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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
it's 2019 and the battery is old from 2013, either way it's been on a tender and started the bike just fine. Mid-ride bike dies in the middle of no where. I went and put in a brand new shorai battery in, bike strated fine, rode on freeway for 15 miles then it dies again, only showing 5V when it was 13.5V at idle prior and 12.5V at rest.

Is this a bad rectifier? Bike only has 4500 miles - hoping those can help.

My bigger question is what's happenening here a symptom of a bad rectifier draining the battery and not giving it enough juice?
 

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Sounds like you are on the right track with the charging circuit. There should be a large fuse, 30-40amp that you want to check first. Next check the wiring for heat and damage especially the 3 wire connection from the stator to reg/rec. this connection is notorious for burning up and causing exactly what you are experiencing. While you are looking at the 3 wire stator/regulator wiring perform the below tests. Unplug the 3 wire plug before testing

My bigger question is what's happenening here a symptom of a bad rectifier draining the battery and not giving it enough juice?
The bike will run on battery power but is not charging so it will run the lights, injectors, ecu, and etc as long as the battery can last.


Borrowed from d'ecosse at https://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=35227&highlight=charging
Stator Test:

Next, do a resistance check on the stator (check at the cable connector going back towards the stator itself).
Measure between the three respective combinations of the three pins:
1-2
2-3
3-1
This time each of these should measure almost short circuit (very low resistance in order or about 1 ohm)

Also check from any one pin to the engine ground terminal – this should not read any indication – maximum resistance or open-circuit.
If you read ‘short’ in that last test, then your stator is definitely bad.
Not being short to engine casing is not necessarily an affirmative indication that all is well, compared to the contrary - a burned stator will invariably always have this short to engine, so is a very good initial simple check without having to open anything up.

If you did not measure a short between any of the pins and engine ground, next perform a voltage output test of the stator where you will check the AC voltage output from the stator with engine running:
Leave stator disconnected from the R/R and start the engines.
With meter set to read AC Volts check
1-2
2-3
3-1
All three should be the same value – any significant difference of one reading will indicate a bad phase and the stator is probably defective.
At idle this should be ~ 25V and rise to ~ 70V at 5K rpm. I almost hesitate to use absolute numbers here as this can be different between models and test equipment.
What you are looking for is same between phases and like increase on each phase as rpm increases.
If any of the above tests raises suspicion, pull the cover & inspect the stator. It is simple to do and can set your mind at ease by seeing what it looks like. Hopefully NOT with 1/3 of it a black charred mess!

If you have to replace the stator and R/R, especially because of a shorted R/R and excess current drain, be especially careful to ensure that your wiring has not been compromised. If the wiring has been fried, then you will continue to have issues and potential failure of those expensive components which have just been replaced! Replace any cable &/or connector plug that is not in optimum condition.
t_bare
 
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