removed. That is not mentioned in the manual nor are the many connections that need to be undone to remove.
1. Electrical connections on the left side of the airbox. Unplug those. However what the manual doesn't tell you is that you need to remove one of the connectors from the airbox to be able to remove the airbox. Removing that connector was a puzzle in and of itself.
2. Also not mentioned is an air-line/hose clamp by both vertical and Horizontal intake connection. There is a pinch clamp there that must be slid to the side before the small hose connection can be removed from the airbox.
3. After the air filter is removed, further disassembly is required to remove the airbox. It will not come out of the frame unless the 7 or screws are removed to split the unit. The bottom comes out first then the 'top'.

Remove Airbox, no! - Alternatively Jim states in his Video that the pesky belt cover can be removed without removing the airbox, by instead first removing the vertical tensioner pulley. I thought that would be too fiddly, fitting the new belt, tensioning it etc with the belt cover section in the way. I wished that I had explored that option. You do not want to remove the airbox for this service, trust me.

Vertical Cam Lock & Belt Marking - In the video, Jim jams a carbon rod between the vertical cams to lock them in place (per Jim that is 9mm FYI). I thought about making a cog lock with the old belt. Instead I did not concern myself with locking the cams. As an alternative, I marked the vertical belt at TDC of both Horizontal and Vertical cylinders. I used yellow paint for one and white for the other. I did not use a TDC crank lock tool. Instead I started at Horizontal TDC. I set the crank handle to 9 o'clock. I marked both belts, then removed the Horizontal belt. Moving the crank tool counter clockwise to '12', takes the motor to Vertical TDC. I marked the Vertical belt a 2nd time in this position. During the service I kept everything between these two positions: 9 o'clock and 12 o'clock, never drifting beyond either position until the belts were back on. I also used a wooden chop stick as a TDC check through the spark plug hole. I only used one. The chop stick was always in the TDC cylinder or in the next cylinder prior to moving to TDC. This was a secondary control to visually know where the engine was at all times: TDC horizontal or TDC vertical.
IMG_6734.JPG IMG_6735.JPG

Vertical Belt removal - I removed both the tensioner pulley and idler pulley to get the belt out.

Cam Management - I worked on each cylinder separately. First the vertical valves, refit the belt, then moved on to the horizontal. I never had all 4 cams out at once. This too helped me be certain about engine position.

Cam removal - Removing the cams is a bit tricky. The right side bridge is partially secured by factory RTV adhesive. Here's what I did, I backed off the cam bridge bolts so that these were each about 2mm off the bridge. There are 4 bolts per bridge. I did this with all 8 bolts on both bridges. Next I used one of the old timing belts to lift/ease the cams out of their nested position. I did so by fitting the old belt on the crank side of the belt cog then with a hammer handle hitting the inside of the belt to provide small force. I took my time and tapped and alternated cams until they popped out.

Valve Holder - On my ST Desmo services, I used a shrink-rubber tipped pair of hemostats. Those were just 'ok'. For this service I bought an EMS 7mm valve holder. I had issues with this set of pliers working on the exhaust side. The geometry just isn't right. I ended up buying a pair of long right angle needle nose pliers at the hardware store. I used shrink rubber tubing on the tips, no other mods. I used a power clamp to get the right tension on the valve stem. Only need to set that once. Add and remove the clamp over the handle with each use.
IMG_6733.JPG
Fitting of the belts - When it came time to fit the belts, I rotated the engine to Vertical TDC and fitted the belt to the white markings, one at each cam and one on the crank. Reattached the pulleys tightened the tensioner pulley to a provisional tension, say 60hz. Rotate clockwise to Horizontal TDC, fit the Horizontal belt, reattach the tensioner pulley to provisional ~60hz. Make sure all markings line up on both belts in Horizontal position and for the vertical belt in the vertical position. After a couple hand crank rotations, set each belt to final tension at respective TDC. All set! FYI, my old belts were 5 years old 8k miles, those had measured at ~50hz!!!

