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Discussion Starter #21
while the engine and frame are away I have turned my attention to overhauling the front forks… they were not leaking but I thought I would treat them to some new seals and dust covers…. looks like someone has recently changed just one side by the state of the oil...

 

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Discussion Starter #22
the engine cases are back from the vapour blasters… what a superb job! attention to detail is what its all about and they came back prefect… I will definitly use this guy again… the finish is as good as I have ever seen… Sp Vapour Blasting I know these cases are painted from original but the pain always flakes off, so I have decided to leave them bear, and use ACF 50 on them to keep them looking nice… this will probably be a low miles, fair weather bike for me…

the engine build begins… I got the cases nice and hot and pressed the bearings in, and then checked the crank and gearbox shafts end float as I wont be using a gasket as Ducati have now discontinued them and use Threebond in place … I had already ordered a few shims by measuring the old gasket (14 thou) and taking that off the shims that are in there… when the shims come in a few days I will build it properly…





 

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Discussion Starter #24
todays job has been cleaning out the oilways in the barrels after being vapour blasted... To do this properly and get every last bead of media out I removed and replaced the core plugs... they are cheap to buy. There was a surprising amount of crud behind them... Made a couple of stepped punches so I could drift them in nice and square.

Checked the bores for wear, there simply isn't any! Ground the valves in with some fine paste (how old is that tin of grinding paste 😅) and checked I had a continuous seal with a sharpie pen. Gave the guides a quick clean with the burnishing hone which just removes carbon,

Finally, a good wash in petrol the tray and a check in the bottom for any blasting media. My mate who builds automatic gearboxes gave me the tip on the stainless steel trays... you really can see any debris in the bottom!

 

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Discussion Starter #25
Waiting for the engine spares at the moment, so filled some time doing some bead blasting on bits and pieces… one of the best bits of kit I have is a blast cabinet… It used to live outside at the back of the garage because I could never seal it from escaping media as obviously the air tries to inflate the cabinet… with machines about abrasive dust is a no no… Then I hit on the idea of a centrifugal type filter, which offers no resistance to the air going through it. I made the filter out of an Ikea plastic box and some sink drain pipe, it vents outside…. the principle is as the air is made to twist and turn, the partials of dust and media centrifuge out and drop to the bottom of the chambers… so the first chamber gets the most, the second less and so on. there is hardly anything on the drive and nothing in the workshop. its difficult to get this level of restoration to a part without it… Bead also gives that nice sheen to alloy parts and they don’t pick up dirty finger prints. its very good at resisting oxidation as well, particularly with a coat of ACF-50… here is the fuel tap.

I used to make a BIG mistake with bead blasting… I could never get a really nice finish except with brand new media… I moaned at the supplier once and he asked me what pressure I blasted at… high as I can I told him.. there is your problem then! you are shattering the glass beads and turning them into sharp dust, hence you get a dull surface! So I went home, filled my cabinet with new bead and got my wife to turn up the pressure as I cleaned a part… soon as it went shiny, that was the best pressure!



here is the difference old bead high pressure, new bead low pressure!



here is a before and after on some weber carbs I rebuilt...





here is how the filter works

 

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Discussion Starter #26
50 years ago I was an apprentice to the best mechanic I have ever known…Gerry Lampit. He is 89 now and I still visit him… still sharp as a razor … He taught me that the hammer was the last resort… that’s always stayed with me. So when I needed to change the swinging arm bearings his words rang in my head



Parts have arrived from Moto Rapido. What a pleasure it is to deal with Craig and Luke, they are SO helpful and knowledgeable! after years of suffering the ignorant local dealer, these guys are the best!



The engine rebuild has started… the cases are together, crank and gearbox shafts shimmed, and I spent a couple of hours making a flywheel holding tool. it worked rather well. Don’t ask me why the hell I welded the bar right across it, had to cut it to get the socket on! senior moment!



 

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Bon Vivant
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Nice work!
Be sure to boil the cases after blasting , you need the pores of the aluminum to expand and release any blast media that gets forced into them. If you skip this step you will be releasing blast media into your oil when the engine reaches running temperatures and all the new parts become worn rapidly. I have seen a bimota (ducati) 900 fail twice after a rebuild because the oil cooler was where all the media was getting stuck...until it ran long enough.

Also we always have staked the crank plug as well as red loctite, better safe than sorry.
Another way to do it is; after the parts are rinsed thoroughly and you think they are clean, put all of the parts in a dishwasher and run it on the sanitize cycle which gets close to boiling hot and in my case the whole cycle runs for almost 3 hours. That has been working well for me and I can do all of the parts at one time. Do not use any soap or detergent that may oxidize the parts.
 

