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2006 ST3
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

This is my first post and I am in need of guidance. My 2006 Ducati ST3 was inundated in Hurricane Ida (I live in Mamaroneck, NY). I got her to high enough ground where she would have survived Hurricanes Sandy and Irene but Ida flooding was much worse. I thoroughly dried the electrics and the dash lights cycle through as normal. I have not attempted to start her as it looks like there is water in the oil. Hopefully taking her to my local dealer (Rockwell Cycles, Fort Montgomery, NY) for review and service. Appreciate any and all direction/guidance as to next steps from anyone else that has dealt with this type of issue. She has only 8k miles on her and deserves to ride again.

Cheers,

Chris

Hiding in the bushes next to the raised foundation (high-water mark to the right; manual under the seat stayed dry)
Plant Property Window Fixture Wood

After pulling her out from under the cover (street to the left had approximately 8-10 feet of water on it)
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Plant

Flooding in the parking garage at near peak levels
Window Automotive lighting Building Road surface Asphalt
 

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Good decision to not start it. It may have water in the cylinders. I would strip the bodywork, remove the spark plugs and put a stick in them to see if it gets wet. Chopsticks work well for that. I'd also change all fluids and check the air filter to see if it's ok. Be sure to let things dry out completely. The ECUs on these bikes aren't the most robust and the last thing you want is a short that could fry it.
 

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Water made it only up to the seat? Can't tell from the pic.

All that above and get some CRC wire drier spray and some WD-40 to use. Underwater completely for more than a day? An air compressor with a blow attachment might help too; chain, wheel bearings, head bearings, throttle grip/handlebars - wow, lot a places to hold water and dirt. That is a dry clutch model, isn't it? Might pop off the cover and see if it is all rusted. You can lightly sand off that by putting sandpaper down on a piece of glass.

All Fluids means exactly that, gas, oil, clutch/brake fluid - I would not trust any of it. You might get lucky just checking the grease spots, wheels and swingarm. Brake rotors will probably sort themselves out with riding once you have changed out the fluid completely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First off, thank you for your posts.

I am not sure how high the water actually was but the motorcycle manual was tucked under the seat in the tool pouch and everything there was dry. Bit of water in the removable plastic cup ahead of the tool tray as the tire plug kit was damp. Total time under water is I believe less than 8-12 hours but that is a guess as the night is mostly a blur now and I had no safe way to reach the bike.

I will start by removing the fairings and draining/refilling the oil a couple of times, removing the plugs and checking for water in the cylinders and blowing out what's there, and adding a bit of oil to the cylinders and turning them over by rotating the rear wheel.

My goal is to try and prevent any damage and then get her to Rockwell as fast as possible. Thank you again for your help.
 

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I prefer a very small squirt of Marvels Mystery Oil in the cylinders rather than WD-40 or engine oil.

If you don't have and can't borrow from a friend an air compressor, Home Depot will rent you one and probably a few other independent tool rental places might have one.
 

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Great advice above, only thing I would add is dont wait to get it to your dealer to drain all the fluids. Even if you arent able to do anything else with it strip all the fairings as recommended. Pull the plug wires so it wont start. Then go ahead and drain everything. Especially the oil, if there is water in it get it out now. Then put Marvel mystery oil down the cylinders as suggested. WD40 will do if you cant get any Marvel.

Its not the end of the world but definitely get the water out of everything ASAP. The longer its in there the more likely to be lasting issues.
 

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The other thing to know--Was it fresh water or Salt Water, Slat Water will no far more damage in the long run, I agree to change all fluids pull the spark plugs & see if water in in the cylinders, Marvel Mystery oil will also help greatly. Pull the air filter as well & see if water got in there, If it was salt water you may need to replace some bearings as well --wheel, swingarm etc. If it was Salt Water you may want to strip all body work & hose everything down real well with fresh water-yes you will have to dry things out again but get rid of the salt.
I have been in the situation here in Daytona Beach where I have had to take care of many motorcycles that were under Salt water sometimes it goes well sometime no so much it all depends on how long it was under water & how deep & then how long is it left to sit before it is taken care of---The faster you deal with the issues the better the outcome.
 
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Seen it suggested already but to underline it, the WD in WD40 stands for Water Displacement (40th formulation)
 

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The electronics are going to be the issue. I lived in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina and went thru some other floods while there. Any vehicle under water was totaled. If the water has damaged the bike, I suspect your insurance company will total it (if you have comprehensive on it).
 

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Hi!

I'm with TigerGA on this one, sorry. I've had experience with fresh water flood vehicles, none of them are good. Granted, it's not as bad as a car, mould will come. Rust will appear everywhere, and the electrical pixies will arrive and drive you insane. I'd get an insurance payout, and find another ST.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for all the input.

Quick update on progress - bottom line is that I was extremely lucky. The cylinders were dry, air box was never breached but did have water in the motor oil. Looks like the bulk of the electronics remained dry as the front of the bike was facing up an incline. Had water in the pipes but think trapped air from the bike's position may have helped. Drained the pipes. Drained and changed the oil and she fired on the first push of the starter button using the original battery. Taking her to the dealer to check bearings, etc. when I can. Will continue to clean/change oil again and use this time to correct fairing issues and install fork mounted Denali DMs while she continues to thoroughly dry out.

I forgot to mention in the original post that the water was fresh water as the area is surrounded by the Mamaroneck and Sheldrake Rivers which empty into the Long Island Sound.

I will add more details/pictures when I can as it may help someone else down the road.
 

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Very lucky, the dry airbox saved it . Inspecting and greasing the wheel bearings and swingarm is a regular maintenance item anyway. Wouldn't hurt to change the brake fluid and clutch fluid either, those are yearly maintenance items too but with all the humidity its a good idea to do it soon.
 
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