Valve Cover Gaskets - Do not try to reuse the gaskets. These have old 3-bond/RTV on them. Cleaning this up is not trivial. I wanted to avoid using heavy chemicals as those could harden the rubber. The removal products out there do not say 'safe for rubber'. I used WD-40 and a lot elbow grease. Learn from my mistake, just buy new ones, ~$11 ea.

Smoke - I remember a little smoke while warming up the engine after this service on the ST. For the DVT, I had a lot of smoke from the aft side of the Vertical Cylinder on the DVT. There is no easy visible access to the vertical exhaust port. You can't see anything. I thought maybe I had a valve cover leak. It was fine. Just some oil spillage on the vertical exhaust header, as in my prior Desmo services, it burns off.

Lastly take lots of picture on the tear down. Really handy to go back on look at say cam lobe positions at TDC for each cylinder (they are different!), routing paths for hoses, marked belts prior to removal.

That's all I got. Hope this helps.

-B
 

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Thanks for this. I've already binge watched all the Desmowerx vid. I will not need to do this for years (I hope) as my Enduro only has just over 1100km on it. Where would we be without chopsticks? I used the same to gauge TDC on my old bevel twin when setting up an electronic ignition system.
 

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Thank you very much for posting. I am about 2K miles from being due on my 2016 MTS Enduro - really appreciate the pro tips!

I'm curious, how many shims did you need to adjust. Also any tips on parts and where to buy special tools?

great post!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
F16Houdini - For parts,
1. Shims - I recommend popping for the shim kit. I got that from LT Snyder at Desmotimes. I did end up in an exchange with LT himself on the DVT belt job. As of last spring he had not yet done a belt job on a DVT, so his repair manual update wasn't being updated for this service.
2. Valve stem pliers - I still need to unload the valve stem pliers that I bought. Something changed in the DVT head, these pliers will not grasp all the valve stems properly. My solution is the long 90 degree pliers to hold the valve stem. A fairly common item in hardware stores. Certainly available on Amazon.
3. Spark Plug book pliers - I did not mention this in my post, but as has been posted on this forum many times, removing the spark plug boots is a bear. No twisting seems to be the consensus. Pull straight out, those suckers will stretch in the strain. I put some dielectric grease on the contact and coat of antiseize on the outside where there is contact in the spark plug hole wall. Hopefully these will come off easier next time.
1000102

Lastly I apologize for the lack of pictures in my post. It's been 8 months since I posted, re-read it again to see if it makes sense. I'm looking forward to someone trying the "remove the airbox, no!" option. The removal of the airbox sucks on oh so many levels. I had a little over fill spill to my gastank this summer with the bike on the side stand. There was a few ounces of fuel that 'urped' out as I was taking the fuel nozzle away. I was expecting fuel to drain out on to the ground but nothing. I later tore down to figure it out. The fuel drain line was pinched.

Post with your experience, good luck!

-B
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I should also mention the crank tool. I did not use a crank lock tool. I have a motomfg crank rotating tool. I encourage anyone attempting this job to tear down the bike, remove fairing bits, gas tank, belt covers, spark plugs, cam covers etc, then install the crank rotating tool with belts on and find TDC on the horizontal cyl, mark the belts, then find TDC on the vertical cylinder. (As per above go from 9 oclock counter-clockwise to 12 o'clock, = TDC on Horizontal Cyl to TDC on Vertical Cyl. Chopstick in TDC cyl and cam position are your verifiers for TDC position. Stay within this 9 to 12 and 12 to 9 zone until the belts are back on. This is key to doing the belt job without a cam locking tool.
 