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Great idea maybe next time we get a new dishwasher I get the old one, Christmas is coming........,.
 

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Great thread, subscribed! I have a 1999 M900, and I'm learning a lot here!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
the rebuild of the heads is going well… some of the clearances are out though, not surprising as I gave the valves a bit of a grind in and replaced the half rings. I have a little spreadsheet that I put the values in, which calculates everything from there, and also mirrors the measurements in MM rather than the thous I prefer to work in. Old school I know!

Been doing the plating on and off, its time consuming, but I put parts in the bucket, set the timer so I don’t forget, and the magic happens… just a few parts to go…

frame and wheels are back from the powder coater, and its another superb job….









 

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looking good!

The plating results are great in the pictures, I have toyed with the thought to try it myself but time is not something I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
looking good!

The plating results are great in the pictures, I have toyed with the thought to try it myself but time is not something I have.

yes its time consuming, but you can get on with other stuff while its plating...

one of the things that has been niggling me is the engine oil pipes and oil cooler lines are badly corroded on the ends… replacements, even aftermarket are a fortune… So I decided to try and plate them… they actually came out rather well!



 

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Discussion Starter #33
Some bolts I just tighten… but critical components I always use a torque wrench… in the past I have used a long series a spanner and calculated the pull I need on a spring balance… but for some reason I could not get the spanner on I have used in the past and its part of an expensive set, so I didn’t want to modify it by grinding… , so had to make a tool… I knew that old spanner and socket would come in one day!

One tip I picked up years ago when I used to build Crossflow race engines was always mark the head nuts/bolts after the first stage torque. I would paint an arrow on them with tippex... then move on to the second stage torque, and then the final stage. then I would check all the arrows were facing the same direction, and if any weren't, I would give them an extra tweak until they did. the rational for this is that it takes much of the varying nut/bolt/washer friction out of the equation and you get an even clamping force.

Of course that's exactly what you do in effect on modern engines, but now in a more refined way with an angle gauge... on a BMW engine I recently worked on the bolts were torqued to 40 NM, then 90 degrees, then another 90... I still put arrows on them! the reason for that is its all to easy to get confused as they need to be puled down in sequence, and there are 20 bolts! its all too easy to forget where you are... and its not like a torque wrench where you give it a click to check! All too easy to give a bolt 90, 90 and another 90, at which point it pings!

 

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Discussion Starter #35
When people ask me why Ducati bikes are expensive to maintain… I say try doing the valve clearances and adjusting them to the correct specification… its a fiddly job on the bench, let alone in the frame! and this is just the 2V!

 

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Discussion Starter #37
Did a bit of painting and polishing today… painted and lacquered the clutch cover, and rear spring, and put a coat of lacquer on the cam belt covers which I had decided to carbon effect dip… not everyone’s cup of tea I know, but I like the look… The silencers came up really well! there were a few marks on them that would have niggled me so I decided to polish them.

as an aside, while the spray gun had some lacquer in, I finished off some cheese boards I have been making as Christmas presents for friends... its got me a few brownie points with the wife which I desperately needed !!! the fruit and spices are encapsulated in clear casing resin.



 

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Discussion Starter #38
Started the rebuild… first job was to put the frame on the engine, easy job, I held it, my wife popped the bolts in! I then fitted the headstock bearings, which I have replaced as there were small sighs of pitting, and they are cheap. I pulled them in rather than use a hammer, which also means you can give them a good tighten and bed them in nice and hard against the register. Its starting to come together… Was also playing around with the image of the engine…







 

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Discussion Starter #39
my wife will often say I am definitely on the spectrum :lol: :lol: today I fitted the side stand and noticed there was more play than I liked... so I made a new bush, and bronze thrust washer as I knew it would niggle me if I didn't!

 

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Discussion Starter #40
Its funny how to me progress seems slow, but when you come to put it all together you realise that all the little jobs you have been doing over the months are now paying off as it becomes an assembly job! One thing I have done in the last few days is to check the loom over… its in great condition apart from one area… It looks like someone has fitted an alarm at some point…, and someone has subsequently removed it! they didn’t do a bad repair, but I hate the tape over bare wires, and I wanted to check the integrity of the joints, so I pulled the soldered wires apart and re-soldered them, and covered the join with shrink wrap. To finish it off nicely I took the terminals out of the blocks with my terminal removal tool. this is a fantastic little set of tools, and very cheap to buy.. I have lost count of the times I have used them over the years! that meant I could use some braided expandable sheathing which most cars seem to use these days. it means it can go over the terminals and then fit tight on the wires. this is finished off with some hear shrink, and if you use the glue lined stuff it makes a good repair.

probably my last update this side of the holiday... Merry Christmas!







 
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