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F16Houdini - For parts,
1. Shims - I recommend popping for the shim kit. I got that from LT Snyder at Desmotimes. I did end up in an exchange with LT himself on the DVT belt job. As of last spring he had not yet done a belt job on a DVT, so his repair manual update wasn't being updated for this service.
2. Valve stem pliers - I still need to unload the valve stem pliers that I bought. Something changed in the DVT head, these pliers will not grasp all the valve stems properly. My solution is the long 90 degree pliers to hold the valve stem. A fairly common item in hardware stores. Certainly available on Amazon.
3. Spark Plug book pliers - I did not mention this in my post, but as has been posted on this forum many times, removing the spark plug boots is a bear. No twisting seems to be the consensus. Pull straight out, those suckers will stretch in the strain. I put some dielectric grease on the contact and coat of antiseize on the outside where there is contact in the spark plug hole wall. Hopefully these will come off easier next time.
View attachment 1000102
Lastly I apologize for the lack of pictures in my post. It's been 8 months since I posted, re-read it again to see if it makes sense. I'm looking forward to someone trying the "remove the airbox, no!" option. The removal of the airbox sucks on oh so many levels. I had a little over fill spill to my gastank this summer with the bike on the side stand. There was a few ounces of fuel that 'urped' out as I was taking the fuel nozzle away. I was expecting fuel to drain out on to the ground but nothing. I later tore down to figure it out. The fuel drain line was pinched.

Post with your experience, good luck!

-B
 

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Great advice and my apologies in my delayed reply. I am new to the forum and forgot to follow the post so it took me a bit to find it again.

I will definitely heed your great tips and will also try to post pictures of anything I think is value added when I brave the attempt in a few months. Really appreciate the valve holder tool techniques as I was also looking at the EMS valve holder but think I will just spring for the shim kit snd the closing shim measuring tool in addition to the TDC lock on Amazon / eBay.

I see LT is on deployment till March so maybe my timing will align.

Can’t thank you enough and all the best!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Great advice and my apologies in my delayed reply. I am new to the forum and forgot to follow the post so it took me a bit to find it again.

I will definitely heed your great tips and will also try to post pictures of anything I think is value added when I brave the attempt in a few months. Really appreciate the valve holder tool techniques as I was also looking at the EMS valve holder but think I will just spring for the shim kit snd the closing ship measuring tool in addition to the TDC lock on Amazon / eBay.

I see LT is on deployment till March so maybe my timing will align.

Can’t thank you enough and all the best!
The closing shim measuring tool comes with the EMS kit, so no need to buy that separately. The shim kits ship even when he's on deployment FYI. As for the TDC tool, that might be useful in a shop with lots of different concurrent projects. I didn't see a use for that tool or springing for the expensive Ducati cam lock tool.
 

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F16Houdini - For parts,
1. Shims - I recommend popping for the shim kit. I got that from LT Snyder at Desmotimes. I did end up in an exchange with LT himself on the DVT belt job. As of last spring he had not yet done a belt job on a DVT, so his repair manual update wasn't being updated for this service.
2. Valve stem pliers - I still need to unload the valve stem pliers that I bought. Something changed in the DVT head, these pliers will not grasp all the valve stems properly. My solution is the long 90 degree pliers to hold the valve stem. A fairly common item in hardware stores. Certainly available on Amazon.
3. Spark Plug book pliers - I did not mention this in my post, but as has been posted on this forum many times, removing the spark plug boots is a bear. No twisting seems to be the consensus. Pull straight out, those suckers will stretch in the strain. I put some dielectric grease on the contact and coat of antiseize on the outside where there is contact in the spark plug hole wall. Hopefully these will come off easier next time.
View attachment 1000102
Lastly I apologize for the lack of pictures in my post. It's been 8 months since I posted, re-read it again to see if it makes sense. I'm looking forward to someone trying the "remove the airbox, no!" option. The removal of the airbox sucks on oh so many levels. I had a little over fill spill to my gastank this summer with the bike on the side stand. There was a few ounces of fuel that 'urped' out as I was taking the fuel nozzle away. I was expecting fuel to drain out on to the ground but nothing. I later tore down to figure it out. The fuel drain line was pinched.

Post with your experience, good luck!

-B
I just completed the 18k service on my 2016 MTS 1200s and can report that changing the belts with the middle cover in place was not too difficult. Before I started, I read through your advice several times and watched the belt replacement video by Jim three or four times. I thought that I could remove the middle cover by taking off the tensioner pulley and its post, but quickly realized this would be hard - the tensioner post is locktited into the head and takes a special Ducati socket to remove. Or a lot of struggle (& potential damage) with some other kind of wrench. So I left it alone and removed & replaced the vertical belt with the cover in place. Fortunately there is enough flexibility in the belt to get it past the tight spots without much trauma.

As for special tools, I used the Laser crank turning tool and crank locking tool like Jim had in his video. But I later realized I didn't really need the crank locking tool. As long as you keep track of where the crank is, the locking tool is not super important. It does provide a little security if you leave the bike sitting for awhile, though. Through the process of adjusting the valves and replacing and tensioning the belts, I ended up turning the crank from Horizontal TDC 270 degrees CCW to Vertical TDC and back multiple times. I used the Spectroid App that Jim mentioned to tension the belts. It's a little fiddly but seems to give consistent reads if you play with it awhile.

I also bought the shim kit sold by EMS Ducati. I already had a caliper for measuring the closer shims, but obtained an inexpensive micrometer off ebay so I could measure the opener shims too. I ended replacing 3 closer shims and 4 openers. Surprisingly, none of the clearances were tight - all were loose & required thicker shims.

Like you, I had a lot of difficulty getting the plug caps off and ended up using a couple zip ties on each cap to do it (there is a post about this somewhere on the forum). I ended up buying the new revised Ducati caps as I didn't want to reuse the old ones after all the stretching involved to get them off. The new caps are much easier to grab and also are pre-lubricated where they grip the spark plug.

So all is good - I started the bike up today & it runs great. Thanks for all of your pointers!
 

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I just completed the 18k service on my 2016 MTS 1200s and can report that changing the belts with the middle cover in place was not too difficult. Before I started, I read through your advice several times and watched the belt replacement video by Jim three or four times. I thought that I could remove the middle cover by taking off the tensioner pulley and its post, but quickly realized this would be hard - the tensioner post is locktited into the head and takes a special Ducati socket to remove. Or a lot of struggle (& potential damage) with some other kind of wrench. So I left it alone and removed & replaced the vertical belt with the cover in place. Fortunately there is enough flexibility in the belt to get it past the tight spots without much trauma.

As for special tools, I used the Laser crank turning tool and crank locking tool like Jim had in his video. But I later realized I didn't really need the crank locking tool. As long as you keep track of where the crank is, the locking tool is not super important. It does provide a little security if you leave the bike sitting for awhile, though. Through the process of adjusting the valves and replacing and tensioning the belts, I ended up turning the crank from Horizontal TDC 270 degrees CCW to Vertical TDC and back multiple times. I used the Spectroid App that Jim mentioned to tension the belts. It's a little fiddly but seems to give consistent reads if you play with it awhile.

I also bought the shim kit sold by EMS Ducati. I already had a caliper for measuring the closer shims, but obtained an inexpensive micrometer off ebay so I could measure the opener shims too. I ended replacing 3 closer shims and 4 openers. Surprisingly, none of the clearances were tight - all were loose & required thicker shims.

Like you, I had a lot of difficulty getting the plug caps off and ended up using a couple zip ties on each cap to do it (there is a post about this somewhere on the forum). I ended up buying the new revised Ducati caps as I didn't want to reuse the old ones after all the stretching involved to get them off. The new caps are much easier to grab and also are pre-lubricated where they grip the spark plug.

So all is good - I started the bike up today & it runs great. Thanks for all of your pointers!
I just completed the 18k service on my 2016 MTS 1200s and can report that changing the belts with the middle cover in place was not too difficult. Before I started, I read through your advice several times and watched the belt replacement video by Jim three or four times. I thought that I could remove the middle cover by taking off the tensioner pulley and its post, but quickly realized this would be hard - the tensioner post is locktited into the head and takes a special Ducati socket to remove. Or a lot of struggle (& potential damage) with some other kind of wrench. So I left it alone and removed & replaced the vertical belt with the cover in place. Fortunately there is enough flexibility in the belt to get it past the tight spots without much trauma.

As for special tools, I used the Laser crank turning tool and crank locking tool like Jim had in his video. But I later realized I didn't really need the crank locking tool. As long as you keep track of where the crank is, the locking tool is not super important. It does provide a little security if you leave the bike sitting for awhile, though. Through the process of adjusting the valves and replacing and tensioning the belts, I ended up turning the crank from Horizontal TDC 270 degrees CCW to Vertical TDC and back multiple times. I used the Spectroid App that Jim mentioned to tension the belts. It's a little fiddly but seems to give consistent reads if you play with it awhile.

I also bought the shim kit sold by EMS Ducati. I already had a caliper for measuring the closer shims, but obtained an inexpensive micrometer off ebay so I could measure the opener shims too. I ended replacing 3 closer shims and 4 openers. Surprisingly, none of the clearances were tight - all were loose & required thicker shims.

Like you, I had a lot of difficulty getting the plug caps off and ended up using a couple zip ties on each cap to do it (there is a post about this somewhere on the forum). I ended up buying the new revised Ducati caps as I didn't want to reuse the old ones after all the stretching involved to get them off. The new caps are much easier to grab and also are pre-lubricated where they grip the spark plug.

So all is good - I started the bike up today & it runs great. Thanks for all of your pointers!
Thanks for the advice and great add to a great thread! I’m ~600 miles away from 18K and expect to perform my Desmo Service in April. I think you answered one of my questions and if I understand you correctly you had no problem putting the Vert Cyl at TDC with the belts off by turning the crank 270° CCW and back CW - IS THAT CORRECT?

For the middle Vert Belt Cover I purchased the special tool for the tensioner pulley post and may give it a go, but I like the idea of not having to mess with it. I was curious if you also tried removing both the mobile and fixed tensioner pulleys to remove the cover? I assume you can’t and Jim’s solution is the way of you really want to remove the cover. I will give your technique a go - THANKS!

Finally did you clean the variator mesh oil filter plugs and if so really tough to get to? In the scheduled service list it’s referred to as “ Clean plugs with mesh filters on the cylinder heads”. You apparently had to remove the engine on the pre-DVT MTS to get to them but now the manual states you can access one plug on each cyl.

I’m also going to change my fork oil while I have the front end apart and will post any lessons here. The only thing that looks challenging is the .5mm tolerance for the fork leg height measured from the bottom yoke. I plan just to clean one leg at a time and reinstall then check height with the front axle.

Thanks again for posting!

Cheers,
Rob
 

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Thanks for the advice and great add to a great thread! I’m ~600 miles away from 18K and expect to perform my Desmo Service in April. I think you answered one of my questions and if I understand you correctly you had no problem putting the Vert Cyl at TDC with the belts off by turning the crank 270° CCW and back CW - IS THAT CORRECT?

For the middle Vert Belt Cover I purchased the special tool for the tensioner pulley post and may give it a go, but I like the idea of not having to mess with it. I was curious if you also tried removing both the mobile and fixed tensioner pulleys to remove the cover? I assume you can’t and Jim’s solution is the way of you really want to remove the cover. I will give your technique a go - THANKS!

Finally did you clean the variator mesh oil filter plugs and if so really tough to get to? In the scheduled service list it’s referred to as “ Clean plugs with mesh filters on the cylinder heads”. You apparently had to remove the engine on the pre-DVT MTS to get to them but now the manual states you can access one plug on each cyl.

I’m also going to change my fork oil while I have the front end apart and will post any lessons here. The only thing that looks challenging is the .5mm tolerance for the fork leg height measured from the bottom yoke. I plan just to clean one leg at a time and reinstall then check height with the front axle.

Thanks again for posting!

Cheers,
Rob
Rob - you are correct. First locate Horizontal TDC with the marks on both cylinder cam cogs lining up with the head flat surface and the layshaft mark lined up with the mark on the case (I was lucky and only had to spin the engine a handful of times to get the marks to line up). Then mark both the horizontal and vertical belts where the cam and layshaft marks are. You can then remove the horizontal belt and turn the engine 270 degrees CCW (or 3/4 of a turn) to get to vertical TDC. As Essing recommends, it helps to use a chop stick or some such in the spark plug hole to track movement of the piston. I followed Essing's advice and then marked the vertical belt at the points where the cam cogs lined up with the head flat surface. Below is a photo of what my marks look like with the vertical cylinder at TDC. The yellow are for Horizontal TDC and the orange is for vertical TDC. Having the cylinder you are working on at TDC makes it much easier when you are changing out the shims, as you don't have to worry about dropping a valve into the cylinder. I bought a long needle nose pliers but didn't use them much. Instead, I used an old wrist pin to lightly tap on the closer shims to help them release, then used a magnet to pull out the two half rings before grabbing the shim. I would let the valve lightly rest on the piston when I did some of this work. Note that when replacing the closer shims, you need to find some way to hold back the spring loaded closer arm. It will all make sense when you start working on it.

In regards to the pulleys, you should only need to loosen the tensioner pulleys to remove and replace the belts. I found that with the middle cover in place, you can't completely remove the vertical tensioner pulley, but you can slide it out most of the way. As a result, I'm guessing it would be impossible to fit the Ducati socket. I'm not sure exactly what JIm did, as he didn't show this in his video. It helps to move the rubber crankcase/airbox vent hose out of the way to remove & replace the vertical belt. You can remove the left end where it clamps onto the crankcase and push it over to the right. You can see where Jim did this in his video.

I didn't do anything with the the variator mesh filter plugs as I didn't realize they were a maintenance item. I'm not even sure what they are. The Ducati manual mentions the variable timing actuators, which are the electrically triggered devices that apparently regulate oil pressure in the DVT part of the cam. The manual says that if they are removed, to make sure that the ducts they fit into in the head are clean. I did remove the exhaust cam timing actuator on the horizontal head, as I wanted to know how hard it was to remove. When I was still trying to figure out a way to remove the middle cover, I thought that maybe by removing the actuator for the vertical intake cam, I could get the cover off. But trying to get to the m6 allen that holds it in place is really difficult, and I left it alone. The ducts on the horizontal actuator I did remove were perfectly clean.

According to the Ducati manual I have for the 2015 Multistrada, the difference for the fork legs is only 0.1mm. Since everything was apart, I took the forks off and replaced the fluid (which was really clean). Getting them lined up again wasn't too hard - you can always use some tape around the leg just below the bottom triple tree. Or if that fails, pay attention to the distance the top of the fork sits above the top triple clamp. That is what I ended up doing. Hope I got it right!

Sorry for the long-winded response. Hope this is helpful. Best,

Bill

1004737
 

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Rob - you are correct. First locate Horizontal TDC with the marks on both cylinder cam cogs lining up with the head flat surface and the layshaft mark lined up with the mark on the case (I was lucky and only had to spin the engine a handful of times to get the marks to line up). Then mark both the horizontal and vertical belts where the cam and layshaft marks are. You can then remove the horizontal belt and turn the engine 270 degrees CCW (or 3/4 of a turn) to get to vertical TDC. As Essing recommends, it helps to use a chop stick or some such in the spark plug hole to track movement of the piston. I followed Essing's advice and then marked the vertical belt at the points where the cam cogs lined up with the head flat surface. Below is a photo of what my marks look like with the vertical cylinder at TDC. The yellow are for Horizontal TDC and the orange is for vertical TDC. Having the cylinder you are working on at TDC makes it much easier when you are changing out the shims, as you don't have to worry about dropping a valve into the cylinder. I bought a long needle nose pliers but didn't use them much. Instead, I used an old wrist pin to lightly tap on the closer shims to help them release, then used a magnet to pull out the two half rings before grabbing the shim. I would let the valve lightly rest on the piston when I did some of this work. Note that when replacing the closer shims, you need to find some way to hold back the spring loaded closer arm. It will all make sense when you start working on it.

In regards to the pulleys, you should only need to loosen the tensioner pulleys to remove and replace the belts. I found that with the middle cover in place, you can't completely remove the vertical tensioner pulley, but you can slide it out most of the way. As a result, I'm guessing it would be impossible to fit the Ducati socket. I'm not sure exactly what JIm did, as he didn't show this in his video. It helps to move the rubber crankcase/airbox vent hose out of the way to remove & replace the vertical belt. You can remove the left end where it clamps onto the crankcase and push it over to the right. You can see where Jim did this in his video.

I didn't do anything with the the variator mesh filter plugs as I didn't realize they were a maintenance item. I'm not even sure what they are. The Ducati manual mentions the variable timing actuators, which are the electrically triggered devices that apparently regulate oil pressure in the DVT part of the cam. The manual says that if they are removed, to make sure that the ducts they fit into in the head are clean. I did remove the exhaust cam timing actuator on the horizontal head, as I wanted to know how hard it was to remove. When I was still trying to figure out a way to remove the middle cover, I thought that maybe by removing the actuator for the vertical intake cam, I could get the cover off. But trying to get to the m6 allen that holds it in place is really difficult, and I left it alone. The ducts on the horizontal actuator I did remove were perfectly clean.

According to the Ducati manual I have for the 2015 Multistrada, the difference for the fork legs is only 0.1mm. Since everything was apart, I took the forks off and replaced the fluid (which was really clean). Getting them lined up again wasn't too hard - you can always use some tape around the leg just below the bottom triple tree. Or if that fails, pay attention to the distance the top of the fork sits above the top triple clamp. That is what I ended up doing. Hope I got it right!

Sorry for the long-winded response. Hope this is helpful. Best,

Bill

View attachment 1004737
Thanks Bill! Great advice and I really appreciate the detailed response. I plan to copy your moves and will post my results. I too wonder if the tensioner pin tool will be unobstructed by the frame so if I can get by without removing it I will too.

As for the “TIMING VARIATOR OIL FILTER“ it is separate from the variator actuator and detailed on pg 138 of the 2016 MTS 1200 Enduro manual. I will see if I can post a screen shot, but here’s the manual text:

“ It is now possible to reach the two plugs (10) of the oil filters for the timing variators.

The following procedure is the same for both filters.

Loosen plug (10) and keep O-ring (11), remove oil filter (12).

Fit oil filter (12).

Use the indicated product (engine oil) to lubricate the plug (10) and the O-ring (11). Fit plug (10) and tighten to 22.5 Nm (min. 20 – max. 25).“

If you look at the parts manual for the cyl head it’s under “ Drawing 13A & 13B - VERTICAL CUL HEAD or TESTA ORIZZONTALE - DISTRIBUZIONE” - part #14 for my bike. The plugs are on the top part of the Horizontal Cyl and the aft part of the Vertical (basically on the back center of each head in line just below the exhaust cam pulley. You can probably get to it when you do your 27K air filter checks, but I’m sure it’s fine.

I’m feeling confident now thanks to each of you and I will take my time with chop sticks, 2 different color paint pens, and patience in hand.

Beers on me when our paths cross.

CHEERS!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@ Bill "Guzzati". Glad you were able to deal with the belt change without removing the middle cover or the dreaded airbox. Good to know for next time and great guidance for others that pursue this service.

@ F16Houdini: I did not deal with the variator filters. The vertical one is not at all trivial to remove and inspect. My bike had low miles, I did the service because the belts were 5 years old. Inspecting the variator filters is called for at the 2nd desmo service. That said, I think a practical approach is to inspect the horizontal filter. If clear, don't worry about the vertical filter until the next inspection.

-Bill
 

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@ Bill "Guzzati". Glad you were able to deal with the belt change without removing the middle cover or the dreaded airbox. Good to know for next time and great guidance for others that pursue this service.

@ F16Houdini: I did not deal with the variator filters. The vertical one is not at all trivial to remove and inspect. My bike had low miles, I did the service because the belts were 5 years old. Inspecting the variator filters is called for at the 2nd desmo service. That said, I think a practical approach is to inspect the horizontal filter. If clear, don't worry about the vertical filter until the next inspection.

-Bill
Thank you! I definitely owe you Bill and best user name to date!
 
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